Kosona Chriv

Kosona Chriv

  • Adalidda

  • Cambodia, Phnom Penh, Phnom Penh
Sustainable alternative to methyl bromide for Tomato production

A study in the June 2016 issue of HortScience focused on the effects of ASD in an open-field, fresh-market tomato production system. Field studies were conducted to evaluate and compare ASD with chemical soil fumigation (CSF) treatments for controlling weeds and nematodes, as well as for influence on tomato fruit yield and quality. In experiments conducted in southwestern (Immokalee) and northern Florida (Citra), conventional CSF was compared with two ASD treatments, which consisted of amending the soil with 22 Mg·ha-1 of composted poultry litter and two rates of molasses (13.9 and 27.7 m3·ha-1) as a carbon source.

Analyses showed that the application of ASD did not negatively affect commercial tomato fruit quality, and that quality and the mineral content of fruit produced with ASD was comparable or higher than that of fruit produced in CSF plots.

In both locations, the application of ASD provided a level of root-knot nematode control equivalent to, or more effective, than the CSF. Additional results showed that, in Immokalee, the CSF provided the most significant weed control, "but ASD treatments also suppressed weeds enough to prevent an impact on yield," the authors said. In Citra, all treatments, including the CSF, provided poor weed control relative to the Immokalee site.

Photo: Tomatoes were grown in field studies to compare anaerobic soil disinfestations (ASD) and chemical soil fumigation (CSF). ASD applied using a mixture of composted poultry litter and molasses as carbon source was shown to be an promising alternative to conventional CSF. Photo courtesy of Francesco Di Gioia.
https://adalidda.net/posts/AXstLnkznL3KNmyNd/sustainable-alternative-to-methyl-bromide-for-tomato

Post main image

Kosona Chriv
Kosona Chriv