Amadas Self Propelled Peanut Combines

Published Aug 17 


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By Anonymous Member


Does anyone on here use an Amadas self propelled peanut combine? What are the pros and cons of a SP vs a pull type??

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Anonymous Member
Anonymous Member
Aug 17  

Categories: Peanuts, Agribusiness, Purchasing

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By Jerry Smith
Published Oct 16 

Amadas Industries manufactures self-propelled and pull-type peanut combines. Both types of machinery can get the job done come harvest time, but there are definite advantages to self-propelled models.


In a joint venture with John Deere, Amadas Industries introduced the world’s first self-propelled, eight-row peanut harvester in the 1990s. Since then, the companies have continued to innovate to deliver the gold standard of peanut combines. According to Peanut Grower, “The Amadas SP peanut combine offers today’s peanut grower unparalleled ease of operation and incredible performance with harvest rates of up to 1,000 pounds per minute.”


Of course, the major disadvantage of self-propelled models is the price tag. Based on your operation, budget, and existing equipment, the decision between self-propelled and pull-along might not be completely cut and dry.


Here’s a look at some key factors to consider.


1. Minimized Loss and Damages Concerning Your Crop


With a traditional pull-type peanut combine harvester, the combine is pulled behind a tractor. This setup lends itself to the tractor tires unintentionally running over your crop from time to time. With self-propelled models, there is no need for a tractor since the harvester has its own propulsion.


Given this optimized approach where the harvester mechanism is at the front of self-propelled combines, Amadas estimates that “up to 15% less crop is lost or damaged than with the use of a pull-type combine.”


2. Increased Harvesting Capacity and Efficiency


Being able to harvest two to six rows at a time is common with traditional pull-types, but self-propelled combines can harvest six to twelve rows at a time. Additionally, the hopper’s holding capacity on self-propelled models is often 1,000+ pounds larger than on pull-types.


Marketing its latest SP model, Amadas reports, “The 9990’s harvesting capacity is over 33% greater than that of a comparable pull-type combine.”


A Peanut Production Guide from Clemson University explains, “Self-propelled combines … have higher field efficiencies than pull-type combines, mostly due to reduction in turning time.” To quantify that assertion, the Extension collected and generalized field data to compare the efficiencies of self-propelled and pull-type combines with various header widths at various ground speeds. 


For example, regarding combines with conveyor offloading systems and header widths of 24 feet operating at a ground speed of 3 miles/hour, self-propelled models have an effective field capacity (EFC) of 7.85 acres/hour compared to pull-types having an EFC of 6.55 ac/hr. For combines with bin dump systems but the same study parameters otherwise, the EFC of self-propelled models is 6.55 ac/hr versus pull-types having an EFC of 5.24 ac/hr.


3. Increased Costs Upfront


Although self-propelled models can help you save on time and labor in the long run, the upfront price tag can be double that of pull-type combines so isn’t for everyone. Where possible, consider trading in a pull-along when buying a self-propelled model to help offset the costs. 



Amadas Self Propelled Peanut Combines

Amadas Industries manufactures self-propelled and pull-type peanut combines. Both types of machinery can get the job done come harvest time, but there are definite advantages to self-propelled models.


In a joint venture with John Deere, Amadas Industries introduced the world’s first self-propelled, eight-row peanut harvester in the 1990s. Since then, the companies have continued to innovate to deliver the gold standard of peanut combines. According to Peanut Grower, “The Amadas SP peanut combine offers today’s peanut grower unparalleled ease of operation and incredible performance with harvest rates of up to 1,000 pounds per minute.”


Of course, the major disadvantage of self-propelled models is the price tag. Based on your operation, budget, and existing equipment, the decision between self-propelled and pull-along might not be completely cut and dry.


Here’s a look at some key factors to consider.


1. Minimized Loss and Damages Concerning Your Crop


With a traditional pull-type peanut combine harvester, the combine is pulled behind a tractor. This setup lends itself to the tractor tires unintentionally running over your crop from time to time. With self-propelled models, there is no need for a tractor since the harvester has its own propulsion.


Given this optimized approach where the harvester mechanism is at the front of self-propelled combines, Amadas estimates that “up to 15% less crop is lost or damaged than with the use of a pull-type combine.”


2. Increased Harvesting Capacity and Efficiency


Being able to harvest two to six rows at a time is common with traditional pull-types, but self-propelled combines can harvest six to twelve rows at a time. Additionally, the hopper’s holding capacity on self-propelled models is often 1,000+ pounds larger than on pull-types.


Marketing its latest SP model, Amadas reports, “The 9990’s harvesting capacity is over 33% greater than that of a comparable pull-type combine.”


A Peanut Production Guide from Clemson University explains, “Self-propelled combines … have higher field efficiencies than pull-type combines, mostly due to reduction in turning time.” To quantify that assertion, the Extension collected and generalized field data to compare the efficiencies of self-propelled and pull-type combines with various header widths at various ground speeds. 


For example, regarding combines with conveyor offloading systems and header widths of 24 feet operating at a ground speed of 3 miles/hour, self-propelled models have an effective field capacity (EFC) of 7.85 acres/hour compared to pull-types having an EFC of 6.55 ac/hr. For combines with bin dump systems but the same study parameters otherwise, the EFC of self-propelled models is 6.55 ac/hr versus pull-types having an EFC of 5.24 ac/hr.


3. Increased Costs Upfront


Although self-propelled models can help you save on time and labor in the long run, the upfront price tag can be double that of pull-type combines so isn’t for everyone. Where possible, consider trading in a pull-along when buying a self-propelled model to help offset the costs. 



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Categories: Peanuts, Agribusiness, Purchasing

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