Postemergence Herbicides for Eclipta in Peanuts?

Published Sep 10 


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By Anonymous Member


Looking for tips concerning identifying and controlling eclipta in peanut fields.

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Anonymous Member
Anonymous Member
Sep 10  

Categories: Peanuts, Crop Protection, Crop Scouting

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By Rick Foster
Published Sep 18 

Eclipta (Eclipta prostrata) is a summer annual broadleaf weed that can wreak havoc in your fields. The invasive plant, also known as yerba-de-tago and false daisy, has been identified in over 35 countries and can affect a number of crops including peanuts.


Research has shown that eclipta in peanuts can cause yield losses greater than 75%. Additionally, eclipta can be a host for diseases such as Sclerotinia blight (Sclerotinia minor) and can be an alternate host of Meloidogyne incognita, which is commonly known as southern root-nematode.  


Here’s a brief overview to identify, manage, and prevent eclipta-related issues on your farm.


1. How to Identify Eclipta in Field Crops


The species Eclipta prostrata is a flowering plant in the family Asteraceae, which is commonly known as the sunflower family. The USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database shows eclipta plants can grow up to three feet tall while having green foliage and white flowers. 


Also known as Eclipta alba, Eclipta erecta, Verbesina alba, and Verbesina prostrata, this plant usually flowers in the summer and fall, but flowering can actually occur at any point during the year given the right environmental conditions. The leaf shape is lanceolate, the margin can be serrate or smooth, the apex is acute, and the base is cuneate. 


Other characteristics to note include the stems being reddish-purple, the roots being fibrous, and the ray-and-disc flowers growing up to one centimeter in diameter. Similar species that may cause diagnostic confusion include Galinsoga (Galinsoga parviflora or Galinsoga quadriradiata) and Alligator weed (Alternanthera philoxeroides).


2. Controlling Eclipta in Peanuts


Even with preemergence applications of a soil-applied herbicide, eclipta can still be a problem in peanuts. Thankfully, there are postemergence herbicides that can help.


Effective controls include lactofen (Cobra), bentazon (Basagran), bentazon plus acifluorfen (Storm), and acifluorfen (Ultra Blazer). When applied early before eclipta is two-inches tall, Basagran 4SC applied at a rate of 1.5 pts has been shown to have a 99% control rate while Storm 4SC has a control rate of 97% under the same conditions. If the herbicide is applied later, when eclipta has already reached three-to-four inches tall, then the efficacy decreases dramatically. For example, Blazer 2SC when applied late at a rate of 1 pt has a control rate of only 30%.


Other factors to consider include how excessive is the peanut canopy, which can interfere with weed suppression, and what point you are in the growing season since the preharvest interval (PHI) for herbicides can vary. With Cobra, for example, the interval is 45 days.


3. How to Prevent or Minimize Eclipta Problems in the Future


Postemergence herbicide applications for eclipta in peanuts can only get you so far. To improve your results in the long-term, some good general management practices are key.


Remember, weed control efficacy lowers as you delay herbicide applications while your crops are emerging. In future growing seasons, make sure your preplant program and preemergence program for herbicide applications is optimized regarding products, timing, and rates.


Use multiple mechanisms of action and change what herbicide products you apply from season to season. Otherwise, the risks of herbicide resistance will increase. You can also improve long-term eclipta issues through rotating your crops.  

Postemergence Herbicides for Eclipta in Peanuts?

Eclipta (Eclipta prostrata) is a summer annual broadleaf weed that can wreak havoc in your fields. The invasive plant, also known as yerba-de-tago and false daisy, has been identified in over 35 countries and can affect a number of crops including peanuts.


Research has shown that eclipta in peanuts can cause yield losses greater than 75%. Additionally, eclipta can be a host for diseases such as Sclerotinia blight (Sclerotinia minor) and can be an alternate host of Meloidogyne incognita, which is commonly known as southern root-nematode.  


Here’s a brief overview to identify, manage, and prevent eclipta-related issues on your farm.


1. How to Identify Eclipta in Field Crops


The species Eclipta prostrata is a flowering plant in the family Asteraceae, which is commonly known as the sunflower family. The USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database shows eclipta plants can grow up to three feet tall while having green foliage and white flowers. 


Also known as Eclipta alba, Eclipta erecta, Verbesina alba, and Verbesina prostrata, this plant usually flowers in the summer and fall, but flowering can actually occur at any point during the year given the right environmental conditions. The leaf shape is lanceolate, the margin can be serrate or smooth, the apex is acute, and the base is cuneate. 


Other characteristics to note include the stems being reddish-purple, the roots being fibrous, and the ray-and-disc flowers growing up to one centimeter in diameter. Similar species that may cause diagnostic confusion include Galinsoga (Galinsoga parviflora or Galinsoga quadriradiata) and Alligator weed (Alternanthera philoxeroides).


2. Controlling Eclipta in Peanuts


Even with preemergence applications of a soil-applied herbicide, eclipta can still be a problem in peanuts. Thankfully, there are postemergence herbicides that can help.


Effective controls include lactofen (Cobra), bentazon (Basagran), bentazon plus acifluorfen (Storm), and acifluorfen (Ultra Blazer). When applied early before eclipta is two-inches tall, Basagran 4SC applied at a rate of 1.5 pts has been shown to have a 99% control rate while Storm 4SC has a control rate of 97% under the same conditions. If the herbicide is applied later, when eclipta has already reached three-to-four inches tall, then the efficacy decreases dramatically. For example, Blazer 2SC when applied late at a rate of 1 pt has a control rate of only 30%.


Other factors to consider include how excessive is the peanut canopy, which can interfere with weed suppression, and what point you are in the growing season since the preharvest interval (PHI) for herbicides can vary. With Cobra, for example, the interval is 45 days.


3. How to Prevent or Minimize Eclipta Problems in the Future


Postemergence herbicide applications for eclipta in peanuts can only get you so far. To improve your results in the long-term, some good general management practices are key.


Remember, weed control efficacy lowers as you delay herbicide applications while your crops are emerging. In future growing seasons, make sure your preplant program and preemergence program for herbicide applications is optimized regarding products, timing, and rates.


Use multiple mechanisms of action and change what herbicide products you apply from season to season. Otherwise, the risks of herbicide resistance will increase. You can also improve long-term eclipta issues through rotating your crops.  

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Categories: Peanuts, Crop Protection, Crop Scouting

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