Advertisement

34 Results

Search results for ' Maize'

  • Nuisance Lawsuits are Taking a Bite Out of Big Pork

    By Maria Dampman

    Published 11 months ago

    In 1611, William Aldred took his neighbor to court. Thomas Benton was being sued for “erecting a hogstye so near the house of the plaintiff that the air thereof was corrupted. ” In common language, the pigs stank, making it impossible for Aldred to enjoy his home which, in his words, had become “unbearable to live in. ” The courts sided with Aldred, saying the odor was “depriving him of his dignity” and therefore, a violation of his rights... A typical peasant diet was based on things like rice, maize and noodles – all items that could be cheaply and easily grown within their country...

    Categories: Hogs

    How Cover Crops Affect Your Fertilizer Strategy

    By Laura Barrera

    Published 1 years, 4 weeks ago

    When it comes to cover crops and nutrient management, a lot of the focus is on what cover crops can do for soil fertility. Depending on the species being used, they can prevent leftover nutrients from running off into waterways or even produce some fertilizer for future crop use. But how should farmers adjust their fertilizer practices for their cash crops following cover crops? John Pike, a contract researcher and cover crop specialist for the Zea Maize Foundation and IL Sustainable Agriculture Partnership, and a former Research Agronomist at the University of Illinois at Dixon Springs Research station, says that while there are some nuances that need to be planned for, the basic principles of soil fertility and crop management are much the same. “It’s a matter of fine-tuning the cover crop system to fit the soils, climate and equipment that’s available in the operation that we’re talking about on any given day,” he says. “We’re talking about soil fertility and growing corn and beans and wheat or whatever the crop is, so approach it from a logical standpoint, one step at a time, to figure out the best system for the crops, soils and equipment you’re dealing with...

    Grain Drying Technology Using Paddy Husk

    By SUNCUE Grain Dryer

    Published 4 months ago

    Burning paddy husk in a rice husk furnace can be a complete substitute for gas or diesel by burning paddy husk to provide necessary thermal energy. This not only increases the millers/farmer’s income through significantly reducing drying cost and improving grain quality, it is also an important 21st century drying industry breakthrough. Paddy husk had long been considered rural waste, but with this technical innovation it can produce amazing thermal energy. The thermal energy generated by 1 kilogram of paddy husk is about 3,000 to 3,500 kcal... For satisfying big capacity corndrying customers, SUNCUE also has there-circulating dryer especially for maize...

    Categories: Agribusiness, Grain Sorghum, Rice

  • No Groups Found
  • Nuisance Lawsuits are Taking a Bite Out of Big Pork

    By Maria Dampman

    Published 11 months ago

    In 1611, William Aldred took his neighbor to court. Thomas Benton was being sued for “erecting a hogstye so near the house of the plaintiff that the air thereof was corrupted. ” In common language, the pigs stank, making it impossible for Aldred to enjoy his home which, in his words, had become “unbearable to live in. ” The courts sided with Aldred, saying the odor was “depriving him of his dignity” and therefore, a violation of his rights... A typical peasant diet was based on things like rice, maize and noodles – all items that could be cheaply and easily grown within their country...

    Categories: Hogs

    How Cover Crops Affect Your Fertilizer Strategy

    By Laura Barrera

    Published 1 years, 4 weeks ago

    When it comes to cover crops and nutrient management, a lot of the focus is on what cover crops can do for soil fertility. Depending on the species being used, they can prevent leftover nutrients from running off into waterways or even produce some fertilizer for future crop use. But how should farmers adjust their fertilizer practices for their cash crops following cover crops? John Pike, a contract researcher and cover crop specialist for the Zea Maize Foundation and IL Sustainable Agriculture Partnership, and a former Research Agronomist at the University of Illinois at Dixon Springs Research station, says that while there are some nuances that need to be planned for, the basic principles of soil fertility and crop management are much the same. “It’s a matter of fine-tuning the cover crop system to fit the soils, climate and equipment that’s available in the operation that we’re talking about on any given day,” he says. “We’re talking about soil fertility and growing corn and beans and wheat or whatever the crop is, so approach it from a logical standpoint, one step at a time, to figure out the best system for the crops, soils and equipment you’re dealing with...

    Grain Drying Technology Using Paddy Husk

    By SUNCUE Grain Dryer

    Published 4 months ago

    Burning paddy husk in a rice husk furnace can be a complete substitute for gas or diesel by burning paddy husk to provide necessary thermal energy. This not only increases the millers/farmer’s income through significantly reducing drying cost and improving grain quality, it is also an important 21st century drying industry breakthrough. Paddy husk had long been considered rural waste, but with this technical innovation it can produce amazing thermal energy. The thermal energy generated by 1 kilogram of paddy husk is about 3,000 to 3,500 kcal... For satisfying big capacity corndrying customers, SUNCUE also has there-circulating dryer especially for maize...

    Categories: Agribusiness, Grain Sorghum, Rice

  • Posted By Laura Barrera
    1 years, 4 weeks ago

    https://agfuse.com/article/how-cover-crops-affect-your-fertilizer-strategy

    Posted By Cover Crops
    1 years, 4 weeks ago

    https://agfuse.com/article/how-cover-crops-affect-your-fertilizer-strategy
    Big data for smallholder farmers - THE CASE OF MUIIS UGANDA

    Author: Clare Pedrick

    © CTA 2018 EU financing

    Publisher: CTA

    To address these challenges, an innovative initiative is showcasing how ICTs can be used to capture satellite-based information on a wide range of agricultural indicators, packaging it into tailor-made messages for farmers in local languages. Led and implemented by the Technical Centre for Agricultural and Rural Cooperation (CTA), which has extensive experience in shaping ICT solutions for smallholder farmers, with seed funding from the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MFA) through the Geodata for Agriculture and Water (G4AW) Facility of the Netherlands Space Office (NSO), the Market-led, User-owned ICT4Ag-enabled Information Service (MUIIS) is a satellite data-enabled extension and advisory service that uses ICTs to address the current agricultural information gap in Uganda.

    The initiative has been designed to deliver a bundled service offering accurate weather alerts, agronomic tips and index-based drought insurance to help farmers make informed decisions. An unusual feature is the strong business focus, with a number of private sector partners on board and a design that sets out to create commercial opportunities for a range of players in the selected value chains, currently maize, soybeans, beans and sesame. The ultimate goal is to make the MUIIS system self-supporting, driven by the farmer organisations.

    Photo: Cover of Big data for smallholder farmers - THE CASE OF MUIIS UGANDA (© CTA 2018 EU financing)

    Check more

    Call for Proposals: Innovation Platforms, Agribusinesses and other Multi-stakeholders platforms to Scale Agricultural Technologies in Africa

    The goal of this call is to competitively provide support to existing/new innovation Platforms, agribusinesses and other Multi-stakeholders platforms to bring technologies to scale on TAAT commodities value chain: rice, wheat, maize, sorghum/millet, cassava, beans, sweet potatoes, fish and small livestock (including poultry).

    This call is only suitable for agribusinesses and multi-stakeholder groups working on the TAAT commodities value chain with business considerations. This call will prioritize the development and operationalization of business cases on the IP using existing technologies and less on conducting research to develop new technologies. As a result of this call, smaller Innovation platforms or clusters may be requested to consolidate into larger operational platforms.

    FARA has some seed funding from the African Development Bank to pilot capacity development support. Furthermore, it proposes to facilitate the development of investment portfolio for consideration at national level through the compilation of the applications to this call. Incremental and phased sub-grant funding and other capacity development support valued up to US $20,000 for a period of two (2) years and are expected to be provided to suitably developed proposals on case by case basis.

    Application Deadline: June 30th, 2019

    Illustration Photo: Tani Fund is experimenting with digital crop management for its partner-farmers. Each lead farmer is given a smart phone loaded with Tani Fund's app, which allows them to send photos and collect data about their crops. The digital element is in its early stages. (credits: UN SG's Special Advocate for Inclusive Finance / Flickr Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0))

    Check more

    Call for Proposals: Innovation Platforms, Agribusinesses and other Multi-stakeholders platforms to Scale Agricultural Technologies in Africa

    The goal of this call is to competitively provide support to existing/new innovation Platforms, agribusinesses and other Multi-stakeholders platforms to bring technologies to scale on TAAT commodities value chain: rice, wheat, maize, sorghum/millet, cassava, beans, sweet potatoes, fish and small livestock (including poultry).

    This call is only suitable for agribusinesses and multi-stakeholder groups working on the TAAT commodities value chain with business considerations. This call will prioritize the development and operationalization of business cases on the IP using existing technologies and less on conducting research to develop new technologies. As a result of this call, smaller Innovation platforms or clusters may be requested to consolidate into larger operational platforms.

    FARA has some seed funding from the African Development Bank to pilot capacity development support. Furthermore, it proposes to facilitate the development of investment portfolio for consideration at national level through the compilation of the applications to this call. Incremental and phased sub-grant funding and other capacity development support valued up to US $20,000 for a period of two (2) years and are expected to be provided to suitably developed proposals on case by case basis.

    Application Deadline: June 30th, 2019

    Illustration Photo: Tani Fund is experimenting with digital crop management for its partner-farmers. Each lead farmer is given a smart phone loaded with Tani Fund's app, which allows them to send photos and collect data about their crops. The digital element is in its early stages. (credits: UN SG's Special Advocate for Inclusive Finance / Flickr Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0))

    Check more

    Call for startup applications: Innovative solutions/technologies in the Agrifood & Water Tech landscape of West Africa

    The Corporate Innovation Challenge is a simple and exciting format that allows companies to work with startups over 2.5 days towards solving a specific challenge, defined by the corporate. In a moderated format, we combine the expertise of corporates with the agility and innovative power of startups to solve some of the most pressing challenges on the ground, therefore exposing them to new business areas.

    Our Focus Areas
    Agriculture Technologies
    Farm Management, Software, Sensing & IoT, Robotics, Mechanisation and Equipment, Novel Farming Systems, Agribusiness Marketplaces

    Food Technologies
    Next-Gen Food and Next-Gen Drinks, Farm-to-Table and Supply Chain, Food, Preservation systems

    Water Technologies
    Waste Water & Grey Water, Fresh Water, Water Infrastructure

    Application Deadline: May 31, 2019

    Illustration Photo: Spraying Pan3812 maize against army worm at Ndabibi Farm, Naivasha, Kenya (credits: CIMMYT / Peter Lowe / Flickr Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC 2.0))

    Check more

    Call for Nominations: The Norman Borlaug Award for exceptional, science-based achievement in international agriculture and food production

    The $10,000 Norman Borlaug Award for Field Research and Application, endowed by the Rockefeller Foundation, will be presented every October in Des Moines, Iowa, by the World Food Prize Foundation.

    This award will recognize exceptional, science-based achievement in international agriculture and food production by an individual under 40 who has clearly demonstrated intellectual courage, stamina, and determination in the fight to eliminate global hunger and poverty.

    The award will honor an individual who is working closely and directly “in the field” or at the production or processing level with farmers, animal herders, fishers or others in rural communities, in any discipline or enterprise across the entire food production, processing, and distribution chain.

    Dateline for submission: June 15, 2019

    Illustration Photo: Ears of orange maize lines following harvesting, on experimental plots at the Zambia Agriculture Research Institute (ZARI). This maize is orange because it contains high levels of beta-carotene, the same substance that give carrots their color. Beta-carotene is a provitamin, and is converted to vitamin A within the human body. CIMMYT works with ZARI as part of HarvestPlus, a CGIAR challenge program that uses biofortification to improve the nutritional value of staple foods. The HarvestPlus maize team uses conventional breeding to create maize hybrids and open-pollinated varieties rich in provitamin A. (credits: CIMMYT / Flickr Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0))

    Check more

    Call for Nominees for the 2019 Maize Youth Innovators Awards – Africa

    Nominations are now open for the 2019 MAIZE Youth Innovators Awards – Africa! These awards are part of the efforts that the CGIAR Research Program on Maize (MAIZE) is undertaking to promote youth participation in maize based agri-food systems. These awards recognize the contributions of young women and men below 35 years of age who are implementing innovations in African maize-based agri-food systems, including research-for-development, seed systems, agribusiness, and sustainable intensification.

    Young people are the key to ensuring a food-secure future and agricultural sustainability. However, rural youth face many challenges related to unemployment, underemployment and poverty. According to the FAO, facilitating young people’s participation in agriculture has the potential to drive widespread rural poverty reduction among young people and adults alike. In Africa, where over 300 million smallholder-farming families grow and consume maize as a staple crop, the human population stands at 1.2 billion people, 60 percent of whom are below the age of 25.

    Applications should be submitted via the online Application Form by March 15, 2019.

    Check more https://adalidda.com/posts/Zb6rv9jiiAXy6H98v/call-for-nominees-for-the-2019-maize-youth-innovators-awards
    Appel à candidatures: Le Prix de l'alimentation en Afrique (Africa Food Prize)

    Le Prix de l'alimentation en Afrique reconnaît les femmes, les hommes et les institutions extraordinaires dont les contributions remarquables à l'agriculture africaine ouvrent une nouvelle ère de sécurité alimentaire durable et d'opportunités économiques qui élèvent tous les Africains.

    Critères d'attribution

    Le comité du prix considère les critères suivants pour le prix:

    Contribution à la réduction de la pauvreté et de la faim et / ou à l'amélioration de la sécurité alimentaire et nutritionnelle de manière mesurable
    Contribution à la création d'une source vitale de revenu et / ou d'emploi en termes mesurables
    Potentiel de changement en transformation grâce à l'évolutivité, la reproductibilité et la durabilité
    Sensibilisation accrue et coopération entre le public et les organisations africaines
    Potentiel de leadership prouvé de l'individu ou de l'organisation, notamment sa capacité à persévérer malgré des défis ou des risques importants

    Date limite de soumission des candidatures (en anglais): 14 mai 2019

    Photo d'illustration: Le cultivateur de maïs Shadrack Mulua Milhuku est fier de la survie de son maïs hybride malgré les dégâts considérables causés par le ver et les éléphants sur les rives de la rivière Maangiuvungu près de Kiboko, Makueni, Kenya. (credits: CIMMYT / Peter Lowe / International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center / Flickr Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC 2.0))

    Lisez la suite https://fr.adalidda.com/posts/czcL2sJYnv9XvwsXj/appel-a-candidatures-le-prix-de-l-alimentation-en-afrique
    Call for Nominations: 2019 Africa Food Prize

    The Africa Food Prize recognizes extraordinary women, men, and institutions whose outstanding contributions to African agriculture are forging a new era of sustainable food security and economic opportunity that elevates all Africans.

    Award Criteria

    The Prize Committee considers the following criteria for the Prize:

    Contribution to reducing poverty and hunger and/or improving food and nutrition security in measurable terms
    Contribution to providing a vital source of income and/ or employment in measurable terms
    Potential for transformative change through scalability, replication, and sustainability
    Increased awareness and cooperation among African audiences and organizations
    Proven leadership potential of the individual or organization, specifically the ability of the to persevere despite significant challenges or risks

    Nominations must be submitted no later than 14 May 2019

    Illustration Photo: National Wheat Coordinator Dr. Ruth Wanyera gives a lesson to pathology interns in the field of a fungicide efficiency trial at KALRO Njoro Research Station, Nakuru, Kenya. (credits: CIMMYT / Peter Lowe / International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center / Flickr Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC 2.0))

    Check more https://adalidda.com/posts/YTJz5MNm6Ln57KdSJ/call-for-nominations-2019-africa-food-prize