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Search results for 'Barley'

  • Mike Imhoff United States, IL, Murphysboro

    Business Title: Imhoff Farms
    Job Title: Owner
    Interests: Corn, Soybeans, Wheat, Grain Sorghum, Beef Cattle, Cover Crops, Ag Issues in Washington, Precision Ag, Marketing, Agribusiness, Triticale Barley, Soil Health

    Dallas Dau Canada, Alberta, Three Hills

    Interests: Wheat, Canola, Beef Cattle, Precision Ag, Marketing, Agribusiness, Barley

    Rusty Stinn Canada, Alberta, Lethbridge

    Job Title: Agronomist
    Interests: Corn, Wheat, Canola, Precision Ag, Irrigation, Barley, Hemp, Timothy, Alfalfa

    Bob Forsyth United Kingdom, England, Hereford

    Interests: Wheat, Canola, Precision Ag, Irrigation, Marketing, Agribusiness, Potato, Barley

  • Mike Imhoff United States, IL, Murphysboro

    Business Title: Imhoff Farms
    Job Title: Owner
    Interests: Corn, Soybeans, Wheat, Grain Sorghum, Beef Cattle, Cover Crops, Ag Issues in Washington, Precision Ag, Marketing, Agribusiness, Triticale Barley, Soil Health

    Dallas Dau Canada, Alberta, Three Hills

    Interests: Wheat, Canola, Beef Cattle, Precision Ag, Marketing, Agribusiness, Barley

    Rusty Stinn Canada, Alberta, Lethbridge

    Job Title: Agronomist
    Interests: Corn, Wheat, Canola, Precision Ag, Irrigation, Barley, Hemp, Timothy, Alfalfa

    Bob Forsyth United Kingdom, England, Hereford

    Interests: Wheat, Canola, Precision Ag, Irrigation, Marketing, Agribusiness, Potato, Barley

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  • What Farmers Need to Know About Mycorrhizae

    By Laura Barrera

    Published 11 months ago

    If someone asked you, “How do plants take up the water and nutrients they need?” you’d probably tell them through the roots. But did you know that for many crops, those roots aren’t working alone?That’s because most plant species associate with mycorrhizal fungi. What is mycorrhizal fungi? University of Alberta biological scientist JC Cahill says that mycorrhizas are actually the interaction between a fungus and a plant. Although there are many different types of mycorrhizae, the only one crop farmers need to be concerned about is arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), as 65% of plant species associate with it... Grasses like sorghums, millets, rye, triticale, barleys — and oats in particular — are also excellent colonizers...

    Categories: Cover Crops

    Million Dollar Dirt

    By Amanda Allworth

    Published 1 years, 3 months ago

    Dirt. It’s arguably a farmer’s most valuable natural resource. But what makes some soils more productive than others? That’s a complicated question to answer, but we do know that the healthiest soils share some common characteristics. While some of these are difficult to change, there are management practices you can employ to improve soil quality... Adding grass, barley, legumes or wheat to your rotation can increase carbon availability in soil...

    Early Cover Crop Benefits: What Can You Expect in the First Year?

    By Laura Barrera

    Published 1 years, 4 months ago

    In 1995, Pennsylvania farmer Steve Groff was speaking at an event when he asked the audience the question: Do cover crops pay off?His thinking at the time was that he had been no-tilling since 1982, and maybe if he no-tilled long enough, he wouldn’t need them. Ray Weil, a soil ecologist with the University of Maryland, happened to hear his question and approached Groff about doing a cover crop study on his farm. It turned into a 12-year project, from 1995 to 2007. It was in 1999, four years into it, Groff got the answer to his question... Best cover crops to begin withFor farmers who are hoping for benefits from the get-go, Kladivko says grasses like cereal rye, wheat or barley, are good ones to start with because they grow faster and have fibrous roots...

    Categories: Cover Crops

    Should You Rotate Your Cover Crops? 4 Issues to Consider

    By Laura Barrera

    Published 1 years, 3 months ago

    You probably know that having a crop rotation is a good thing. Growing different crops back to back provides several benefits, such as preventing pests and disease, improving soil health and reducing fertilizer inputs, all of which can boost your crop yields and your bottom line. By adding cover crops to the mix, you’re diversifying your rotation even more. But have you thought about rotating your cover crops? Should you be using the same cover crop species back to back, year after year?Dave Robison, who runs the blog PlantCoverCrops... “And the next year we plant wheat and we don’t spray any grass killer, then we possibly end up with annual ryegrass in the wheat or malting barley or some other high-value crop...

    Categories: Cover Crops

    Why is soil salinization a problem?

    By Darren Chan

    Published 1 month ago

    What’s Soil SalinizationSoil salinization is one of the most vital soil problems for agricultural production. Salinization refers to the salt content of the level affecting agricultural and environmental health. Soil salinization usually occurs in arid areas, In these areas, soluble salt ions accumulate in the soil. In these areas where plant growth requires irrigation, the Evaporation and transpiration process leaves salt in the soil... Plant salt-tolerant cash crops such as barley, sunflowers, or canola...

    Categories: Agribusiness, Irrigation, Wheat

    Soil Farmers of the Year 2018

    By Direct Driller Magazine

    Published 8 months ago

    FARM WALKS WITH THE SOIL FARMERS OF THE YEAR 2018The winners of the FCCT Soil Farmer of the Year competition opened their gates over four days and provided a veritable masterclass in managing soils. Spanning a range of soil types, management systems and enterprises, attending farmers gained insights into their award winning management and a better understanding as to why these farms had been picked as the top three in this year’s competition. The Soil Farmer of the Year Competition, now in its third year, is run by the Farm Carbon Cutting Toolkit and Innovation for Agriculture... Following a look at the wheat, the group then moved on to look at a field of barley and talked about weed control, drainage, whether or not to apply gypsum and muck as well as the benefits of reduced tillage systems in the dry weather in terms of holding onto what little moisture was there. After another field of barley and more discussions about the importance of soil structure, drainage and encouraging the worms, the attendees gravitated towards the machinery and specifically Angus’ John Deere 750a...

    Categories: Cover Crops

    Uruguay now is now investing in USA farms; Read Why.

    By Robert Morgan

    Published 1 years, 4 months ago

    The MERCOSUR Member;Uruguay, with a much smaller landmass and population then either Brazil or Argentina has as the largest sector of its Agricultural production, principally producing Rice, Wheat, Corn, Barley, Livestock, Cattle and Fish, therefore contributing to the BLOC’s extensive Export Import Trade. Agrilend views Uruguay is set to experience a period of structurally lower growth in the coming years, as investment into expanding agricultural production and re-export capacity is tempered and foreign capital begins to flow into Argentina as the new Argentine government liberalizes its investment environment. Nonetheless, Uruguay will continue to outpace Latin America's average real GDP expansion as the country's middle class supports private consumption growth. Inflation will remain elevated over the coming years as the Banco Central Del Uruguay will not implement significant policy measures to stymie price increases. The bank will instead focus on attempts to spur growth and encourage consumption with low borrowing costs as tempered investment weighs on economic growth...

  • Posted By Robert Morgan
    1 years, 4 months ago

    https://agfuse.com/article/uruguay-now-is-now-investing-in-usa-farms-read-why-

    Posted By Cover Crops
    1 years, 4 months ago

    https://agfuse.com/article/early-cover-crop-benefits-what-can-you-expect-in-the-first-year-

    Posted By Laura Barrera
    1 years, 4 months ago

    https://agfuse.com/article/early-cover-crop-benefits-what-can-you-expect-in-the-first-year-

    Posted By Christopher Keen
    1 years, 1 month ago

    We should have some great news in the coming days from our Canadian friends that are using #GroAloe. They are currently using GroAloe on Wheat and Barley. From what I have been told, the results are such that the Canadian government has become interested in our product.
    Monitoring of crop fields using multispectral and thermal imagery from UAV

    Authors: Paulina Lyubenova Raeva, Jaroslav Šedina & Adam Dlesk

    Journal Title: European Journal of Remote Sensing

    ISSN: 2279-7254 (Online)

    Publisher: Taylor & Francis Group

    Society/Institution: Associazione Italiana di Telerilevamento (AIT)

    In the following paper, an application of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) for agricultural purposes will be presented. The field of interest to be monitored is situated in the Western part of the Czech Republic. It is located in the area of the Vysoké Sedlišt? village, close to the city of Planá. There are two main crops cultivated in the area – corn and barley. The surrounding territory is mostly covered with grass. The research team carried out numerous unmanned flights with a fixed-wing platform with two different sensors – multispectral and thermal. Three vegetation indices were computed. Moreover, two thermal maps are presented to indicate the relation between vegetation and soil temperature.

    Illustration Photo: Aerial view of a corn field (CC0 Creative Commons from Pixabay.com)

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    Posted By Canola Growers
    3 months ago

    https://www.producer.com/2019/06/less-canola-and-durum-more-barley-and-oats-in-canada/

    Posted By Ryan Sorrels
    3 months ago

    Got back to harvesnting barley tonight in central oklahoma......and it rained again tonight.

    Posted By Ryan Sorrels
    4 months ago

    The weather here in oklahoma has been absolutey bonker, so I felt very lucky to get in the field with the combine today and start harvesting barley.
    Morning #Grain Comments, #Corn, #Soybeans, #Wheat

    -Trade ideas for Statistics Canada planted area estimate report
    -Attache sees continued declining Chinese corn stocks, mixed demand ideas
    -Attache see lower Ukraine corn and wheat exports in 2019/20
    -Corn belt weather pattern remains active, but farmers to aggressively use opportunities
    -No USDA sales announcements

    * Statistics Canada will release their first 2019/20 planted acreage estimates on Wednesday. The average trade estimate of all wheat planted area is 24.8 million acres (22.8-25.6 million range of ideas) and would be nearly unchanged from last year’s 24.735 million acres. However, with durum area estimated at 5.2 million acres (4.6-6.0 million range), down sharply from last year’s 6.185 million, the obvious implication is spring wheat area is expected to increase from last year. Canola area is expected to decline to 21.8 million acres (20.1-22.4 million range) from last year’s 22.813 million acres, with oat area estimated to increase to 3.3 million acres (3.1-3.5 million range) from last year’s 3.053 million and barley to increase to 6.9 million acres (6.1-7.5 million range) from last year’s 6.493 million. Soybean area is estimated at 6.4 million acres (6.0-7.3 million range) vs 6.320 mil last year.
    * The USDA ag attaché in China issued their first ideas on the 2019/20 grain situation, reflecting expectations for corn production to be... To continue, Visit http://ccstrade.com/blog
    #Grain #Futures Comments

    -Heavy snow in western belt and very wet Delta keeps weather risk talk active
    -Argentine corn/soybean harvests advance uneventfully
    -USDA WASDE report tomorrow
    -Asian buyers securing new crop Black Sea corn/wheat supplies

    The USDA’s Crop Progress report this afternoon will included the first U.S.-wide corn planting progress update of the year. A wet pattern over the next 10 days or so will keep early planting concern talk active for much of the corn belt with heavy snow expected in western locations this week and notable rains from the Ohio River Valley through the mid-south and Delta keeping SRW concerns alive and well. The USDA will release the monthly WASDE supply/demand balance sheet report tomorrow at 11:00 AM CT. A summary of the trade estimates is on the following page. Our pre-report commentary/analysis can be found on Market Insights at https://portal.rjobrien.com/MarketInsights/Blog/Read/35509.

    * Argentina’s soybean harvest is 9% complete, mostly in line with average of 11%, but well behind last year’s historically fast harvest of 21% as a result of the very dry conditions. Their corn harvest is 20% complete vs 17% average and 29% last year. Brazil’s soybean harvest is 83% complete vs 77% average.
    * Iran’s state grain buying agency issued tenders to buy 300k tonnes of corn, 300k tonnes of SBM and 300k tonnes of barley for April-June shipment periods with offers due by tomorrow. In mid-March, a similar tender resulted in the purchase of 200k tonnes of each commodity.
    * South Korea bought 60k tonnes of corn over the weekend at $184.50/tonne c&f for April 25 arrival and expected to be South American origin.
    * SovEcon estimates Russia will export...
    To continue, Visit http://ccstrade.com/blog