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Search results for 'Barley'

  • Why is soil salinization a problem?

    By Darren Chan

    Published Aug 21, 2019 

    What’s Soil SalinizationSoil salinization is one of the most vital soil problems for agricultural production. Salinization refers to the salt content of the level affecting agricultural and environmental health. Soil salinization usually occurs in arid areas, In these areas, soluble salt ions accumulate in the soil. In these areas where plant growth requires irrigation, the Evaporation and transpiration process leaves salt in the soil... Plant salt-tolerant cash crops such as barley, sunflowers, or canola...

    Categories: Agribusiness, Irrigation, Wheat

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    What Farmers Need to Know About Mycorrhizae

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Nov 2, 2018 

    If someone asked you, “How do plants take up the water and nutrients they need?” you’d probably tell them through the roots. But did you know that for many crops, those roots aren’t working alone?That’s because most plant species associate with mycorrhizal fungi. What is mycorrhizal fungi? University of Alberta biological scientist JC Cahill says that mycorrhizas are actually the interaction between a fungus and a plant. Although there are many different types of mycorrhizae, the only one crop farmers need to be concerned about is arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), as 65% of plant species associate with it... Grasses like sorghums, millets, rye, triticale, barley — and oats in particular — are also excellent colonizers...

    Categories: Cover Crops

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    Root Exudates 101: What They Do and Why They Matter

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Mar 23, 2020 

    When you picture what’s happening below ground in your fields, you probably imagine a web of roots branching out to provide your crops support, nutrients and water. But root growth isn’t the only thing happening beneath the surface. Roots are also secreting chemical compounds, known as root exudates, which play an important role in both crop production and soil health. Released primarily from the root hairs and cells immediately behind the penetrating root tip, says an Agronomy for Sustainable Development article, root exudates attract and sustain a variety of microorganisms, like arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and nitrogen-cycling bacteria, in the rhizosphere, which is the zone of soil directly surrounding the roots... He’s studied the exudates of corn and barley and found corn’s root exudates were better in increasing how well soil particles bound together, and impacted soil water capture better than barley exudates...

    Categories: Cover Crops

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    Key Factor in Improving Soil Water Infiltration Rates: Living Roots

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Jan 22, 2020 

    Many farmers across the U. S. experienced wet weather last growing season. According to NOAA, the 12-month period between July 2018 and June 2019 set the precipitation record in the U... ”Barley, as it improves soil structure...

    Categories: Cover Crops

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    Early Cover Crop Benefits: What Can You Expect in the First Year?

    By Laura Barrera

    Published May 17, 2018 

    In 1995, Pennsylvania farmer Steve Groff was speaking at an event when he asked the audience the question: Do cover crops pay off?His thinking at the time was that he had been no-tilling since 1982, and maybe if he no-tilled long enough, he wouldn’t need them. Ray Weil, a soil ecologist with the University of Maryland, happened to hear his question and approached Groff about doing a cover crop study on his farm. It turned into a 12-year project, from 1995 to 2007. It was in 1999, four years into it, Groff got the answer to his question... Best cover crops to begin withFor farmers who are hoping for benefits from the get-go, Kladivko says grasses like cereal rye, wheat or barley, are good ones to start with because they grow faster and have fibrous roots...

    Categories: Cover Crops

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    Should You Rotate Your Cover Crops? 4 Issues to Consider

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Jun 15, 2018 

    You probably know that having a crop rotation is a good thing. Growing different crops back to back provides several benefits, such as preventing pests and disease, improving soil health and reducing fertilizer inputs, all of which can boost your crop yields and your bottom line. By adding cover crops to the mix, you’re diversifying your rotation even more. But have you thought about rotating your cover crops? Should you be using the same cover crop species back to back, year after year?Dave Robison, who runs the blog PlantCoverCrops... “And the next year we plant wheat and we don’t spray any grass killer, then we possibly end up with annual ryegrass in the wheat or malting barley or some other high-value crop...

    Categories: Cover Crops

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    Million Dollar Dirt

    By Amanda Allworth

    Published Jul 10, 2018 

    Dirt. It’s arguably a farmer’s most valuable natural resource. But what makes some soils more productive than others? That’s a complicated question to answer, but we do know that the healthiest soils share some common characteristics. While some of these are difficult to change, there are management practices you can employ to improve soil quality... Adding grass, barley, legumes or wheat to your rotation can increase carbon availability in soil...

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    Uruguay now is now investing in USA farms; Read Why.

    By Robert Morgan

    Published Jun 14, 2018 

    The MERCOSUR Member;Uruguay, with a much smaller landmass and population then either Brazil or Argentina has as the largest sector of its Agricultural production, principally producing Rice, Wheat, Corn, Barley, Livestock, Cattle and Fish, therefore contributing to the BLOC’s extensive Export Import Trade. Agrilend views Uruguay is set to experience a period of structurally lower growth in the coming years, as investment into expanding agricultural production and re-export capacity is tempered and foreign capital begins to flow into Argentina as the new Argentine government liberalizes its investment environment. Nonetheless, Uruguay will continue to outpace Latin America's average real GDP expansion as the country's middle class supports private consumption growth. Inflation will remain elevated over the coming years as the Banco Central Del Uruguay will not implement significant policy measures to stymie price increases. The bank will instead focus on attempts to spur growth and encourage consumption with low borrowing costs as tempered investment weighs on economic growth...

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    Soil Farmers of the Year 2018

    By Direct Driller Magazine

    Published Jan 19, 2019 

    FARM WALKS WITH THE SOIL FARMERS OF THE YEAR 2018The winners of the FCCT Soil Farmer of the Year competition opened their gates over four days and provided a veritable masterclass in managing soils. Spanning a range of soil types, management systems and enterprises, attending farmers gained insights into their award winning management and a better understanding as to why these farms had been picked as the top three in this year’s competition. The Soil Farmer of the Year Competition, now in its third year, is run by the Farm Carbon Cutting Toolkit and Innovation for Agriculture... Following a look at the wheat, the group then moved on to look at a field of barley and talked about weed control, drainage, whether or not to apply gypsum and muck as well as the benefits of reduced tillage systems in the dry weather in terms of holding onto what little moisture was there. After another field of barley and more discussions about the importance of soil structure, drainage and encouraging the worms, the attendees gravitated towards the machinery and specifically Angus’ John Deere 750a...

    Categories: Cover Crops

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    From Industrial Pesticides to Integrated Pest Management: A New Trend in Vineyard Practices

    By Thomas Grandperrin

    Updated Dec 14, 2020 

    This article was initially published on The Wine Industry Advisor as part of a series on biological control and Integrated Pest Management written by UAV-IQ Precision Agriculture. Grape growers are facing increased threats from invasive insect pests. The issue with those non-native species is that there are often no naturally occurring enemies capable of controlling them and new Integrated Pest Management (IPM) protocols might take years to be developed, forcing growers to rely on broad-spectrum insecticides until more ecologically friendly alternatives are available. A notable example of an invasive pest affecting California vineyards is the vine mealybug, which is a major pest of grape vines not only because of the damage they can cause to the fruit but also for the viruses they transmit, such as the grape leafroll-associated virus... He studied the use of barley, vetch, and clovers with Michael Costello, and more recently the use of phacelia, buckwheat and sweet alyssum with Houston Wilson...

    Categories: Organic Specialty Crops, Sustainable Agriculture

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  • Mick Humphries Australia, New South Wales, Moree

    Job Title: Farmer
    About: I'm a third generation farmer from the Moree area, Australia. Irrigated cotton is my main crop, however I also grow some wheat,barley,chick peas and sorghum as well.
    Interests: Cotton, Wheat, Sorghum, Cover Crops, Precision Agriculture, Irrigation, Marketing, Agribusiness

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  • Why is soil salinization a problem?

    By Darren Chan

    Published Aug 21, 2019 

    What’s Soil SalinizationSoil salinization is one of the most vital soil problems for agricultural production. Salinization refers to the salt content of the level affecting agricultural and environmental health. Soil salinization usually occurs in arid areas, In these areas, soluble salt ions accumulate in the soil. In these areas where plant growth requires irrigation, the Evaporation and transpiration process leaves salt in the soil... Plant salt-tolerant cash crops such as barley, sunflowers, or canola...

    Categories: Agribusiness, Irrigation, Wheat

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    What Farmers Need to Know About Mycorrhizae

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Nov 2, 2018 

    If someone asked you, “How do plants take up the water and nutrients they need?” you’d probably tell them through the roots. But did you know that for many crops, those roots aren’t working alone?That’s because most plant species associate with mycorrhizal fungi. What is mycorrhizal fungi? University of Alberta biological scientist JC Cahill says that mycorrhizas are actually the interaction between a fungus and a plant. Although there are many different types of mycorrhizae, the only one crop farmers need to be concerned about is arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), as 65% of plant species associate with it... Grasses like sorghums, millets, rye, triticale, barley — and oats in particular — are also excellent colonizers...

    Categories: Cover Crops

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    Root Exudates 101: What They Do and Why They Matter

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Mar 23, 2020 

    When you picture what’s happening below ground in your fields, you probably imagine a web of roots branching out to provide your crops support, nutrients and water. But root growth isn’t the only thing happening beneath the surface. Roots are also secreting chemical compounds, known as root exudates, which play an important role in both crop production and soil health. Released primarily from the root hairs and cells immediately behind the penetrating root tip, says an Agronomy for Sustainable Development article, root exudates attract and sustain a variety of microorganisms, like arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and nitrogen-cycling bacteria, in the rhizosphere, which is the zone of soil directly surrounding the roots... He’s studied the exudates of corn and barley and found corn’s root exudates were better in increasing how well soil particles bound together, and impacted soil water capture better than barley exudates...

    Categories: Cover Crops

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    Key Factor in Improving Soil Water Infiltration Rates: Living Roots

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Jan 22, 2020 

    Many farmers across the U. S. experienced wet weather last growing season. According to NOAA, the 12-month period between July 2018 and June 2019 set the precipitation record in the U... ”Barley, as it improves soil structure...

    Categories: Cover Crops

    11 Upvotes
    2 Comments
    5 Shares
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    Early Cover Crop Benefits: What Can You Expect in the First Year?

    By Laura Barrera

    Published May 17, 2018 

    In 1995, Pennsylvania farmer Steve Groff was speaking at an event when he asked the audience the question: Do cover crops pay off?His thinking at the time was that he had been no-tilling since 1982, and maybe if he no-tilled long enough, he wouldn’t need them. Ray Weil, a soil ecologist with the University of Maryland, happened to hear his question and approached Groff about doing a cover crop study on his farm. It turned into a 12-year project, from 1995 to 2007. It was in 1999, four years into it, Groff got the answer to his question... Best cover crops to begin withFor farmers who are hoping for benefits from the get-go, Kladivko says grasses like cereal rye, wheat or barley, are good ones to start with because they grow faster and have fibrous roots...

    Categories: Cover Crops

    4 Upvotes
    1 Comment
    8 Shares

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    Should You Rotate Your Cover Crops? 4 Issues to Consider

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Jun 15, 2018 

    You probably know that having a crop rotation is a good thing. Growing different crops back to back provides several benefits, such as preventing pests and disease, improving soil health and reducing fertilizer inputs, all of which can boost your crop yields and your bottom line. By adding cover crops to the mix, you’re diversifying your rotation even more. But have you thought about rotating your cover crops? Should you be using the same cover crop species back to back, year after year?Dave Robison, who runs the blog PlantCoverCrops... “And the next year we plant wheat and we don’t spray any grass killer, then we possibly end up with annual ryegrass in the wheat or malting barley or some other high-value crop...

    Categories: Cover Crops

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    Million Dollar Dirt

    By Amanda Allworth

    Published Jul 10, 2018 

    Dirt. It’s arguably a farmer’s most valuable natural resource. But what makes some soils more productive than others? That’s a complicated question to answer, but we do know that the healthiest soils share some common characteristics. While some of these are difficult to change, there are management practices you can employ to improve soil quality... Adding grass, barley, legumes or wheat to your rotation can increase carbon availability in soil...

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    Uruguay now is now investing in USA farms; Read Why.

    By Robert Morgan

    Published Jun 14, 2018 

    The MERCOSUR Member;Uruguay, with a much smaller landmass and population then either Brazil or Argentina has as the largest sector of its Agricultural production, principally producing Rice, Wheat, Corn, Barley, Livestock, Cattle and Fish, therefore contributing to the BLOC’s extensive Export Import Trade. Agrilend views Uruguay is set to experience a period of structurally lower growth in the coming years, as investment into expanding agricultural production and re-export capacity is tempered and foreign capital begins to flow into Argentina as the new Argentine government liberalizes its investment environment. Nonetheless, Uruguay will continue to outpace Latin America's average real GDP expansion as the country's middle class supports private consumption growth. Inflation will remain elevated over the coming years as the Banco Central Del Uruguay will not implement significant policy measures to stymie price increases. The bank will instead focus on attempts to spur growth and encourage consumption with low borrowing costs as tempered investment weighs on economic growth...

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    Soil Farmers of the Year 2018

    By Direct Driller Magazine

    Published Jan 19, 2019 

    FARM WALKS WITH THE SOIL FARMERS OF THE YEAR 2018The winners of the FCCT Soil Farmer of the Year competition opened their gates over four days and provided a veritable masterclass in managing soils. Spanning a range of soil types, management systems and enterprises, attending farmers gained insights into their award winning management and a better understanding as to why these farms had been picked as the top three in this year’s competition. The Soil Farmer of the Year Competition, now in its third year, is run by the Farm Carbon Cutting Toolkit and Innovation for Agriculture... Following a look at the wheat, the group then moved on to look at a field of barley and talked about weed control, drainage, whether or not to apply gypsum and muck as well as the benefits of reduced tillage systems in the dry weather in terms of holding onto what little moisture was there. After another field of barley and more discussions about the importance of soil structure, drainage and encouraging the worms, the attendees gravitated towards the machinery and specifically Angus’ John Deere 750a...

    Categories: Cover Crops

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    From Industrial Pesticides to Integrated Pest Management: A New Trend in Vineyard Practices

    By Thomas Grandperrin

    Updated Dec 14, 2020 

    This article was initially published on The Wine Industry Advisor as part of a series on biological control and Integrated Pest Management written by UAV-IQ Precision Agriculture. Grape growers are facing increased threats from invasive insect pests. The issue with those non-native species is that there are often no naturally occurring enemies capable of controlling them and new Integrated Pest Management (IPM) protocols might take years to be developed, forcing growers to rely on broad-spectrum insecticides until more ecologically friendly alternatives are available. A notable example of an invasive pest affecting California vineyards is the vine mealybug, which is a major pest of grape vines not only because of the damage they can cause to the fruit but also for the viruses they transmit, such as the grape leafroll-associated virus... He studied the use of barley, vetch, and clovers with Michael Costello, and more recently the use of phacelia, buckwheat and sweet alyssum with Houston Wilson...

    Categories: Organic Specialty Crops, Sustainable Agriculture

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  • Posted By Mick Humphries
    Oct 18, 2015 

    Barley harvest in full swing now. First field going over 2T/acre which is a good yield for this area. Crop is quite lodged though.
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    Posted By Becky Johnson
    Jul 16 

    "Fusarium head blight, which is also commonly known as scab, is a fungal disease of cereal crops, particularly small grains like wheat, rye, barley, and oats, and this disease is caused by mini fungi in the genre of Fusarium. But the most important in North America is Fusarium graminearum. And to be very honest, this pathogen not only affects production problems but also affects the quantity, as well as the quality of the grain, by producing the mycotoxins, which poses a serious concern if ingested by humans and animals."

    https://smallgrains.wsu.edu/wsu-wheat-beat-episode-110/

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    Posted By Canola Growers
    Jun 27, 2019 

    https://www.producer.com/2019/06/less-canola-and-durum-more-barley-and-oats-in-canada/

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    Posted By Wheat Producers
    Oct 10, 2018 

    http://ocj.com/2018/10/soybean-aphids-and-barley-yellow-dwarf-in-wheat/

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    Posted By AgFuse Administrator
    Sep 18, 2017 

    https://spectrum.ieee.org/automaton/robotics/industrial-robots/autonomous-robots-plant-tend-and-harvest-entire-crop-of-barley

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    Posted By Wheat Producers
    Apr 6, 2017 

    "The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Commodity Credit Corporation today announced the 2017 marketing assistance loan rates by county for wheat, corn, grain sorghum, barley, oats, soybeans and each “other oilseed” (canola, crambe, flaxseed, mustard seed, rapeseed, safflower, sesame seed and sunflower seed), loan rates by region for pulses (dry peas, lentils, small chickpeas and large chickpeas), and loan rates by state for rough rice. The rates are posted on the Farm Service Agency (FSA) website."
    http://agfax.com/2017/03/29/usda-announces-loan-rates-for-wheat-feed-grains-oilseeds-rice-pulse-crops/
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    Posted By AgFuse Administrator
    Feb 9, 2016 


    http://news.utcrops.com/2016/02/wheat-aphids-and-barley-yellow-dwarf-virus/

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    Posted By Sheila Hasselstrom
    May 11, 2020 

    3rd year in cover crop. Oats, Beardless Barley, Plantain, Chicory, Turnips, Radishes, with Red and White clover. Paddock Grazed by Sheep in July. Winchester Idaho. Now has a beautiful stand of permanent clover.
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    Posted By Ryan Sorrels
    Nov 27, 2019 

    Man I love Notilling into fields with lots of cover. Im harvesting soybeans while the suns out and sowing barley at night.
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    Posted By Ryan Sorrels
    Mar 6 

    Feeding the barley and killing the gophers
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