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11 Results

Search results for 'Cabbage'

  • Should You Rotate Your Cover Crops? 4 Issues to Consider

    By Laura Barrera

    Published 1 years, 3 months ago

    You probably know that having a crop rotation is a good thing. Growing different crops back to back provides several benefits, such as preventing pests and disease, improving soil health and reducing fertilizer inputs, all of which can boost your crop yields and your bottom line. By adding cover crops to the mix, you’re diversifying your rotation even more. But have you thought about rotating your cover crops? Should you be using the same cover crop species back to back, year after year?Dave Robison, who runs the blog PlantCoverCrops... ”Michigan State University Extension advises not planting oilseed radish as a cover crop on the same field for more than two years in a row, and avoiding it when growing cabbage, broccoli or radish for cash crops because of its susceptibility to the disease...

    Categories: Cover Crops

    3 ways to build soil crumb structure by yourself?

    By Darren Chan

    Published 1 years, 3 months ago

    In some plants,stems and leaves appear scorching and shrinking,and some even die. Some pest structures also change. This is what the performance of continuous cropping obstacle in different crops... As a result, some cotton will have potassium deficiency,some cabbage will have calcium deficiency, and some will suffer from Zinc Magnesium deficiency... The vegetables that are endangered include cabbage,cucumber,tomato,pepper,and radish...

    Categories: Agribusiness, Corn, Organic

    The Rise of The Organic Farm Market.

    By Robert Morgan

    Published 1 years, 3 months ago

    It for centuries was known that cattle which grazed where volcanic dust had settled would become ill and lame:: The reason was their high fluoride intake. Research in Iceland in 1970 showed that grass affected in this way would have a s much as 4300 p. p. m... Some crops, such as asparagus, beans, cabbage and carrots, are resistant to fluoride...

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  • Should You Rotate Your Cover Crops? 4 Issues to Consider

    By Laura Barrera

    Published 1 years, 3 months ago

    You probably know that having a crop rotation is a good thing. Growing different crops back to back provides several benefits, such as preventing pests and disease, improving soil health and reducing fertilizer inputs, all of which can boost your crop yields and your bottom line. By adding cover crops to the mix, you’re diversifying your rotation even more. But have you thought about rotating your cover crops? Should you be using the same cover crop species back to back, year after year?Dave Robison, who runs the blog PlantCoverCrops... ”Michigan State University Extension advises not planting oilseed radish as a cover crop on the same field for more than two years in a row, and avoiding it when growing cabbage, broccoli or radish for cash crops because of its susceptibility to the disease...

    Categories: Cover Crops

    3 ways to build soil crumb structure by yourself?

    By Darren Chan

    Published 1 years, 3 months ago

    In some plants,stems and leaves appear scorching and shrinking,and some even die. Some pest structures also change. This is what the performance of continuous cropping obstacle in different crops... As a result, some cotton will have potassium deficiency,some cabbage will have calcium deficiency, and some will suffer from Zinc Magnesium deficiency... The vegetables that are endangered include cabbage,cucumber,tomato,pepper,and radish...

    Categories: Agribusiness, Corn, Organic

    The Rise of The Organic Farm Market.

    By Robert Morgan

    Published 1 years, 3 months ago

    It for centuries was known that cattle which grazed where volcanic dust had settled would become ill and lame:: The reason was their high fluoride intake. Research in Iceland in 1970 showed that grass affected in this way would have a s much as 4300 p. p. m... Some crops, such as asparagus, beans, cabbage and carrots, are resistant to fluoride...

  • Posted By Accidental Agronomist
    12 months ago

    1. Harvest what you can, if at all possible
    2. Clear field of all debris, especially any affected plant material including weeds
    3. Send a sample to a pathology lab to confirm whether bacterial or fungal. I’m leaning toward fungal, anthracnosis, however, a positive identification is better than my gut feeling. With a positive id, you can then decide what, if any bactericide or fungicide would be most effective or even cost effective at this point. You won't necessarily see a pest that might be potentially causing problems. Sometimes going out at night with a flashlight you are able to catch them in the act.
    4. If you haven’t had a soil test done, do it now and see where the pH is. Sometimes a pH adjustment can go a long way in complementing cultural practices and treatments that need to be done as well. It has been shown that liming can inhibit spore development. You still need to know the pH to determine a source, rate, and if it is even an option. If you're sending a soil test out include pH, OM, CEC, macros, micros, and if possible base saturation. Might as well get it all at one time.
    5. You may need to rotate out of potatoes and cabbage. Maybe for several years. Or invest in treated seed or field transplants that have been fumigated.
    6. I’d also suggest cover cropping with something like oats or rye. Oats have been shown to sequester toxins in animals. I don’t have any scientific proof of their remedial capabilities in soils. I really wish I did though. Normally I would suggest mustard. However, I’m not sure what the efficacy would be in this case. It’s just a consideration at this point. I still think your best bet is pH, looking at drainage issues, rotating, and using disease-resistant/treated varieties.
    7. Usually, bacterial/fungal issues are exacerbated by wetter than normal seasons and poor drainage. If drainage is an ongoing issue you may need to look at taking steps to alleviate it such as tiling or amending. Map/note where drainage issues are and affected plants are
    8. There is a lot of good info. at Cornell's website about bactericides/fungicides regarding efficacy, rates, etc.
    9. My gut could be wrong a lab diagnosis is more definitive than my gut and catch-all terms.
    10. If you have more questions, don't hesitate to email me at theaccidentalagronomist@gmail.com. I respond quicker to emails.

    Posted By Darren Chan
    1 years, 3 months ago

    https://agfuse.com/article/3-ways-to-build-soil-crumb-structure-by-yourself-

    Posted By Vegetable Production
    1 month ago

    https://www.growingproduce.com/vegetables/compare-these-cabbage-varieties-production-details-to-find-the-right-ones-for-you/

    Posted By James Muritu
    12 months ago

    Thank you for your reply. It's showing similar pattern in different parts of my field and it has caused severe damage to my cabbages. The previous crop before the cabbage was potatoes for 2 years. I uproo to ed several of them and never found any sign of worms or insects. Let me send additional information via another photos.

    Posted By Pee Dee Crop Producer Reports
    1 years, 5 months ago

    https://scagnews.wordpress.com/2018/04/27/diamondback-moth-caterpillars-in-greens/

    Posted By Vegetable Production
    2 years, 3 months ago

    http://www.growingproduce.com/vegetables/16-cole-crop-varieties-for-2017/

    Posted By Vegetable Production
    2 years, 5 months ago

    "Before the widespread use of plastic mulch, drip irrigation, high tunnels and greenhouse production, there seemed to be a clear line of demarcation between vegetables that could be transplanted, and those that had to be seeded directly into the field. Grower innovations have nearly erased that line."
    http://vegetablegrowersnews.com/news/vegetables-will-transplanting-next/