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Search results for 'Cereal Rye'

  • How to Protect Corn Yields Following Cereal Rye

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Apr 19, 2019 

    If you’ve considered using cereal rye as a cover crop in front of corn, you’ve probably been warned that your yield would suffer... Research has shown that corn yields can take a hit after cereal rye, but it doesn’t happen every time... Pathogens at PlayOne of the reasons corn may suffer after cereal rye is if the rye is serving as a “green bridge,” where pathogens that were infecting the rye move onto the growing corn as the rye dies... The roots of corn following no cover crop (left) were much cleaner than the roots where cereal rye was terminated three days before planting (right)... How is that impacting the germinating seedling? If that germinating seedling is not getting enough nitrogen, is that predisposing it to Pythium infection?”What About Other Small Grains?Given the negative effects seen with cereal rye, you may be wondering if similar results would occur with other small grains...

    Categories: Corn, Cover Crops

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    Top 5 Reasons Why Black Oats Are The Best Beginner's Cover Crop

    By Cover Crops

    Published Sep 14, 2018 

    Also, black oats tiller faster than regular oats and other cereal grains, making them more forgiving in tough planting conditions... Black oats' C-to-N ratio is lower than that of cereal rye but has similar biomass tonnage. What does this mean? The lower C-to-N ratio will allow the black oats to break down quicker than cereal rye, returning valuable nutrients and organic particles back into your dirt that can be used by the crop immediately following the cover crops... I like cereal rye as a cover crop, too. But, one of the biggest problems farmers have with cereal rye cover crops is the speed at which they can get away from you...

    Categories: Cover Crops

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    When is it Too Late to Seed Cover Crops?

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Jan 29, 2019 

    Instead, Ebersole says wheat, triticale and cereal rye are some of the go-to species for late-seeding — according to Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education (SARE), cereal rye can germinate in soil temperatures as low as 34 degrees Fahrenheit, and needs at least 38 degrees to begin growing. If you’re planning on planting corn, you may want to avoid cereal rye and stick with either triticale or a legume like crimson clover or hairy vetch... While it may not get as much growth as seen in this photo, cereal rye is one of the best species for seeding late, as it can germinate in cold temperatures... For those going into soybeans, cereal rye can be a very good choice, he says. Dillard agrees that cereal rye would be best, but it’s also more expensive...

    Categories: Cover Crops

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    Struggling with Soil Temperature During Planting? Cover Crops Can Help

    By Laura Barrera

    Updated Aug 17, 2020 

    One was conducted with a three-way cover crop mix of hairy vetch, Austrian winter peas, and cereal rye on a no-till field in Missouri, while the other was conducted on a no-till field in Tennessee with just winter wheat... Haruna says he chose cereal rye, hairy vetch and Austrian winter peas for the Missouri study because those species are hardy and can be grown in different parts of the U... In that study, researchers looked at soil temperature and soil moisture on no-tilled and chisel plowed fields, where under each system they compared a winter rye cover crop compared to no cover... Soil temperature in the top two inches under no-till and chisel plow with and without rye cover crop on May 8, 2018... Source: Mahdi Al-Kaisi, Iowa State University Extension & OutreachThey also saw that soil moisture was higher under the no-till system, but less where the rye was...

    Categories: Cover Crops

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    Root Exudates 101: What They Do and Why They Matter

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Mar 23, 2020 

    When you picture what’s happening below ground in your fields, you probably imagine a web of roots branching out to provide your crops support, nutrients and water. But root growth isn’t the only thing happening beneath the surface. Roots are also secreting chemical compounds, known as root exudates, which play an important role in both crop production and soil health. Released primarily from the root hairs and cells immediately behind the penetrating root tip, says an Agronomy for Sustainable Development article, root exudates attract and sustain a variety of microorganisms, like arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and nitrogen-cycling bacteria, in the rhizosphere, which is the zone of soil directly surrounding the roots... University of Vermont says that cereal rye’s exudates inhibit germination and growth of weed seeds, while a study by researchers in Switzerland found that buckwheat’s inhibited pigweed root growth by 49%...

    Categories: Cover Crops

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    Can You Use Legume Cover Crops in Your Peanut Rotation?

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Aug 31, 2018 

    ”Instead, Balkcom recommends farmers use grasses before peanuts, particularly cereal rye... The seven cover crops were:Common vetch (legume)Hairy vetch (legume)White clover (legume)Red clover (legume)Triticale (grass)Wheat (grass)Rye (grass)While there were no significant differences between the two years in the uninfested field, on the infested field, grasses significantly reduced nematode populations and had significantly higher yields than the legume cover crops... Phatak, professor emeritus of horticulture at the University of Georgia, also shared in the SARE publication that the research staff successfully raised peanuts no-tilled into cereal rye for 6 years without fungicides... “For the cereals, we’ll apply some nitrogen, say up to 30 pounds or so, to try to boost that biomass production even further... Year 2Fall: Replant cereal rye or cahaba vetch, allow crimson or subclover hard seed to germinate...

    Categories: Cover Crops, Peanuts

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    Some growers may have had no option but to plant green — as shown above — into their cover crops this year because of poor weather conditions. In this photo by Ted Kornecki, USDA Agricultural Research Service, the farmer is terminating his cereal rye with a roller at the same time he is planting his cotton.

    How to Time Cover Crop Termination and Get an Effective Burndown

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Jul 1, 2019 

    Penn State Weed Management Extension Specialist John Wallace adds that he doesn't know any growers planting green into annual ryegrass because allowing it to get too big will make it more difficult to control... But for those who have never planted green before, it would be better to first try planting green into a grass, like cereal rye or triticale... Larson Agricultural Research Center, soybeans were planted green into cereal rye that was being rolled in the same pass... Glyphosate is the most common herbicide used, Wallace says, as it’s not only effective in burning down grass species like cereal rye, it will also help control winter annual weeds that may be in the field... If you have winter wheat, you may need a higher rate than if you had cereal rye...

    Categories: Cover Crops

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    How Cover Crops Affect Your Fertilizer Strategy

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Jun 29, 2018 

    When it comes to cover crops and nutrient management, a lot of the focus is on what cover crops can do for soil fertility. Depending on the species being used, they can prevent leftover nutrients from running off into waterways or even produce some fertilizer for future crop use. But how should farmers adjust their fertilizer practices for their cash crops following cover crops? John Pike, a contract researcher and cover crop specialist for the Zea Maize Foundation and IL Sustainable Agriculture Partnership, and a former Research Agronomist at the University of Illinois at Dixon Springs Research station, says that while there are some nuances that need to be planned for, the basic principles of soil fertility and crop management are much the same... For example, if a grower is using cereal rye and there is residual nitrogen from the previous cropping season in the soil, a good establishment of rye can hold that nitrogen, which will eventually be available for the next crop... Generally speaking, Pike says the longer the cover crop — especially cereal rye — is allowed to develop before termination, the greater the lignin formation in the biomass...

    Categories: Cover Crops

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    How Yield Champions Use Cover Crops for Growing Higher Bushels

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Jun 1, 2018 

    There are many factors that can influence corn yield. In fact, Fred Below, a plant physiologist at the University of Illinois, identified seven of them, which he dubbed the “Seven Wonders of the Corn Yield World. ”The seven wonders, ranked in order of most influence on yield, are:WeatherNitrogenHybridPrevious cropPlant populationTillageGrowth regulatorsWhile Below was referring to the cash crop rotation in the fourth wonder, some farmers are taking it one step further by seeding cover crops. The benefit of added crop diversity along with improvements to soil health is paying off, as some of these farmers are achieving the highest yields in the country... After the previous corn was harvested, the owner of JRH Grains LLC drilled a 7-way blend of cereal rye, triticale, oats, crimson clover, Austrian winter peas, hairy vetch and Dwarf essex rape...

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    Grasses like cereal rye are a good species for beginning cover crop users as they grow fast and have fibrous roots. Photo by Stephen Ausmus, USDA Agricultural Research Service.

    Early Cover Crop Benefits: What Can You Expect in the First Year?

    By Laura Barrera

    Published May 17, 2018 

    In 1995, Pennsylvania farmer Steve Groff was speaking at an event when he asked the audience the question: Do cover crops pay off?His thinking at the time was that he had been no-tilling since 1982, and maybe if he no-tilled long enough, he wouldn’t need them. Ray Weil, a soil ecologist with the University of Maryland, happened to hear his question and approached Groff about doing a cover crop study on his farm... Best cover crops to begin withFor farmers who are hoping for benefits from the get-go, Kladivko says grasses like cereal rye, wheat or barley, are good ones to start with because they grow faster and have fibrous roots... For growers looking for some additional weed control, Groff says that cereal rye before soybeans is a good fit. In fact, the Cover Crop Survey Report specifically asked respondents about their experience with cereal rye on herbicide-resistant weed control, and 25% said they always see improved control following cereal rye and 44% reporting “sometimes...

    Categories: Cover Crops

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  • Jay Brandt United States, OH, Carroll

    About: Farm 1000 acres corn, beans, cereal rye with my father 100% no-till. Co-owner of Walnut Creek Seeds (cover crop and organic corn and beans) with my wife and father.
    Interests: Corn, Soybeans, Wheat, Beef, Poultry, Swine, Cover Crops, Precision Agriculture, Organic Row Crops, Marketing, Agribusiness, Cereal Rye

    SUNCUE Grain Dryer Taiwan, Taiwan, Taichung

    Business Title: SUNCUE
    Job Title: Grain Drying Consultant
    About: SUNCUE has been continuously inventing pioneered drying technology over the past 50 years. Pursuing lowest drying cost, producing highest quality grain, providing greatest benefit to farmers.
    Interests: Corn, Peanuts, Soybeans, Rice, Canola, Sorghum, Poultry, Organic Row Crops, Marketing, Agribusiness

    Bello Haruna Nigeria, Oyo State, Ibadan

    Business Title: National Cereals Research Institute, Badeggi Nigeria
    Job Title: Farmer, Farm Manager or Employee, Crop Consultant, Extension Agent or University Employee, Farmer's Spouse or Family Member, Ag Investor, Precision Agriculture Specialist
    Interests: Corn, Organic Row Crops, Rice, Sorghum, Soybeans, Wheat, Crop Protection, Fertility, Irrigation, Soil Health, Sustainable Agriculture, Apps, Precision Agriculture, Marketing, News, Ag Policy, Agribusiness, Farm Management, Human Resources, Operating a Farm, Succession Planning, Projects, Purchasing, Shops, Tools, Conservation Plans, Cover Crops

    Nery Earnhart United States, Indiana, Kimmell

    Interests: Corn, Soybeans

  • Grain Dryer

    Public
    Grain Dryer & Grain Drying Technology
    Interest: Corn, Cotton, Peanuts, Soybeans, Wheat, Vegetables, Rice, Canola, Sorghum, Poultry, Cover Crops, Marketing, Agribusiness

    Paddy Dryer

    Public
    paddy dryer information
    Interest: Agribusiness, Marketing, Organic Row Crops, Rice

  • How to Protect Corn Yields Following Cereal Rye

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Apr 19, 2019 

    If you’ve considered using cereal rye as a cover crop in front of corn, you’ve probably been warned that your yield would suffer... Research has shown that corn yields can take a hit after cereal rye, but it doesn’t happen every time... Pathogens at PlayOne of the reasons corn may suffer after cereal rye is if the rye is serving as a “green bridge,” where pathogens that were infecting the rye move onto the growing corn as the rye dies... The roots of corn following no cover crop (left) were much cleaner than the roots where cereal rye was terminated three days before planting (right)... How is that impacting the germinating seedling? If that germinating seedling is not getting enough nitrogen, is that predisposing it to Pythium infection?”What About Other Small Grains?Given the negative effects seen with cereal rye, you may be wondering if similar results would occur with other small grains...

    Categories: Corn, Cover Crops

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    Top 5 Reasons Why Black Oats Are The Best Beginner's Cover Crop

    By Cover Crops

    Published Sep 14, 2018 

    Also, black oats tiller faster than regular oats and other cereal grains, making them more forgiving in tough planting conditions... Black oats' C-to-N ratio is lower than that of cereal rye but has similar biomass tonnage. What does this mean? The lower C-to-N ratio will allow the black oats to break down quicker than cereal rye, returning valuable nutrients and organic particles back into your dirt that can be used by the crop immediately following the cover crops... I like cereal rye as a cover crop, too. But, one of the biggest problems farmers have with cereal rye cover crops is the speed at which they can get away from you...

    Categories: Cover Crops

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    When is it Too Late to Seed Cover Crops?

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Jan 29, 2019 

    Instead, Ebersole says wheat, triticale and cereal rye are some of the go-to species for late-seeding — according to Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education (SARE), cereal rye can germinate in soil temperatures as low as 34 degrees Fahrenheit, and needs at least 38 degrees to begin growing. If you’re planning on planting corn, you may want to avoid cereal rye and stick with either triticale or a legume like crimson clover or hairy vetch... While it may not get as much growth as seen in this photo, cereal rye is one of the best species for seeding late, as it can germinate in cold temperatures... For those going into soybeans, cereal rye can be a very good choice, he says. Dillard agrees that cereal rye would be best, but it’s also more expensive...

    Categories: Cover Crops

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    Struggling with Soil Temperature During Planting? Cover Crops Can Help

    By Laura Barrera

    Updated Aug 17, 2020 

    One was conducted with a three-way cover crop mix of hairy vetch, Austrian winter peas, and cereal rye on a no-till field in Missouri, while the other was conducted on a no-till field in Tennessee with just winter wheat... Haruna says he chose cereal rye, hairy vetch and Austrian winter peas for the Missouri study because those species are hardy and can be grown in different parts of the U... In that study, researchers looked at soil temperature and soil moisture on no-tilled and chisel plowed fields, where under each system they compared a winter rye cover crop compared to no cover... Soil temperature in the top two inches under no-till and chisel plow with and without rye cover crop on May 8, 2018... Source: Mahdi Al-Kaisi, Iowa State University Extension & OutreachThey also saw that soil moisture was higher under the no-till system, but less where the rye was...

    Categories: Cover Crops

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    Root Exudates 101: What They Do and Why They Matter

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Mar 23, 2020 

    When you picture what’s happening below ground in your fields, you probably imagine a web of roots branching out to provide your crops support, nutrients and water. But root growth isn’t the only thing happening beneath the surface. Roots are also secreting chemical compounds, known as root exudates, which play an important role in both crop production and soil health. Released primarily from the root hairs and cells immediately behind the penetrating root tip, says an Agronomy for Sustainable Development article, root exudates attract and sustain a variety of microorganisms, like arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and nitrogen-cycling bacteria, in the rhizosphere, which is the zone of soil directly surrounding the roots... University of Vermont says that cereal rye’s exudates inhibit germination and growth of weed seeds, while a study by researchers in Switzerland found that buckwheat’s inhibited pigweed root growth by 49%...

    Categories: Cover Crops

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    Can You Use Legume Cover Crops in Your Peanut Rotation?

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Aug 31, 2018 

    ”Instead, Balkcom recommends farmers use grasses before peanuts, particularly cereal rye... The seven cover crops were:Common vetch (legume)Hairy vetch (legume)White clover (legume)Red clover (legume)Triticale (grass)Wheat (grass)Rye (grass)While there were no significant differences between the two years in the uninfested field, on the infested field, grasses significantly reduced nematode populations and had significantly higher yields than the legume cover crops... Phatak, professor emeritus of horticulture at the University of Georgia, also shared in the SARE publication that the research staff successfully raised peanuts no-tilled into cereal rye for 6 years without fungicides... “For the cereals, we’ll apply some nitrogen, say up to 30 pounds or so, to try to boost that biomass production even further... Year 2Fall: Replant cereal rye or cahaba vetch, allow crimson or subclover hard seed to germinate...

    Categories: Cover Crops, Peanuts

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    Some growers may have had no option but to plant green — as shown above — into their cover crops this year because of poor weather conditions. In this photo by Ted Kornecki, USDA Agricultural Research Service, the farmer is terminating his cereal rye with a roller at the same time he is planting his cotton.

    How to Time Cover Crop Termination and Get an Effective Burndown

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Jul 1, 2019 

    Penn State Weed Management Extension Specialist John Wallace adds that he doesn't know any growers planting green into annual ryegrass because allowing it to get too big will make it more difficult to control... But for those who have never planted green before, it would be better to first try planting green into a grass, like cereal rye or triticale... Larson Agricultural Research Center, soybeans were planted green into cereal rye that was being rolled in the same pass... Glyphosate is the most common herbicide used, Wallace says, as it’s not only effective in burning down grass species like cereal rye, it will also help control winter annual weeds that may be in the field... If you have winter wheat, you may need a higher rate than if you had cereal rye...

    Categories: Cover Crops

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    How Cover Crops Affect Your Fertilizer Strategy

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Jun 29, 2018 

    When it comes to cover crops and nutrient management, a lot of the focus is on what cover crops can do for soil fertility. Depending on the species being used, they can prevent leftover nutrients from running off into waterways or even produce some fertilizer for future crop use. But how should farmers adjust their fertilizer practices for their cash crops following cover crops? John Pike, a contract researcher and cover crop specialist for the Zea Maize Foundation and IL Sustainable Agriculture Partnership, and a former Research Agronomist at the University of Illinois at Dixon Springs Research station, says that while there are some nuances that need to be planned for, the basic principles of soil fertility and crop management are much the same... For example, if a grower is using cereal rye and there is residual nitrogen from the previous cropping season in the soil, a good establishment of rye can hold that nitrogen, which will eventually be available for the next crop... Generally speaking, Pike says the longer the cover crop — especially cereal rye — is allowed to develop before termination, the greater the lignin formation in the biomass...

    Categories: Cover Crops

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    How Yield Champions Use Cover Crops for Growing Higher Bushels

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Jun 1, 2018 

    There are many factors that can influence corn yield. In fact, Fred Below, a plant physiologist at the University of Illinois, identified seven of them, which he dubbed the “Seven Wonders of the Corn Yield World. ”The seven wonders, ranked in order of most influence on yield, are:WeatherNitrogenHybridPrevious cropPlant populationTillageGrowth regulatorsWhile Below was referring to the cash crop rotation in the fourth wonder, some farmers are taking it one step further by seeding cover crops. The benefit of added crop diversity along with improvements to soil health is paying off, as some of these farmers are achieving the highest yields in the country... After the previous corn was harvested, the owner of JRH Grains LLC drilled a 7-way blend of cereal rye, triticale, oats, crimson clover, Austrian winter peas, hairy vetch and Dwarf essex rape...

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    Grasses like cereal rye are a good species for beginning cover crop users as they grow fast and have fibrous roots. Photo by Stephen Ausmus, USDA Agricultural Research Service.

    Early Cover Crop Benefits: What Can You Expect in the First Year?

    By Laura Barrera

    Published May 17, 2018 

    In 1995, Pennsylvania farmer Steve Groff was speaking at an event when he asked the audience the question: Do cover crops pay off?His thinking at the time was that he had been no-tilling since 1982, and maybe if he no-tilled long enough, he wouldn’t need them. Ray Weil, a soil ecologist with the University of Maryland, happened to hear his question and approached Groff about doing a cover crop study on his farm... Best cover crops to begin withFor farmers who are hoping for benefits from the get-go, Kladivko says grasses like cereal rye, wheat or barley, are good ones to start with because they grow faster and have fibrous roots... For growers looking for some additional weed control, Groff says that cereal rye before soybeans is a good fit. In fact, the Cover Crop Survey Report specifically asked respondents about their experience with cereal rye on herbicide-resistant weed control, and 25% said they always see improved control following cereal rye and 44% reporting “sometimes...

    Categories: Cover Crops

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  • cover cropping with triticale ,hairy vetch and cow peas late fall?

    By Brady Shortell

    Published Oct 18, 2020 

    Looking at planting triticale with hairy vetch and cow peas for a cover crop next year for a cash crop or corn to be planted late May 2021 using a roller crimper to terminate the cover crop before plant. It’s October 18th, I won’t be able to plant until the 22nd. Night time temps have fluctuated from mid 30s to high 20s no consistency yet. Some nights stay closer to 40. Highs are in the 70s and 80s. Am I too late for any of my covers? Any suggestions on planting rates? Will triticale terminate properly if I follow the method used for Rye, waiting until the entire field is dropping pollen?

    Categories: Organic Specialty Crops, Cover Crops

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  • Posted By Matt Conatser
    Dec 31, 2015 

    Cereal rye and tillage radish cover crops on our research farm!
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    Posted By Willis Jepson
    Dec 18, 2017 

    Cereal rye, oats, crimson, hybrid radish & winter peas.
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    Posted By Laura Barrera
    Apr 19, 2019 

    https://agfuse.com/article/how-to-protect-corn-yields-following-cereal-rye
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    Posted By Cover Crops
    Mar 28, 2017 

    "Some farmers may curse heavy clay soils, but the Toussaint family is finding a way to manage these tough soils using roots instead of iron. Cereal rye as a cover crop and a much wider crop rotation have allowed the Wahpeton, North Dakota, farmers to biologically improve the soil in just two years."
    http://agfax.com/2017/03/21/183281
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    Posted By Fertility And Soils
    Nov 2, 2016 

    "Planting a cover crop this winter is a conservation practice that can pay dividends to your farm and to the environment. Cereal rye cover crops are proven to improve soil health, decrease nutrient runoff and soil loss, provide erosion control and reduce weed pressure."
    http://www.agriculture.com/crops/corn/sponsored-growing-the-benefits-of-cover-crops

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    Posted By Cover Crops
    Sep 27, 2016 

    "Cereal rye is a time-tested cover crop. But are farmers overlooking its utility as a feed or food crop?"
    http://www.agweb.com/article/think-beyond-ryes-cover-crop-potential-naa-ben-potter/
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    Posted By Jay Brandt
    May 4, 2020 

    12 way mix planted after cereal rye harvest last July. About half have over wintered.
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    Posted By Denise Schwab
    Apr 19 

    Pairs spring grazing cereal rye in eastern Iowa
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    Posted By Denise Schwab
    Apr 22 

    A pair grazing cereal rye in eastern Iowa.
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    Posted By Jay Brandt
    May 2, 2019 

    Crimson clover starting to flower 5/1 in Central Ohio. Mix includes Fixation Balansa, Hairy Verch and Cereal Rye. Was planted after oat harvest with peas, radish and sunflowers which all winter killed.
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