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Search results for 'England'

  • Gordon England United States, PA, Williamsburg

    Business Title: Penn England LLC
    Interests: Cover Crops, Precision Agriculture, Corn, Soybeans, Wheat, Dairy

    Laurie England

    Interests:

    Disney thwarts DeSantis' oversight board takeover using bizarre legal tie to King Charles III of England

    By Kak Keane

    Published Apr 1 

    The Walt Disney Co. , amid its feud with Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis, invoked King Charles III in its attempt to stifle efforts by the Republican governor to strip the company of its self-governance power in the state. In February, after nearly a year of lawmakers working to dissolve Disney's special tax district, DeSantis signed a bill into law that ends Disney’s self-governing power and puts the media giant under the control of a state board... (AaronP/Bauer-Griffin/GC, Scott Olson via Getty Images)[This] Declaration shall continue in effect until 21 years after the death of the last survivor of the descendants of King Charles III, King of England, living as of the date of this declaration, the document stated, referencing language used most often in the United Kingdom...

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    Brett Lee United Kingdom, England, Aldeburgh

    Job Title: Farmer, Farm Manager or Employee, Precision Agriculture Specialist, Other Ag Professional
    Interests: Marketing, Accounting and Bookkeeping, Farm Management, Operating a Farm, Succession Planning, Projects, Fishing, Homesteading, Hunting, Timber

    Brian Mckay United Kingdom, England, Buckland

    Business Title: BDH
    Job Title: Other Ag Professional, Educational Services
    Interests: Telemetry, Marketing, Accounting and Bookkeeping, Agribusiness, Human Resources, Projects, Tools, Homesteading

    Wreide Poole United Kingdom, England, Lincoln

    Job Title: Other Ag Professional, Developer
    Interests: Accounting and Bookkeeping, Farm Management, Farmland and Real Estate, Succession Planning, Conservation Easements

    Cheri Crystal United Kingdom, England, London

    Business Title: Cv Writing Service
    Job Title: Other Ag Professional, HR professional
    About: Cheri is an HR Manager with over 7 years of experience in the field. Passionate advocate for the development and success of people in the workplace. She has extensive experience in recruitment, onboarding, employee relations, and performance management.
    Interests: Cover Crops

    Anthony Barker United Kingdom, England, Sleaford

    Business Title: Barworth Agriculture
    Job Title: Crop Consultant
    Interests: Corn, Wheat, Beef, Feed, Crop Protection, Crop Scouting, Fertility, Irrigation, Soil Health, Sustainable Agriculture, Apps, Cover Crops, Vegetables

    Michael Dunn United Kingdom, England, Holsworthy

    Business Title: Dunn Design And Agriculture Amalgamated Formally DASQ Dunn Design Agriculture Squared
    Job Title: Precision Agriculture Specialist
    Interests: Corn, Organic Row Crops, Rice

  • Gordon England United States, PA, Williamsburg

    Business Title: Penn England LLC
    Interests: Cover Crops, Precision Agriculture, Corn, Soybeans, Wheat, Dairy

    Laurie England

    Interests:

    Brett Lee United Kingdom, England, Aldeburgh

    Job Title: Farmer, Farm Manager or Employee, Precision Agriculture Specialist, Other Ag Professional
    Interests: Marketing, Accounting and Bookkeeping, Farm Management, Operating a Farm, Succession Planning, Projects, Fishing, Homesteading, Hunting, Timber

    Brian Mckay United Kingdom, England, Buckland

    Business Title: BDH
    Job Title: Other Ag Professional, Educational Services
    Interests: Telemetry, Marketing, Accounting and Bookkeeping, Agribusiness, Human Resources, Projects, Tools, Homesteading

    Wreide Poole United Kingdom, England, Lincoln

    Job Title: Other Ag Professional, Developer
    Interests: Accounting and Bookkeeping, Farm Management, Farmland and Real Estate, Succession Planning, Conservation Easements

    Cheri Crystal United Kingdom, England, London

    Business Title: Cv Writing Service
    Job Title: Other Ag Professional, HR professional
    About: Cheri is an HR Manager with over 7 years of experience in the field. Passionate advocate for the development and success of people in the workplace. She has extensive experience in recruitment, onboarding, employee relations, and performance management.
    Interests: Cover Crops

    Anthony Barker United Kingdom, England, Sleaford

    Business Title: Barworth Agriculture
    Job Title: Crop Consultant
    Interests: Corn, Wheat, Beef, Feed, Crop Protection, Crop Scouting, Fertility, Irrigation, Soil Health, Sustainable Agriculture, Apps, Cover Crops, Vegetables

    Michael Dunn United Kingdom, England, Holsworthy

    Business Title: Dunn Design And Agriculture Amalgamated Formally DASQ Dunn Design Agriculture Squared
    Job Title: Precision Agriculture Specialist
    Interests: Corn, Organic Row Crops, Rice

    Chris Fellows United Kingdom, England, Lichfield

    Business Title: AgriWebMedia Ltd
    Interests: Wheat, Cover Crops, Marketing, Agribusiness

  • Disney thwarts DeSantis' oversight board takeover using bizarre legal tie to King Charles III of England

    By Kak Keane

    Published Apr 1 

    The Walt Disney Co. , amid its feud with Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis, invoked King Charles III in its attempt to stifle efforts by the Republican governor to strip the company of its self-governance power in the state. In February, after nearly a year of lawmakers working to dissolve Disney's special tax district, DeSantis signed a bill into law that ends Disney’s self-governing power and puts the media giant under the control of a state board... (AaronP/Bauer-Griffin/GC, Scott Olson via Getty Images)[This] Declaration shall continue in effect until 21 years after the death of the last survivor of the descendants of King Charles III, King of England, living as of the date of this declaration, the document stated, referencing language used most often in the United Kingdom...

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    Starting from Scratch - How Beginning Farmers can Break Ground

    By Gregory Heilers

    Published Sep 9, 2018 

    Despite the fact that there is near-guaranteed job security, thanks to booming population growth, many beginning farmers face seemingly insurmountable obstacles to bringing a product to market. In this article, we’re going to cover how young farmers can start from the ground up, even if they don’t come from a family of farmers. Informing this subject is Jason Silverman, the Massachusetts Field Agent of Land For Good, and Joel Salatin, co-owner of Polyface Farm. Jason’s experience as a first generation farmer, and as an agent connecting farmers with resources, balances well with Joel’s, who took over the family farm, and has since mentored scores of intern cohorts... Land For Good’s work includes helping beginning farmers in New England “think through these options, such as rental agreements, to better allow them to start a farm on a financial scale they feel comfortable with...

    Categories: Agribusiness

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    Health Insurance - Options for one of America's most dangerous occupations

    By John Moody

    Published Apr 14, 2018 

    DPC New England Innovative, Affordable Primary Care Worldwide, statistics are not much different... DPC New England Innovative, Affordable Primary Care So, farmers more than many others need insurance, both health and life... DPC New England Innovative, Affordable Primary Care Even if this is you, you never know when things may change employment wise, so knowing your options may save you some stress in the future... DPC New England Innovative, Affordable Primary Care Baling Twine and pocket knives - going no insuranceI did a survey on a major farm FB group that has almost 20,000 members... Also, some regions, like New England, have entire multi-state networks forming around more affordable care options that seek to remove the confusion and costs of insurance from the equation...

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    21st Century American Ag: Sourcing Successors and Finding Farmland

    By Gregory Heilers

    Published Jul 26, 2018 

    It’s no secret that America’s farmers are aging. In the last 35 years, the average age of American farmers has risen more than eight years to over 58 years-old. While the U... ” Jason found that “community support isn't a problem in New England… but, financial ability can be difficult... ” What Happens When a Farming Couple Retires? Jason lives in New England, “where development pressure is very high...

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    United Kingdom Seed Coating Material Market : Exploring Opportunities with Market Size and Growth Projections

    By Ikcch Zglria

    Published Mar 29 

    The rising adoption of genetically modified seeds drives the growth of the United Kingdom seed coating materials Market over the forecasted period. According to TechSci report, “The United Kingdom Seed Coating Materials Market - By Region, Competition Forecast & Opportunities, 2027”, the United Kingdom seed coating materials market is anticipated to propel with a remarkable CAGR during the forecast period of 2023-2027, owing to the growing demands higher production of healthier, nutritive, and premium agricultural food products. The Important Aspects of the United Kingdom Seed Coating Material MarketThe rapidly growing agricultural sector in the region due to low investment requirements is also providing a positive thrust to the market. Furthermore, the growing consumer and government preferences toward sustainable agriculture are adding to the market growth... The United Kingdom seed coating materials market analysis also studies the regional segmentation to devise regional market segmentation, divided among England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland...

    Categories: Peanuts

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    United Kingdom Organic Farming Market | Latest Research Reveals Key Trends for Business Growth

    By Ikcch Zglria

    Published Mar 29 

    The rising adulteration rate and the deteriorating quality of food are expected to drive the growth of the United Kingdom organic farming market over the forecast period. According to TechSci report on, “United Kingdom Organic Farming Market - By Region, Competition Forecast & Opportunities, 2027” The market growth can be attributed to the surging demand for organic food products by the United Kingdom population. A recent report shows major growth in organic farming in the United Kingdom, increasing by 3. 6 percent from the previous year, following a growth of 0... Moreover, to fuel this, earlier this year, the government of the United Kingdom announced that it will double the previous rates for farmers in England who would convert conventional farming to organic farming...

    Categories: Organic Specialty Crops

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    Contradictions & Conflicting Goals in Food & Energy Policy

    By North American Ag

    Published Mar 21 

    Listen to the podcast here - https://www. northamericanag. com/north-american-ag-spotlight - Contradictions & Conflicting Goals in Food & Energy PolicyIn this week's North American Ag Spotlight the President of American Agri-Women Heather Hampton+Knodle joins Chrissy Wozniak in the first discussion in a series about ag policy. Heather has agreed to be on the show every six to eight weeks to give us an update on what's happening in Washington and across the US in terms of ag policy, how it impacts the agriculture industry and how we can help... of Illinois, including an academic year at the University of Nottingham, England and exchange with St...

    Categories: Ag Commentary, Ag Policy, Sustainable Agriculture

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    North America Lampposts Market Size, Share and Trends Analysis Report By Product, By Application, By Region, And Segment Forecasts, 2023-2030

    By Aditi Divan

    Published Jan 17 

    New Jersey, United States,- The Lampposts Market is carefully studied in the report while broadly focusing on the key players and their business tactics, geographic expansion, market segments, competitive landscape, manufacturing, and price & cost structures. Each section of the research study is specially prepared to examine key aspects of the Lampposts market. For example, the market dynamics section dives deeper into the Lampposts market drivers, restraints, trends, and opportunities. With qualitative and quantitative analysis, we help you to conduct thorough and comprehensive research of the Lampposts market... The research study includes profiles of leading companies operating in the Lampposts Market:Paradise Garden Lighting, Patio Living Concepts, New England Arbors, Gama Sonic, iGuzzini, Mallatite, Valmont Industries, CU Phosco, Pemco Lighting, Lumca, I...

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    Collagen Market Industry – Global Top Players Growth Drivers & New Opportunities

    By Mit K

    Published Jan 10 

    The global collagen market size is estimated to be valued at USD 4. 1 billion in 2021 and is projected to reach USD 5. 3 billion by 2026, recording a CAGR of 5. 4% during the forecast period in terms of value... Organizations such as the FAO and WHO, governments such as that of Canada, and departments and agencies of governments such as Public Health England (PHE) of the Government of the UK have promoted healthy eating...

    Categories: News

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    Insect Cell Expression Systems Market Size, Analytical Overview, Growth Factors, Demand, Trends and Forecast to 2028

    By Dany Marco Marco

    Published Jan 4 

    New Jersey, United States,- Insect Cell Expression Systems Market research report highlights global, and regional. Country-level market size, development, and forecast period include market share by region, leading players with company profile, product introduction, market position including their market status, development trend by types and application that will provide its price and profit status, and marketing status and market growth drivers. Furthermore, the report covers the top 10 regions and top 50 countries across the globe to give a precise picture of the market that enables you to understand market performance. The research report includes specific segments by region (country), by manufacturers, by Type and by Application... , Bio-Rad Laboratories, GenScript Biotech Corporation, Lucigen Corporation, Synthetic Genomics Inc, Promega Corporation, New England Biolabs, SengenicsThe study report offers a comprehensive analysis of Insect Cell Expression Systems Market size across the globe as regional and country-level market size analysis, CAGR estimation of market growth during the forecast period, revenue, key drivers, competitive background, and sales analysis of the payers...

    Categories: Agribusiness

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  • Posted By Kak Keane
    Apr 1 

    https://agfuse.com/article/disney-thwarts-desantis-oversight-board-takeover-using-bizarre-legal-tie-to-king-charles-iii-of-en

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    Posted By Poultry Farming
    Mar 24, 2017 

    "An organic egg farm in England has set up a novel method of protecting its hens from bird flu allowing them to stay outdoors. Chris McCullough investigates."
    http://www.thepoultrysite.com/poultrynews/38274/poultry-farm-sets-up-lasers-to-guard-its-organic-hens-from-bird-flu/
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    Posted By Dairy Farming
    Oct 27, 2016 


    http://www.dairyherd.com/news/industry/first-robotic-rotary-england-starts-milking-cows
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    Posted By Mark Smith
    Feb 1, 2021 

    #AgHistory
    Ever wonder when field drainage was developed, or where drainage tile got its name? The earliest I can find reference to was from translated works of Palladius, (Rutilius Taurus Aemilianus Palladius) the fourth century agricultural writer. His works were translated from Latin in the early 15th century. The Romans and later the British, used to dig trenches and fill with stones, pebbles, straw, or hedge branches (with the butts of the branches pointing towards the outflow). Where trees were available, they were hollowed out to form drains, with some apparently lasting nearly 2 centuries). There is actually quite a bit written about this subject and later includes mentioning digging clay out of a trench, placing a tapered wooden roll into the trench, then tamping the clay around the roll, then removing this large dowel or ‘roll’. Later, the British academy of Arts sponsored a competition for the development of trenching plows. As you might expect, the size, weight and horsepower necessary to pull such an implement through heavy clay soil was significant and costly. The lords of the land continued to rely on the more traditional labor intensive methods of hand digging. By the end of the 18th century, drainage spades were still in use (and often, modern versions can be found for sale in Europe), and clay tiles set in place, then covered. By the 19th century, a variety of specially shaped bricks were being made to specifically form pipe drains. What really forced a systematic approach to field drainage was the end of the agricultural depression brought on by England’s war with Napoleon. It was later determined by the ‘Committee on Agricultural Distress’ around 1836 that the only means to improve yields at the time was to fully develop agricultural drainage, and several companies were created that specifically produced tile to be used for drainage of agricultural land. As we all know, drainage tile continued to evolve and is still in use to this very day.
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    Posted By Mark Smith
    May 24, 2021 

    #AgHistory This is one I think you will find interesting - the history of transportation costs, and the impact of the Eerie Canal on wheat flour prices in New York. From 1800-1840, most roads to market were little more than tracks through the woods, where the trees had been cleared but the stumps, a foot to a foot and a half high, remained. Imagine hauling a loaded wagon over this! Henry Carter Adams (Professor of economics at University of Michigan) wrote in 1899, it would take two ox teams 3 days to travel 25 miles. In Indiana, it cost 50 cents for every 100 pounds, per each 20 miles traveled. At these rates, corn could not be shipped more than 20 miles before it was grown at a loss. Wheat could not be profitably transported more than 50-75 miles. In 1825 things began to change with the opening of the Eerie canal. According to Israel D. Andrews in a report to the Secretary of the Treasury on the 'Trade of the Great Lakes and Rivers' "Previous to the opening of the canal, transportation from Lake Eerie to tide-water was such as to prevent all movement of merchandise" "The cost to transport from Buffalo to New York was $100/ton and took about 20 days at a cost of nearly 3 times the market value of wheat in New York, 6 times the value of corn, 12 times the value of oats", and far exceeded the value of most cured provisions. Because of the Eerie canal, western wheat was being used in New England by both farmers and 'city folks'. David Field, a historian for Berkshire County, Massachusetts, recorded in 1829 that the local cultivation of wheat and rye had diminished with the opening the Eerie canal, with more wheat being transported at cheaper cost into the county than what could be grown and transported out of it. Clearly, the market value of any agricultural commodity, and its availability to consumers, will always have transportation costs imbedded into the market value. As was demonstrated with cereal grains in New England, history shows us that when transportation costs exceed market value, then that commodity will eventually disappear form the market, or will never arrive in the first place. The New England Farmer printed in 1838-39 "If more fertile regions can supply our cities with grain at a cheaper rate than we can, let us not lament. We shall find full employment in furnishing what cannot be so well transported from a distance. Fresh meats, butter, hay and the small market vegetables must be supplied by the farmers of New England."
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    Posted By Treely
    Jul 26, 2017 

    View Treely's Slade Gleaton's article for SC Tree Farm News, July 2017 edition: "A Changing Future for Small Private Timberland Owners in South Carolina"The forest products industry in South Carolina has come a long way since England laid claim to the territory in the 17th century. Over the years, large timberland holdings have been responsible for sustaining the forest products economy through naval stores, lumber, and paper. Today the forest products industry contributes over $21 billion to the South Carolina economy and continues to grow stronger each year. As we look forward, one of the challenges the industry faces in South Carolina is the growing fragmentation of timberland ownership. Today, forested timberlands cover approximately two thirds of the state (over 12 million acres). Nearly 75% of this total is owned by non-industrial, private landowners. When you break this down further and look at the family owned timberland component, there are nearly 7 million acres across the State, of which over 3 million acres are composed of parcels of 50 acres or less. That’s a lot of acreage and tonnage spread across a growing segment of small forest landowners. Why is this happening? A recent study from Clemson University points to death (and subsequent sale or inheritance of property), urbanization, rising incomes and regulatory uncertainty as the main reasons for larger timber tracts being split into smaller parcels. “Across the South, where poverty and minority land ownership is prevalent, small landowners continue to struggle and large tracts continue to be sub-divided by heirs due to death, taxes and poor estate planning,” says Sam Cook, Executive Director of Forest Assets with the Natural Resources Foundation at NC State University, and recent recipient of the Henry Hardtner Award, which recognizes contributions to forest stewardship and sustainable forest management on non-industrial private lands. These smaller parcels are sometimes taken out of timber production or are not managed as effectively as they were in the past. In addition, the smaller landowner is often faced with the difficulty of selling timber because the smaller volumes are often too costly to harvest. “I own around 20 acres and when I decided to sell my timber, it was very difficult to find a buyer who was interested in harvesting my small acreage,” shares Joe Wheeler, a landowner in Chesterfield County. From the buyer perspective, it boils down to efficiency and profit margin. “Today’s loggers have more efficient and expensive equipment. Moving equipment between smaller tracts leads to a loss in productivity that puts pressure on already thin profit margins,” adds Jeff Tant with White Wood, Inc. “Even though there is no clear path to figuring out small tracts, one day a solution will be found and this will be a real plus to the industry.” One possible solution to smaller acreage parcels may be found online. As our world becomes more...
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    Posted By Mark Smith
    May 3, 2021 

    #AgHistory Agriculture is about food, fuel, and fiber, and how these are critical to our society. In particular, this week I will share what I hope is an interesting history of hemp (fiber) and its history here in the United States. Note that our country still imports billions of dollars in hemp fiber each year (https://www.ers.usda.gov/webdocs/publications/41740/15867_ages001e_1_.pdf?v=0), and our U.S. Navy still uses this imported hemp rope, canvas and line. There are several synthetic products that have one or two superior qualities, but no synthetic possesses the 'whole package' - durable, salt water and UV resistant, rot resistant, breaking strength, etc. In fact, Purdue University has identified hemp fiber as potentially one crop that can 'save' American Agriculture as sustainable crop which is comparable to Sudan grass as a cover crop, as well as an alternate to other synthetic fibers. I happen to agree (https://hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/ncnu02/pdf/small.pdf). First, growing fiber for local use was common in England and it should be no surprise that hemp (fiber)was one of the first crops in New England, New York and Pennsylvania. One of the earliest laws of Connecticut required every family to raise half a pound of hemp or flax. The amount grown varied and was largely dependent on the ability of the population to prepare, spin, and weave fiber. In New England, the population was very reliant on cotton imported from the West Indies until the introduction of linen spinning wheel as well as the immigration of Scotch-Irish who were very skilled in linen spinning and the manufacture of linen, in the early 1700's. Lest one think this an easy process, please know that it is very labor intensive. In spite of this, New England farmers were bent on finding a staple that could be sold to a wide market. None the less, the volume of hemp necessary to sell to a wide market was never achieved and the crop failed as a staple as it had to compete with limited arable and cleared land being used to grow grain crops. It was noted in the book 'American Husbandry' (1775) "...it is not for want of good land in certain quantities, nor the climate, that prevents the export of hemp, but the demand for it in Philadelphia..." In 1840 most experts of the time believed that Kentucky and Missouri led hemp production with Indiana, Illinois, and Ohio following. Americans forget how reliant we are as a society on fiber, and this came into glaring focus when the Japanese invasions of the pacific islands during WWII blocked our traditional supply routes for fiber. Every hemp seed available in the U.S. was placed under armed guard in Kentucky as a national security and war effort concern. USDA Hemp for Victory - (https://youtu.be/bIxFhYVv_Gk). Additionally, every farmer should read the Purdue report and consider the impact of this commodity on our society.

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    Posted By Robert James Yardley
    Dec 24, 2015 

    New to AgFuse so here we go!
    We're in the UK, located in the North West of England. Recently adopted Striptillage & cover crops.
    These were sown 2nd week in September and we're very pleased with the results, can't wait to go straight in with the drill in spring!
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    Posted By Mark Smith
    Updated Sep 15, 2022 

    "Data in agriculture is ubiquitous, data science is not. Despite the significant amount of time, energy, and money to collect data, the promise of data driven agriculture continues to prove illusive." https://agribusiness.purdue.edu/program/purdue-food-and-agribusiness-executive-summit/?inf_contact_key=5a7c1f8ccdbae889484a513f992731fbf651f238aa2edbb9c8b7cff03e0b16a0. I would recommend caution, however, when 'executives' discuss political buzz words such as equity. For example, equity in wheat distribution viz-a-viz New England and the Mid-west, after the Eerie Canal was completed and facilitated cheaper shipping from the Mid-west, would have caused wheat flour prices in New York rise exponentially due the the exceptional logistics cost of shipping wheat/flour from New England. Logistics is based on geography and resources. Food is also colorblind, and a sweet potato, regardless of where it is grown (or by whom), would require the exact same nutrient and water requirements. Its time for an injection of common sense into our agriculture leadership. If the data discssed cannot assist in pinpointing these requirements, then it is the collection of data, simply to collect data, with no end-state in mind.
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    Posted By Mark Smith
    Updated Nov 1, 2021 

    #AgHistory; Folks, this post is primarily in response to a question I received from farmer @Metin Ozsavran regarding pre-WWII pesticides. It is something each farmer should be able to discuss at a basic level but is not common knowledge. I assure you misperceptions about pre-WWII pesticides are currently being taught at the collegiate level (the implication in many current textbooks being that pre-WWII methods were safer for people than post-WWII). I ran across these misperceptions myself in two different Ag texts (in my classes) and these will continue to affect Ag policies in the future, since many environmental policy advisors and aides will also have read these same books. I do think you will find it interesting since I previously posted that pesticides date back thousands of years. Fast-forward to the 1800's in the United States and Europe: In the 1860's, the potato beetle was moving westward and decimating crops. During this time, someone began using 'Paris green', an arsenic based chemical used to color paint and textiles. Later, 'London purple' was used (another arsenical compound). A friend who is an expert in traditional textile making had mentioned these compounds were eventually banned in the textile industry after being identified as the cause of several deaths. I have not had time to find the source information on this but have no reason to doubt its veracity. These arsenical compounds were used to combat a variety of chewing insects, and kerosene-soap emulsions for sucking insects during this timeframe.Lead arsenate was used in 1892 to combat the the gypsy moth in New England, leading to powdered lead arsenate for the boll weevil on cotton, leading to calcium arsenate as a more effective version against the boll weevil in 1916. Hydrocyanic acid gas was used on citrus in 1886, and naphthalene on grapes in 1882. As populations grew, the greater intensity of agriculture drew greater pests resulting in heavier applications. Western pears were banned in Boston in 1919 due to excessive residues, and a few years later, Britain would not accept apple shipments from the United States for the same reason. The USDA eventually set up arsenic residue tolerances in 1927, and these were adjusted to lower levels than previously set in 1932 (to 0.01 grains/pound). DDT was invented in 1874 by German chemist Othman Zeidler, and became famous when Swiss chemist Paul Muller discovered its insecticidal value around 1939. I will post more as time and research permits, but the take-away is to always ask 'WHY' civilization adopted certain pesticides, and ensure we do not assume that reverting back to previous methods will somehow result in improvement. The best place to validate the above information (and much more) in one source is the 1962 USDA Agricultural Yearbook celebrating 100 years in agricultural innovation. Will share more as time (and AgFuse number counts) permits.
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