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Search results for 'England'

  • Gordon England United States, PA, Williamsburg

    Business Title: Penn England LLC
    Interests: Cover Crops, Precision Agriculture, Corn, Soybeans, Wheat, Dairy

    Laurie England

    Interests:

    Katherine Sayer United Kingdom, England, Twickenham

    Job Title: Ag Investor
    Interests: Apps

    Future Loans United Kingdom, England, Albrighton

    Job Title: Farmer, Rancher, Ag Investor, Precision Agriculture Specialist, Extension Agent or University Employee, Other Ag Professional
    Interests: Soybeans, Grass-Fed Livestock, Specialty Livestock

    Olivia Godber United Kingdom, England, Worksop

    Job Title: Extension Agent or University Employee
    Interests: Dairy, Feed, Grass-Fed Livestock, Beef, Fertility, Sustainable Agriculture, Soil Health, Apps, Precision Agriculture, Cover Crops

    Stewart Setter United Kingdom, England, Ipswich

    Business Title: FarmServices.online
    Interests:

  • Gordon England United States, PA, Williamsburg

    Business Title: Penn England LLC
    Interests: Cover Crops, Precision Agriculture, Corn, Soybeans, Wheat, Dairy

    Laurie England

    Interests:

    Katherine Sayer United Kingdom, England, Twickenham

    Job Title: Ag Investor
    Interests: Apps

    Future Loans United Kingdom, England, Albrighton

    Job Title: Farmer, Rancher, Ag Investor, Precision Agriculture Specialist, Extension Agent or University Employee, Other Ag Professional
    Interests: Soybeans, Grass-Fed Livestock, Specialty Livestock

    Olivia Godber United Kingdom, England, Worksop

    Job Title: Extension Agent or University Employee
    Interests: Dairy, Feed, Grass-Fed Livestock, Beef, Fertility, Sustainable Agriculture, Soil Health, Apps, Precision Agriculture, Cover Crops

    Stewart Setter United Kingdom, England, Ipswich

    Business Title: FarmServices.online
    Interests:

    Duncan Connabeer United Kingdom, England, Holbeach

    Business Title: Hutchinsons
    Interests:

  • Starting from Scratch - How Beginning Farmers can Break Ground

    By Gregory Heilers

    Published Sep 9, 2018 

    Despite the fact that there is near-guaranteed job security, thanks to booming population growth, many beginning farmers face seemingly insurmountable obstacles to bringing a product to market. In this article, we’re going to cover how young farmers can start from the ground up, even if they don’t come from a family of farmers. Informing this subject is Jason Silverman, the Massachusetts Field Agent of Land For Good, and Joel Salatin, co-owner of Polyface Farm. Jason’s experience as a first generation farmer, and as an agent connecting farmers with resources, balances well with Joel’s, who took over the family farm, and has since mentored scores of intern cohorts... Land For Good’s work includes helping beginning farmers in New England “think through these options, such as rental agreements, to better allow them to start a farm on a financial scale they feel comfortable with...

    Categories: Agribusiness

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    21st Century American Ag: Sourcing Successors and Finding Farmland

    By Gregory Heilers

    Published Jul 26, 2018 

    It’s no secret that America’s farmers are aging. In the last 35 years, the average age of American farmers has risen more than eight years to over 58 years-old. While the U... ” Jason found that “community support isn't a problem in New England… but, financial ability can be difficult... ” What Happens When a Farming Couple Retires? Jason lives in New England, “where development pressure is very high...

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    Health Insurance - Options for one of America's most dangerous occupations

    By John Moody

    Published Apr 14, 2018 

    DPC New England Innovative, Affordable Primary Care Worldwide, statistics are not much different... DPC New England Innovative, Affordable Primary Care So, farmers more than many others need insurance, both health and life... DPC New England Innovative, Affordable Primary Care Even if this is you, you never know when things may change employment wise, so knowing your options may save you some stress in the future... DPC New England Innovative, Affordable Primary Care Baling Twine and pocket knives - going no insuranceI did a survey on a major farm FB group that has almost 20,000 members... Also, some regions, like New England, have entire multi-state networks forming around more affordable care options that seek to remove the confusion and costs of insurance from the equation...

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  • Posted By John Moody
    Apr 14, 2018 

    https://agfuse.com/article/health-insurance---options-for-one-of-america-039-s-most-dangerous-occupations
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    Posted By Treely
    Jul 26, 2017 

    View Treely's Slade Gleaton's article for SC Tree Farm News, July 2017 edition: "A Changing Future for Small Private Timberland Owners in South Carolina"The forest products industry in South Carolina has come a long way since England laid claim to the territory in the 17th century. Over the years, large timberland holdings have been responsible for sustaining the forest products economy through naval stores, lumber, and paper. Today the forest products industry contributes over $21 billion to the South Carolina economy and continues to grow stronger each year. As we look forward, one of the challenges the industry faces in South Carolina is the growing fragmentation of timberland ownership. Today, forested timberlands cover approximately two thirds of the state (over 12 million acres). Nearly 75% of this total is owned by non-industrial, private landowners. When you break this down further and look at the family owned timberland component, there are nearly 7 million acres across the State, of which over 3 million acres are composed of parcels of 50 acres or less. That’s a lot of acreage and tonnage spread across a growing segment of small forest landowners. Why is this happening? A recent study from Clemson University points to death (and subsequent sale or inheritance of property), urbanization, rising incomes and regulatory uncertainty as the main reasons for larger timber tracts being split into smaller parcels. “Across the South, where poverty and minority land ownership is prevalent, small landowners continue to struggle and large tracts continue to be sub-divided by heirs due to death, taxes and poor estate planning,” says Sam Cook, Executive Director of Forest Assets with the Natural Resources Foundation at NC State University, and recent recipient of the Henry Hardtner Award, which recognizes contributions to forest stewardship and sustainable forest management on non-industrial private lands. These smaller parcels are sometimes taken out of timber production or are not managed as effectively as they were in the past. In addition, the smaller landowner is often faced with the difficulty of selling timber because the smaller volumes are often too costly to harvest. “I own around 20 acres and when I decided to sell my timber, it was very difficult to find a buyer who was interested in harvesting my small acreage,” shares Joe Wheeler, a landowner in Chesterfield County. From the buyer perspective, it boils down to efficiency and profit margin. “Today’s loggers have more efficient and expensive equipment. Moving equipment between smaller tracts leads to a loss in productivity that puts pressure on already thin profit margins,” adds Jeff Tant with White Wood, Inc. “Even though there is no clear path to figuring out small tracts, one day a solution will be found and this will be a real plus to the industry.” One possible solution to smaller acreage parcels may be found online. As our world becomes more...
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    Posted By Mark Smith
    May 3 

    #AgHistory Agriculture is about food, fuel, and fiber, and how these are critical to our society. In particular, this week I will share what I hope is an interesting history of hemp (fiber) and its history here in the United States. Note that our country still imports billions of dollars in hemp fiber each year (https://www.ers.usda.gov/webdocs/publications/41740/15867_ages001e_1_.pdf?v=0), and our U.S. Navy still uses this imported hemp rope, canvas and line. There are several synthetic products that have one or two superior qualities, but no synthetic possesses the 'whole package' - durable, salt water and UV resistant, rot resistant, breaking strength, etc. In fact, Purdue University has identified hemp fiber as potentially one crop that can 'save' American Agriculture as sustainable crop which is comparable to Sudan grass as a cover crop, as well as an alternate to other synthetic fibers. I happen to agree (https://hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/ncnu02/pdf/small.pdf). First, growing fiber for local use was common in England and it should be no surprise that hemp (fiber)was one of the first crops in New England, New York and Pennsylvania. One of the earliest laws of Connecticut required every family to raise half a pound of hemp or flax. The amount grown varied and was largely dependent on the ability of the population to prepare, spin, and weave fiber. In New England, the population was very reliant on cotton imported from the West Indies until the introduction of linen spinning wheel as well as the immigration of Scotch-Irish who were very skilled in linen spinning and the manufacture of linen, in the early 1700's. Lest one think this an easy process, please know that it is very labor intensive. In spite of this, New England farmers were bent on finding a staple that could be sold to a wide market. None the less, the volume of hemp necessary to sell to a wide market was never achieved and the crop failed as a staple as it had to compete with limited arable and cleared land being used to grow grain crops. It was noted in the book 'American Husbandry' (1775) "...it is not for want of good land in certain quantities, nor the climate, that prevents the export of hemp, but the demand for it in Philadelphia..." In 1840 most experts of the time believed that Kentucky and Missouri led hemp production with Indiana, Illinois, and Ohio following. Americans forget how reliant we are as a society on fiber, and this came into glaring focus when the Japanese invasions of the pacific islands during WWII blocked our traditional supply routes for fiber. Every hemp seed available in the U.S. was placed under armed guard in Kentucky as a national security and war effort concern. USDA Hemp for Victory - (https://youtu.be/bIxFhYVv_Gk). Additionally, every farmer should read the Purdue report and consider the impact of this commodity on our society.

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    https://agfuse.com/article/health-insurance---options-for-one-of-america-039-s-most-dangerous-occupations
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    Posted By Mark Smith
    Feb 1 

    #AgHistory
    Ever wonder when field drainage was developed, or where drainage tile got its name? The earliest I can find reference to was from translated works of Palladius, (Rutilius Taurus Aemilianus Palladius) the fourth century agricultural writer. His works were translated from Latin in the early 15th century. The Romans and later the British, used to dig trenches and fill with stones, pebbles, straw, or hedge branches (with the butts of the branches pointing towards the outflow). Where trees were available, they were hollowed out to form drains, with some apparently lasting nearly 2 centuries). There is actually quite a bit written about this subject and later includes mentioning digging clay out of a trench, placing a tapered wooden roll into the trench, then tamping the clay around the roll, then removing this large dowel or ‘roll’. Later, the British academy of Arts sponsored a competition for the development of trenching plows. As you might expect, the size, weight and horsepower necessary to pull such an implement through heavy clay soil was significant and costly. The lords of the land continued to rely on the more traditional labor intensive methods of hand digging. By the end of the 18th century, drainage spades were still in use (and often, modern versions can be found for sale in Europe), and clay tiles set in place, then covered. By the 19th century, a variety of specially shaped bricks were being made to specifically form pipe drains. What really forced a systematic approach to field drainage was the end of the agricultural depression brought on by England’s war with Napoleon. It was later determined by the ‘Committee on Agricultural Distress’ around 1836 that the only means to improve yields at the time was to fully develop agricultural drainage, and several companies were created that specifically produced tile to be used for drainage of agricultural land. As we all know, drainage tile continued to evolve and is still in use to this very day.

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    Posted By Mike Donovan
    Aug 17, 2020 

    40 acres of some good feed for cattle growing near th office of Practical Farm Ideas  www.farmideas.co.uk  in Herefordshire, England. The roots are already 8ins dia and the crop will continue to grow well before harvest in two months time. Processing the roots with a home designed / built root chopper is featured in https://bit.ly/33Zdt3L  the new issue. Much faster and a more even chop than you get from any diet feeder wagon. It does 3/4 ton in about a minute. 

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    Posted By Dairy Farming
    Sep 6, 2019 

    https://www.dairyherd.com/article/cows-go-wireless-dairy-farm-future

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    Personal Food Computer: A new device for controlled-environment agriculture

    Authors: Author: Castelló Ferrer Eduardo, Rye Jake, Brander Gordon, Savas Tim, Chambers Douglas, England Hildreth, Harper Caleb

    Rights: Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 ;


    Terms of Re-use: CC-BY-NC-SA
    Content Provider: DSpace@MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)

    Due to their interdisciplinary nature, devices for controlled-environment agriculture have the possibility to turn into ideal tools not only to conduct research on plant phenology but also to create curricula in a wide range of disciplines. Controlled-environment devices are increasing their functionalities as well as improving their accessibility. Traditionally, building one of these devices from scratch implies knowledge in fields such as mechanical engineering, digital electronics, programming, and energy management. However, the requirements of an effective controlled-environment device for personal use brings new constraints and challenges. This paper presents the OpenAg Personal Food Computer (PFC); a low cost desktop size platform, which not only targets plant phenology researchers but also hobbyists, makers, and teachers from elementary to high-school levels (K-12). The PFC is completely open-source and it is intended to become a tool that can be used for collective data sharing and plant growth analysis. Thanks to its modular design, the PFC can be used in a large spectrum of activities.

    Photo: Personal Food Computer (PFC) v2.0 alpha (2016). Credit: Open Agriculture Initiative, MIT Media Lab (openag.mit.edu CC-BY-SA 4.0)

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    Posted By Cotton News
    Apr 7, 2017 

    "It may sound unusual to hear that a New England-based company wants to cause a disruption in the cotton industry with a new seed treatment, but David Perry, CEO of agtech startup Indigo, says his company is up to the challenge."
    http://www.agweb.com/article/a-seed-treatment-that-improves-water-use-efficiency-naa-ben-potter/

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    Posted By Poultry Farming
    Mar 24, 2017 

    "An organic egg farm in England has set up a novel method of protecting its hens from bird flu allowing them to stay outdoors. Chris McCullough investigates."
    http://www.thepoultrysite.com/poultrynews/38274/poultry-farm-sets-up-lasers-to-guard-its-organic-hens-from-bird-flu/

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