Advertisement

37 Results

Search results for 'Germany'

  • Vijayalaxmi Kinhal Germany, Hesse, Greifenstein

    Business Title: Freelance Science Communicator
    Job Title: Writer
    Interests: Agribusiness, Marketing, Organic Row Crops, Precision Agriculture

    Nes Abdi Germany, Land Berlin, Berlin

    Business Title: Inland
    Job Title: Farmer, Landowner, Ag Investor, Crop Consultant
    Interests: Corn, Organic Row Crops, Peanuts, Rice, Sorghum, Wheat, Beef, Dairy, Feed, Poultry, Crop Scouting, Fertility, Irrigation, Soil Health

    Linda Wiesner Germany, Baden-Wi¼rttemberg Region, Stuttgart

    Job Title: Extension Agent or University Employee
    Interests: Swine

    Ioanna Smith Germany, Baden-Wi¼rttemberg Region, Aalen

    Interests: Canola

    Harmon Walter Germany, Bremen, Bremerhaven

    Interests: Organic Row Crops, Timber, Agribusiness

    Michael Reber Germany, Baden-Wi¼rttemberg Region, Schwi¤bisch Hall

    Interests: Corn, Soybeans, Wheat, Sorghum, Poultry, Swine, Cover Crops, Ag Policy, Organic Row Crops, Agribusiness, Triticale Ryegrass Clover

    Dmitrij Schwedöw Germany, Bavaria, Mitwitz

    Interests: Corn, Cotton, Rice, Beef, Dairy, Poultry, Swine, Ag Policy, Marketing, Agribusiness

    Eli Glazer Germany, Hesse, Bad Soden am Taunus

    Interests: Precision Agriculture, Irrigation, Agribusiness

    Gerardo Lopez Germany, Lower Saxony, Gottingen

    Interests: Precision Agriculture, Marketing, Smart Farming

  • Vijayalaxmi Kinhal Germany, Hesse, Greifenstein

    Business Title: Freelance Science Communicator
    Job Title: Writer
    Interests: Agribusiness, Marketing, Organic Row Crops, Precision Agriculture

    Nes Abdi Germany, Land Berlin, Berlin

    Business Title: Inland
    Job Title: Farmer, Landowner, Ag Investor, Crop Consultant
    Interests: Corn, Organic Row Crops, Peanuts, Rice, Sorghum, Wheat, Beef, Dairy, Feed, Poultry, Crop Scouting, Fertility, Irrigation, Soil Health

    Linda Wiesner Germany, Baden-Wi¼rttemberg Region, Stuttgart

    Job Title: Extension Agent or University Employee
    Interests: Swine

    Ioanna Smith Germany, Baden-Wi¼rttemberg Region, Aalen

    Interests: Canola

    Harmon Walter Germany, Bremen, Bremerhaven

    Interests: Organic Row Crops, Timber, Agribusiness

    Michael Reber Germany, Baden-Wi¼rttemberg Region, Schwi¤bisch Hall

    Interests: Corn, Soybeans, Wheat, Sorghum, Poultry, Swine, Cover Crops, Ag Policy, Organic Row Crops, Agribusiness, Triticale Ryegrass Clover

    Dmitrij Schwedöw Germany, Bavaria, Mitwitz

    Interests: Corn, Cotton, Rice, Beef, Dairy, Poultry, Swine, Ag Policy, Marketing, Agribusiness

    Eli Glazer Germany, Hesse, Bad Soden am Taunus

    Interests: Precision Agriculture, Irrigation, Agribusiness

    Gerardo Lopez Germany, Lower Saxony, Gottingen

    Interests: Precision Agriculture, Marketing, Smart Farming

  • No Groups Found
  • New chance for Nematicides Market

    By Darren Chan

    Published Apr 29, 2019 

    Market InterpretationNematicides helps in securing crops from nematodes as well as various other soil-dwelling pests. This, subsequently, has actually driven the growth of nematicides market. The burden on the healthcare sector because of the large-scale existence of chronic illness has actually urged changes in customer behavior pattern... Major research and development companyBASF SE (Germany), Monsanto Company (U... ), Bayer CropScience AG (Germany), E...

    Categories: Agribusiness, Corn, Wheat

    1 Comment

    Post As

    Viewable By

    My Followers
    • Everyone

      Every person viewing AgFuse.

    • My Followers

      Members who follow me.

    • Group Members

      Select a group I follow.

    Post As

  • Posted By Mark Smith
    Feb 7 

    #AgHistory
    A vast amount of agricultural history in the United States began outside of the United States. As you might expect, production agriculture for the Native Americans was very limited in scope and production(for many reasons). This being said, what is often overlooked in agricultural labor discussions here at home, is WHY men and women skilled in agriculture ventured to the New World in the first place, and why potential death and starvation looked more inviting to many than the situations left behind in their home countries. One book I highly recommend farm labor in general: Farm Labor in Germany, 1810-1945 by Dr. Frieda Wunderlich (1961). Dr. Wunderlich gives one example of a servant who was finally permitted to leave the farm and granted permission to migrate to Berlin. When asked to return to his previous lord of the land, he was then given permission to respond to his former “employer”: “...You and your sort are amazed that we run away. You gentlemen are responsible for it. We shall vote as the lord (landholder - where they migrated from) wants... read what the lord permits... keep our mouths shut about the suppression of the people... one has too much honor to allow one’s self to be treated like cattle.” It is important to understand that prior to the turn of the century in Germany, farm laborers were tied to the land and could never leave or change vocations without express permission of the ‘lord of the land’; neither could their children who were often born into this class. Even after migration to more urban dense areas in search of a better life, conditions were still identified as ‘miserable’ (but apparently better than where they came from). It is not hard to imagine industrious peoples choosing the unknown in the American, where they had control over their lives regardless of risk. From 1871 - 1900, 2.7 million Germans (predominantly rural “land folk”), emigrated to the United States. Dr. Wunderlich later identifies that ‘peasant’ children and farm workers were the most mobile of the rural population. An example of the life they chose (though from an earlier period) can be found in: History of Agriculture in the Northern United States, 1620-1860 first published 1925 and later updated in 1941. In one example, the months of May-July were particularly difficult resulting in near starvation, as no harvest had yet occurred. It would typically be corn planted by hand around trees or tree stumps (it could take 1 year to clear 1-3 acres). In one case, the nearest mill was 40 miles away and settlers would walk that on foot with a basket of corn on their backs. They may also use a samp mortar with a spring pole, and pound tolerable corn meal (one man per bushel/per day)... Our agriculture is founded in freedom over servitude. Samp mortars were stumps that had a bowl carved into them. A hardwood stump would be tied to a sapling and driven down into the bowl with corn, with the sapling aiding in raisin...

    Post main image

    7 Upvotes

    Post As

    Viewable By

    My Followers
    • Everyone

      Every person viewing AgFuse.

    • My Followers

      Members who follow me.

    • Group Members

      Select a group I follow.

    Post As

    Posted By Rutaksha Rawat
    Jan 24 

    https://www.pureecoindia.in/lyfesutra-introducing-indian-organic-foods-to-european-consumers-rutaksha-rawat/

    Post As

    Viewable By

    My Followers
    • Everyone

      Every person viewing AgFuse.

    • My Followers

      Members who follow me.

    • Group Members

      Select a group I follow.

    Post As

    Posted By Poultry Farming
    Nov 29, 2020 

    https://www.agriculture.com/markets/newswire/fast-spreading-bird-flu-puts-eu-poultry-industry-on-edge

    Post As

    Viewable By

    My Followers
    • Everyone

      Every person viewing AgFuse.

    • My Followers

      Members who follow me.

    • Group Members

      Select a group I follow.

    Post As

    Posted By Everything Hogs
    Sep 12, 2020 

    https://www.agriculture.com/markets/newswire/update-2-china-bans-german-pork-imports-after-african-swine-fever-case

    Post As

    Viewable By

    My Followers
    • Everyone

      Every person viewing AgFuse.

    • My Followers

      Members who follow me.

    • Group Members

      Select a group I follow.

    Post As

    http://ccstrade.com/thursday-morning-grain-comments-soybeans-corn-wheat-09-10-2020/
    1 Upvote

    Post As

    Viewable By

    My Followers
    • Everyone

      Every person viewing AgFuse.

    • My Followers

      Members who follow me.

    • Group Members

      Select a group I follow.

    Post As

    http://ccstrade.com/tuesdays-economic-commodity-futures-perspective-04-07-2020/ 
    1 Upvote

    Post As

    Viewable By

    My Followers
    • Everyone

      Every person viewing AgFuse.

    • My Followers

      Members who follow me.

    • Group Members

      Select a group I follow.

    Post As

    http://ccstrade.com/wednesday-morning-grain-comments-corn-soybeans-wheat-7/ 

    Post As

    Viewable By

    My Followers
    • Everyone

      Every person viewing AgFuse.

    • My Followers

      Members who follow me.

    • Group Members

      Select a group I follow.

    Post As

    Posted By Rutaksha Rawat
    Oct 24, 2019 

    https://www.pureecoindia.in/all-you-can-expect-at-biofach-germany-2020/
    Much more space, much more variety. And the legendary Dr Jane Goodall!

    Post As

    Viewable By

    My Followers
    • Everyone

      Every person viewing AgFuse.

    • My Followers

      Members who follow me.

    • Group Members

      Select a group I follow.

    Post As

    #Grain #Futures Comments

    -Germany's wheat crop expected to rebound sharply from last year
    -US seeking increased wheat exports to Brazil
    -Brazil seeking increased meat exports to China
    -US corn/spring wheat planting slow but it's still early...

    Germany’s association of farm cooperatives sees a nearly 21% increase in the country’s wheat production this year as it recovers from last year’s drought. A wheat crop of 24.4 MMT vs last year’s 20.3 MMT is currently expected. A sharp recovery in corn production is also anticipated to 4.3 MMT from last year’s 3.3 MMT. On the other side of the equation, though, German rapeseed production is expected to decline solidly following the massive 25% reduction in planted area last fall due to the ongoing drought conditions at the time of planting. Current ideas for this year’s German winter rapeseed crop, according to the association, are around 3.24 MMT vs last year’s 3.67 MMT as improved yields will help offset some of the acreage reduction.
    * A U.S. delegation of wheat industry officials (US Wheat Associates, Kansas Wheat Commission, among others) is in Brazil this week to gauge the potential for the U.S. to increase wheat exports to Brazil once they open the 750k tonne annual tariff-free import quota Brazilian president Bolsonaro announced during his White House visit in March. However, the quota will be open to other wheat exporting nations, as well. In recent years, the U.S. has exported as little at 121k tonnes of wheat to Brazil to as much as 1.5 MMT depending on their crop size. Record U.S. wheat exports to Brazil were 4.4 MMT in 2013/14 following Argentina’s back to back very poor wheat crops in 2012/13 and 2013/14 which sharply reduced their export availability.
    * Chinese and Brazilian officials are set to meet in...

    To continue, Visit

    1 Upvote

    Post As

    Viewable By

    My Followers
    • Everyone

      Every person viewing AgFuse.

    • My Followers

      Members who follow me.

    • Group Members

      Select a group I follow.

    Post As

    Call for applications: Global Innovation Challenge for Zero Hunger 2019

    The Global Innovation Challenge for Zero Hunger is looking for proposals that could transform the lives of smallholder farmers and small-scale livestock producers, reach a step change in food systems or increase the effectiveness of emergency response. From mobile applications to artificial intelligence, post-harvest loss prevention and new cultivation techniques, the challenge is seeking low- and high-tech solutions, business model innovations and more.

    Selected teams will participate in a joint bootcamp at the WFP Innovation Accelerator from 13 to 17 May 2019 in Munich, Germany, where they will tackle field-level challenges and refine project plans with the hands-on support of industry experts and partners including Cargill leaders. Teams will also get a chance to receive up to US$100,000 in equity-free funding and access to a global network to test the solution’s impact and scalability in the field.

    Dateline for submission: 28 February 2019

    Illustration Photo: Corn harvest in Purwoharjo, East Java, Indonesia (credits: Ikhlasul Amal / Flickr Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC 2.0))

    Check more

    Post main image

    Post As

    Viewable By

    My Followers
    • Everyone

      Every person viewing AgFuse.

    • My Followers

      Members who follow me.

    • Group Members

      Select a group I follow.

    Post As