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Search results for 'Germany'

  • Rainer Winter Germany, Hesse, Frankfurt am Main

    Business Title: DLG E.V.
    Job Title: Other Ag Professional, Communication Officer
    Interests: Ag Commentary, Marketing

    Nes Abdi Germany, Land Berlin, Berlin

    Business Title: Inland
    Job Title: Farmer, Landowner, Ag Investor, Crop Consultant
    Interests: Corn, Organic Row Crops, Peanuts, Rice, Sorghum, Wheat, Beef, Dairy, Feed, Poultry, Crop Scouting, Fertility, Irrigation, Soil Health

    Linda Wiesner Germany, Baden-Wi¼rttemberg Region, Stuttgart

    Job Title: Extension Agent or University Employee
    Interests: Swine

    Harmon Walter Germany, Bremen, Bremerhaven

    Interests: Organic Row Crops, Timber, Agribusiness

    Ioanna Smith Germany, Baden-Wi¼rttemberg Region, Aalen

    Interests: Canola

    Michael Reber Germany, Baden-Wi¼rttemberg Region, Schwi¤bisch Hall

    Interests: Corn, Soybeans, Wheat, Sorghum, Poultry, Swine, Cover Crops, Ag Policy, Organic Row Crops, Agribusiness, Triticale Ryegrass Clover

    Dmitrij Schwedöw Germany, Bavaria, Mitwitz

    Interests: Corn, Cotton, Rice, Beef, Dairy, Poultry, Swine, Ag Policy, Marketing, Agribusiness

    Gerardo Lopez Germany, Lower Saxony, Gottingen

    Interests: Precision Agriculture, Marketing, Smart Farming

    Eli Glazer Germany, Hesse, Bad Soden am Taunus

    Interests: Precision Agriculture, Irrigation, Agribusiness

  • Rainer Winter Germany, Hesse, Frankfurt am Main

    Business Title: DLG E.V.
    Job Title: Other Ag Professional, Communication Officer
    Interests: Ag Commentary, Marketing

    Nes Abdi Germany, Land Berlin, Berlin

    Business Title: Inland
    Job Title: Farmer, Landowner, Ag Investor, Crop Consultant
    Interests: Corn, Organic Row Crops, Peanuts, Rice, Sorghum, Wheat, Beef, Dairy, Feed, Poultry, Crop Scouting, Fertility, Irrigation, Soil Health

    Linda Wiesner Germany, Baden-Wi¼rttemberg Region, Stuttgart

    Job Title: Extension Agent or University Employee
    Interests: Swine

    Harmon Walter Germany, Bremen, Bremerhaven

    Interests: Organic Row Crops, Timber, Agribusiness

    Ioanna Smith Germany, Baden-Wi¼rttemberg Region, Aalen

    Interests: Canola

    Michael Reber Germany, Baden-Wi¼rttemberg Region, Schwi¤bisch Hall

    Interests: Corn, Soybeans, Wheat, Sorghum, Poultry, Swine, Cover Crops, Ag Policy, Organic Row Crops, Agribusiness, Triticale Ryegrass Clover

    Dmitrij Schwedöw Germany, Bavaria, Mitwitz

    Interests: Corn, Cotton, Rice, Beef, Dairy, Poultry, Swine, Ag Policy, Marketing, Agribusiness

    Gerardo Lopez Germany, Lower Saxony, Gottingen

    Interests: Precision Agriculture, Marketing, Smart Farming

    Eli Glazer Germany, Hesse, Bad Soden am Taunus

    Interests: Precision Agriculture, Irrigation, Agribusiness

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  • New chance for Nematicides Market

    By Darren Chan

    Published Apr 29, 2019 

    Market InterpretationNematicides helps in securing crops from nematodes as well as various other soil-dwelling pests. This, subsequently, has actually driven the growth of nematicides market. The burden on the healthcare sector because of the large-scale existence of chronic illness has actually urged changes in customer behavior pattern... Major research and development companyBASF SE (Germany), Monsanto Company (U... ), Bayer CropScience AG (Germany), E...

    Categories: Agribusiness, Corn, Wheat

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    How important is Air Speed when it comes to Effective Cooling?

    By KuhlerZ Core Body Cooling

    Published Oct 20 

    Dr. Sohail Basharat (Cow-comfort/Cow -Welfare Expert ) JLU University, Giessen Germany. Recently wrote an article outlining the finding of his extensive studies into the effects of air velocity and its ability to offer cooling to dairy cows. Key points from the article -An effective system needs to produce high-speed air. The higher the airspeed, the more cooling is provided...

    Categories: Beef, Dairy, Swine

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  • Posted By Rutaksha Rawat
    Oct 24, 2019 

    https://www.pureecoindia.in/all-you-can-expect-at-biofach-germany-2020/
    Much more space, much more variety. And the legendary Dr Jane Goodall!

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    Drones in Agriculture: Current and future legal status in Germany, the EU, the USA and Japan

    Authors: Matthias Reger, Josef Bauerdick, Heinz Bernhardt

    Journal Title: Landtechnik

    ISSN: 0023-8082 (Online)

    Publisher: Kuratorium für Technik und Bauwesen in der Landwirtschaft e. V.

    Agriculture promises diverse and attractive uses for drones. However, farmers and service providers are often unaware of the legal situation in their new traffic space - “air”. What restrictions arise from current law and thus possibly block usage scenarios? What developments are to be expected from a legal perspective and which opportunities/risks may emerge in the future? The legal regulations in Germany, the EU, the USA and Japan are considered. Starting from the status quo of agricultural drone use, international legislation will be compared and an outlook on the future role of drones in agriculture will be presented.

    Illustration Photo: Agricultural drone (CC0 Creative Commons from Pixabay.com)

    Check more https://adalidda.com/posts/37c5xwsy5mzPira2Z/drones-in-agriculture-current-and-future-legal-status-in
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    Posted By Kosona Chriv
    Oct 30, 2016 

    New Research found that the Sweet, Stevia Plant Molecules remain unchanged throughout the Stages of Processing

    A new research study conducted at the University of Bonn in Germany found that the sweet, stevia plant molecules remain unchanged throughout the stages of processing. The study supports stevia's naturality and found all nine of the steviol glycoside molecules required by the specifications set by the Joint Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA), a committee jointly administered by the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations and the World Health Organization (WHO), were present and unchanged in the dried stevia leaf, through the commercial extraction and purification process and in the final stevia leaf extract product.

    This research looked at three separate batches of stevia leaf that went through commercial production to final product, the 95 percent purity stevia leaf extract. The study samples were provided by PureCircle and each of the three, commercial batches included the dried stevia leaf, the first water extract and the final product from each of the three corresponding leaf samples. The research found that the stevia leaf extract end products were of 95 percent purity, which is required by JECFA. This is the first time a study has examined steviol glycosides from multiple commercial stevia leaf samples through different stages in the extraction and purification process, starting with the leaf and ending with the stevia sweetener end product.

    Photo: The stevia plant grows in a field in Kenya (credit: The Global Stevia Institute)
    https://adalidda.net/posts/ZhmtyK8s57ACsHTgM/new-research-found-that-the-sweet-stevia-plant-molecules
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    Posted By Mark Smith
    Feb 7 

    #AgHistory
    A vast amount of agricultural history in the United States began outside of the United States. As you might expect, production agriculture for the Native Americans was very limited in scope and production(for many reasons). This being said, what is often overlooked in agricultural labor discussions here at home, is WHY men and women skilled in agriculture ventured to the New World in the first place, and why potential death and starvation looked more inviting to many than the situations left behind in their home countries. One book I highly recommend farm labor in general: Farm Labor in Germany, 1810-1945 by Dr. Frieda Wunderlich (1961). Dr. Wunderlich gives one example of a servant who was finally permitted to leave the farm and granted permission to migrate to Berlin. When asked to return to his previous lord of the land, he was then given permission to respond to his former “employer”: “...You and your sort are amazed that we run away. You gentlemen are responsible for it. We shall vote as the lord (landholder - where they migrated from) wants... read what the lord permits... keep our mouths shut about the suppression of the people... one has too much honor to allow one’s self to be treated like cattle.” It is important to understand that prior to the turn of the century in Germany, farm laborers were tied to the land and could never leave or change vocations without express permission of the ‘lord of the land’; neither could their children who were often born into this class. Even after migration to more urban dense areas in search of a better life, conditions were still identified as ‘miserable’ (but apparently better than where they came from). It is not hard to imagine industrious peoples choosing the unknown in the American, where they had control over their lives regardless of risk. From 1871 - 1900, 2.7 million Germans (predominantly rural “land folk”), emigrated to the United States. Dr. Wunderlich later identifies that ‘peasant’ children and farm workers were the most mobile of the rural population. An example of the life they chose (though from an earlier period) can be found in: History of Agriculture in the Northern United States, 1620-1860 first published 1925 and later updated in 1941. In one example, the months of May-July were particularly difficult resulting in near starvation, as no harvest had yet occurred. It would typically be corn planted by hand around trees or tree stumps (it could take 1 year to clear 1-3 acres). In one case, the nearest mill was 40 miles away and settlers would walk that on foot with a basket of corn on their backs. They may also use a samp mortar with a spring pole, and pound tolerable corn meal (one man per bushel/per day)... Our agriculture is founded in freedom over servitude. Samp mortars were stumps that had a bowl carved into them. A hardwood stump would be tied to a sapling and driven down into the bowl with corn, with the sapling aiding in raisin...
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    #Grain #Futures Comments

    -Germany's wheat crop expected to rebound sharply from last year
    -US seeking increased wheat exports to Brazil
    -Brazil seeking increased meat exports to China
    -US corn/spring wheat planting slow but it's still early...

    Germany’s association of farm cooperatives sees a nearly 21% increase in the country’s wheat production this year as it recovers from last year’s drought. A wheat crop of 24.4 MMT vs last year’s 20.3 MMT is currently expected. A sharp recovery in corn production is also anticipated to 4.3 MMT from last year’s 3.3 MMT. On the other side of the equation, though, German rapeseed production is expected to decline solidly following the massive 25% reduction in planted area last fall due to the ongoing drought conditions at the time of planting. Current ideas for this year’s German winter rapeseed crop, according to the association, are around 3.24 MMT vs last year’s 3.67 MMT as improved yields will help offset some of the acreage reduction.
    * A U.S. delegation of wheat industry officials (US Wheat Associates, Kansas Wheat Commission, among others) is in Brazil this week to gauge the potential for the U.S. to increase wheat exports to Brazil once they open the 750k tonne annual tariff-free import quota Brazilian president Bolsonaro announced during his White House visit in March. However, the quota will be open to other wheat exporting nations, as well. In recent years, the U.S. has exported as little at 121k tonnes of wheat to Brazil to as much as 1.5 MMT depending on their crop size. Record U.S. wheat exports to Brazil were 4.4 MMT in 2013/14 following Argentina’s back to back very poor wheat crops in 2012/13 and 2013/14 which sharply reduced their export availability.
    * Chinese and Brazilian officials are set to meet in...

    To continue, Visit

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    Posted By Kimmy Farm
    Aug 15 

    Vietnam is a Southeast Asian country known for its beaches, rivers, Buddhist pagodas, and bustling cities. Hanoi and the Semi modern agriculture country in S.E Asia. In the Cashew nuts Industry, Vietnam is the largest producer and exporter of cashew kernels in the world. Over 65 percent of the world's export of cashew kernels is accounted for by Vietnam. Cashews nut from Vietnam are consumed in as many as 90 countries all over the world, the major markets being the United States, the United Kingdom, Japan, Netherlands, Australia, Canada, Germany Hong Kong, Singapore, New Zealand, and the Middle East countries.
    List of Top Cashew Growing Areas in Vietnam (cashew tree growing zone in Vietnam):
    - Binh Phuoc
    - Dong Nai
    - Song Be
    - Tay Ninh
    - Vung Tau
    - Binh Thuan
    - Ninh Thuan
    - Khanh Hoa
    - Binh Dinh
    - Quang Ngai
    - Gia Lai
    - Kon Tum
    - Daklak
    - Lam Dong

    #kimmyfarm #cashew #cashewnut

    https://kimmyfarm.com/en/where-are-the-cashew-nuts-grown-in-vietnam

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    Call for applications: Global Innovation Challenge for Zero Hunger 2019

    The Global Innovation Challenge for Zero Hunger is looking for proposals that could transform the lives of smallholder farmers and small-scale livestock producers, reach a step change in food systems or increase the effectiveness of emergency response. From mobile applications to artificial intelligence, post-harvest loss prevention and new cultivation techniques, the challenge is seeking low- and high-tech solutions, business model innovations and more.

    Selected teams will participate in a joint bootcamp at the WFP Innovation Accelerator from 13 to 17 May 2019 in Munich, Germany, where they will tackle field-level challenges and refine project plans with the hands-on support of industry experts and partners including Cargill leaders. Teams will also get a chance to receive up to US$100,000 in equity-free funding and access to a global network to test the solution’s impact and scalability in the field.

    Dateline for submission: 28 February 2019

    Illustration Photo: Corn harvest in Purwoharjo, East Java, Indonesia (credits: Ikhlasul Amal / Flickr Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC 2.0))

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    European call for proposals: Sustainable and Resilient agriculture for food and non-food systems

    Successful projects will address:
    • Developing markets for a wide range of products and services generated through integrated food and non-food systems e.g. via new bio-technologies and industrial processes, needs and opportunities of SMEs and intermediate sized businesses.
    • Resilient agricultural systems allowing growth and intensification of agriculture under the increasing stress of climate change, new pests and disease outbreaks and other environmental pressures and preserving biodiversity and ecosystem services.
    • Environmental sustainability indicators to assess other trade-offs between environmental and production deliverables for any particular agricultural system.
    • Spatial targeting of land use to increase biomass production and transformation, stimulating the growth of systems for the efficient utilisation of biomass cascading through novel transformations.
    • Sustainable intensification of integrated food and non-food systems of agriculture, by developing integrated, systems-based approaches to land management.

    Additional requirements to the projects:
    • Each research project proposal must include a plan for valorization of results and link with FACCE SURPLUS projects from the first and from the second call. Interconnections with other relevant initiatives in the thematic field are desirable.
    • Research projects should exploit the potential to produce relevant support for policy makers, e.g. policy briefs.
    • Cross-disciplinary projects encompassing biomass production and conversion thus promoting a comprehensive value chain concept will be given priority. Inclusion of private partners (e.g. SMEs), appropriate stakeholders and/or endusers (e.g. farmers) in the consortia is envisaged.
    • The integration of social sciences and humanities is encouraged to elaborate a broader economic, environmental and societal context.

    The 8 participating countries
    Germany,
    Belgium,
    Estonia,
    La France,
    Latvia,
    Lithuania,
    Poland,
    Romania.

    Submission deadline for the pre-proposal: 19 March 2019, 14:00 CET

    Illustration Photo: Riparian Forest Buffer (credits: USDA / Flickr Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0))

    Check more https://adalidda.com/posts/KtAPyn3YfCgPCoWg7/european-call-for-proposals-sustainable-and-resilient
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    Pocket-size food scanner

    According to a study by the environmental organization WWF Germany, ten million metric tons of food are thrown in the garbage every year in Germany despite still being edible. A mobile food scanner will allow consumers and supermarket operators in the future to test whether food items have gone bad. The pocket-size device uses infrared measurements to determine the ripeness and shelf life of produce and display the results via an app. Fraunhofer researchers developed the system, which exists in demonstrator form, together with partners in a project commissioned by the Bavarian Ministry of Food, Agriculture and Forestry.

    Photo: Many food items wind up in the garbage even though they are still edible. A compact food scanner will help avoid unnecessary food waste in the future. © Fraunhofer IOSB

    Check more https://adalidda.com/posts/kYALJtd7Gmm8w9oPP/pocket-size-food-scanner
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    A Review of Commercial Biogas Systems and Lessons for Africa

    Authors: Francis Kemausuor, Muyiwa S. Adaramola and John Morken

    Journal: Energies 2018, 11(11), 2984

    Publisher: MDPI

    Many African countries have vast biomass resources that could serve as feedstock for methane production through the adoption of commercial biogas plants. However, due to many inhibiting factors, these resources are under-utilised. This article reviews commercial biogas systems that treat organic waste from municipalities, large livestock farms, large plantations/crop farms, food/beverage production facilities, and other industries, to identify essential lessons which African countries could use to develop/disseminate such biogas systems. The review identified the critical barriers to commercial biogas development to be high initial capital costs, weak environmental policies, poor institutional framework, poor infrastructure and a general lack of willpower to implement renewable energy policies and set challenging targets. In African countries where feed-in-tariffs, quota obligations and competitive bidding programmes have been instituted, implementation has been poor, and most state-owned utilities have been unsupportive. Using knowledge from more experienced countries such as Germany and China, some key lessons have were identified. Among the key lessons is the need to institute and enforce environmental management policies to ensure that waste from medium and large livestock farms and industries are not disposed of indiscriminately, a tool China has recently used to promote commercial biogas plants to a high degree of success.

    Illustration Photo: Lethbridge Biogas Facility (credits: Tonyglen14 / Flickr Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0))

    Check more https://adalidda.com/posts/gsTX7NdSYchLiJsWs/a-review-of-commercial-biogas-systems-and-lessons-for-africa
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