Advertisement

19 Results

Search results for 'Grapes/ Vineyards'

  • Best way to control powdery mildew on grape plant

    By Darren Chan

    Published 11 months ago

    If you grow grapes,you may reaching to see a white powdery substance on the grape leaves. It’s the grape powdery mildew. Especally in main grapevine growing area such as Americas,Europe and Australia. The disease seems as a whitish-gray powdery coating on the leaves or fruit caused by plant mycelium and conidia on the surface of the plant... His analysis triggered an organic gardener and vintner who try the milk mixture on his vineyards...

    Categories: Agribusiness, Canola, Organic

    3 Most Troubling Grapevine Diseases

    By Darren Chan

    Published 9 months ago

    There are more than 30 known grape diseases. Among them, sour rot, anthrax and powdery mildew are the most common diseases. If we know more about grape diseases, we can improve grape growing environment, promote grape yield and improve economic benefits. Grape Sour RotSour rot is usually caused by the mixture of acetic acid bacteria, yeasts, fungi, Drosophila larvae and other microorganisms... In hot and rainy years, it is easy to spread in vineyards...

    Categories: Agribusiness, Organic, Timber Production

    Best way to control powdery mildew on grape plant 1

    By Darren Chan

    Published 11 months ago

    If you grow grapes,you may reaching to see a white powdery substance on the grape leaves. It’s the grape powdery mildew. Especally in main grapevine growing area such as Americas,Europe and Australia. The disease seems as a whitish-gray powdery coating on the leaves or fruit caused by plant mycelium and conidia on the surface of the plant... His analysis triggered an organic gardener and vintner who try the milk mixture on his vineyards...

    Categories: Agribusiness, Canola, Organic

    Go Unmanned

    Public
    Go Unmanned sells drones, drone training, and drone services across the East Coast. Drones already have been used in Precision Agriculture, forestry,horticulture,greenhouses, vineyards,and livestock.
    Interest: Corn, Cotton, Peanuts, Soybeans, Wheat, Rice, Canola, Grain Sorghum, Beef Cattle, Dairy, Poultry, Hogs, Specialty, Cover Crops, Precision Ag, Organic, Irrigation, Timber Production, Marketing, Agribusiness

  • Go Unmanned

    Public
    Go Unmanned sells drones, drone training, and drone services across the East Coast. Drones already have been used in Precision Agriculture, forestry,horticulture,greenhouses, vineyards,and livestock.
    Interest: Corn, Cotton, Peanuts, Soybeans, Wheat, Rice, Canola, Grain Sorghum, Beef Cattle, Dairy, Poultry, Hogs, Specialty, Cover Crops, Precision Ag, Organic, Irrigation, Timber Production, Marketing, Agribusiness

  • Best way to control powdery mildew on grape plant

    By Darren Chan

    Published 11 months ago

    If you grow grapes,you may reaching to see a white powdery substance on the grape leaves. It’s the grape powdery mildew. Especally in main grapevine growing area such as Americas,Europe and Australia. The disease seems as a whitish-gray powdery coating on the leaves or fruit caused by plant mycelium and conidia on the surface of the plant... His analysis triggered an organic gardener and vintner who try the milk mixture on his vineyards...

    Categories: Agribusiness, Canola, Organic

    3 Most Troubling Grapevine Diseases

    By Darren Chan

    Published 9 months ago

    There are more than 30 known grape diseases. Among them, sour rot, anthrax and powdery mildew are the most common diseases. If we know more about grape diseases, we can improve grape growing environment, promote grape yield and improve economic benefits. Grape Sour RotSour rot is usually caused by the mixture of acetic acid bacteria, yeasts, fungi, Drosophila larvae and other microorganisms... In hot and rainy years, it is easy to spread in vineyards...

    Categories: Agribusiness, Organic, Timber Production

    Best way to control powdery mildew on grape plant 1

    By Darren Chan

    Published 11 months ago

    If you grow grapes,you may reaching to see a white powdery substance on the grape leaves. It’s the grape powdery mildew. Especally in main grapevine growing area such as Americas,Europe and Australia. The disease seems as a whitish-gray powdery coating on the leaves or fruit caused by plant mycelium and conidia on the surface of the plant... His analysis triggered an organic gardener and vintner who try the milk mixture on his vineyards...

    Categories: Agribusiness, Canola, Organic

  • Use of multispectral and thermal imagery in precision viticulture

    Authors: G Tanda and V. Chiarabini

    Published under licence by IOP Publishing Ltd
    Journal of Physics: Conference Series, Volume 1224, conference 1

    The increasing demand for higher quality and yield of wine production has led to a growing interest in precision viticulture, i.e., practices of monitoring and managing spatial variations in variables related to productivity within a vineyard. This paper presents a few applications of optical measurements, in combination with monitoring systems making use of geolocation and remote/proximal sensing, to calculate vegetation indices related to plant vigour and water stress in vineyards. Measurements were performed on vineyards in Burgenland, Austria, by both aerial and proximal (terrestrial) sensing techniques. A remote-sensing, four-band multispectral sensor, placed on an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV), has been used to detect the spectral signature of the vineyard and to calculate the NDVI index, useful to selectively address the harvest on the basis of quality and quantity of grapes. Proximal, thermal infrared imaging complemented the investigation providing information about the water status of the vegetation through the CWSI index. Examples of vigour maps are provided, showing, inside a given parcel, the presence of canopies at different level of vegetation characteristics. Results provide a range of information useful to make the optimal choice in management strategies of vineyards.

    Photo: UAV equipped with multispectral sensor, GPS device and digital camera. (credits: G Tanda and V. Chiarabini)

    Check more https://adalidda.com/posts/RCvbdQDZK7mjyn6H8/use-of-multispectral-and-thermal-imagery-in-precision
    Agronomic Evaluation of Biochar, Compost and Biochar-Blended Compost across Different Cropping Systems: Perspective from the European Project FERTIPLUS

    Authors: Miguel A. Sánchez-Monedero, María L. Cayuela, María Sánchez-García, Bart Vandecasteele, Tommy D’Hose, Guadalupe López, Carolina Martínez-Gaitán, Peter J. Kuikman, Tania Sinicco and Claudio Mondini

    Journal Title: Agronomy

    ISSN: 2073-4395 (Online)

    Publisher: MDPI AG

    This paper reports the results on the agronomic performance of organic amendments in the EU 7th FP project “FERTIPLUS—reducing mineral fertilizers and agro-chemicals by recycling treated organic waste as compost and bio-char”. Four case studies on field-scale application of biochar, compost and biochar-blended compost were established and studied for three consecutive years in four distinct cropping systems and under different agro-climatic conditions in Europe. These included the following sites: olive groves in Murcia (Spain), greenhouse grown tomatoes in Almeria (Spain), an arable crop rotation in Oost-Vlaanderen (Merelbeke, Belgium), and three vineyards in Friuli Venezia Giulia (Italy). A slow pyrolysis oak biochar was applied, either alone or in combination with organic residues: compost from olive wastes in Murcia (Spain), sheep manure in Almeria (Spain), and compost from biowaste and green waste in Belgium and Italy. The agronomical benefits were evaluated based on different aspects of soil fertility (soil total organic carbon (TOC), pH, nutrient cycling and microbial activity) and crop nutritional status and productivity. All amendments were effective in increasing soil organic C in all the field trials. On average, the increase with respect to the control was about 11% for compost, 20% for biochar-blended compost, and 36% for biochar. The amendments also raised the pH by 0.15–0.50 units in acidic soils. Only biochar had a negligible fertilization effect. On the contrary, compost and biochar-blended compost were effective in enhancing soil fertility by increasing nutrient cycling (25% mean increase in extractable organic C and 44% increase in extractable N), element availability (26% increase in available K), and soil microbial activity (26% increase in soil respiration and 2–4 fold enhancement of denitrifying activity). In general, the tested amendments did not show any negative effect on crop yield and quality. Furthermore, in vineyards and greenhouse grown tomatoes cropping systems, compost and biochar-blended compost were also effective in enhancing key crop quality parameters (9% increase in grape must acidity and 16% increase in weight, 9% increase in diameter and 8% increase in hardness of tomato fruits) important for the quality and marketability of the crops. The overall results of the project suggest that the application of a mixture of biochar and compost can benefit crops. Therefore, biochar-blended compost can support and maintain soil ferti...

    Posted By Technology
    5 months ago

    https://www.precisionag.com/market-watch/how-robots-are-taking-over-vineyards/

    VineRobot, an Unmanned ground vehicle equipped with non-invasive sensor technology to monitor grape growth

    The VineRobot is equipped with non-invasive advanced sensors and artificial intelligence systems, to provide reliable, fast and objective information on the state of the vineyards to grape growers. Thanks to these technologies, VineRobot will be able to work — that is, retrieving agronomical and physiological data from the grapevines — autonomously and safely over long periods of time under the uncertain environmental conditions typically found in vineyards.

    The first version of the VineRobot incorporates a fluorescence-based sensor to assess nitrogen content in leaves. The measurement is performed on-the-go and provides information about the heterogeneity and state of the vineyard.
    The other sensor included in the VineRobot measures the anthocyanin content in grapes. This sensor is a fusion between a fluorescence sensor and a fine vision system: It gathers information about the composition of grape berries.

    Photo: VineRobot (crédits: VineRobot Project http://www.vinerobot.eu)

    Check more https://adalidda.com/posts/uo6xZhtWngJD3KrMx/vinerobot-an-unmanned-ground-vehicle-equipped-with-non
    A Comprehensive IoT Node Proposal Using Open Hardware. A Smart Farming Use Case to Monitor Vineyards

    Authors: Sergio Trilles, Alberto González-Pérez and Joaquín Huerta

    Journal: Electronics 2018, 7(12), 419

    Publisher: MDPI

    The last decade has witnessed a significant reduction in prices and an increased performance of electronic components, coupled with the influence of the shift towards the generation of open resources, both in terms of knowledge (open access), programs (open-source software), and components (open hardware). This situation has produced different effects in today’s society, among which is the empowerment of citizens, called makers, who are themselves able to generate citizen science or build assembly developments. Situated in the context described above, the current study follows a Do-It-Yourself (DIY) approach. In this way, it attempts to define a conceptual design of an Internet of Things (IoT) node, which is reproducible at both physical and behavioral levels, to build IoT nodes which can cover any scenario. To test this conceptual design, this study proposes a sensorization node to monitor meteorological phenomena. The node is called SEnviro (node) and features different improvements such as: the possibility of remote updates using Over-the-Air (OTA) updates; autonomy, using 3G connectivity, a solar panel, and applied energy strategies to prolong its life; and replicability, because it is made up of open hardware and other elements such as 3D-printed pieces. The node is validated in the field of smart agriculture, with the aim of monitoring different meteorological phenomena, which will be used as input to disease detection models to detect possible diseases within vineyards.

    Illustration Photo: Vineyard (CC0 Creative Commons from Pixabay.com)

    Check more https://adalidda.com/posts/k96ZRSrdQMDF8pRuk/a-comprehensive-iot-node-proposal-using-open-hardware-a

    Posted By Technology
    1 years, 2 months ago

    https://www.growingproduce.com/fruits/grapes/make-vineyard-management-precise/

    Posted By Ag Sustainability And Innovation
    1 years, 3 months ago

    GeoFIS: An Open Source, Decision-Support Tool for Precision Agriculture Data

    Authors: Corentin Leroux, Hazaël Jones, Léo Pichon, Serge Guillaume, Julien Lamour, James Taylor, Olivier Naud, Thomas Crestey, Jean-Luc Lablee and Bruno Tisseyre

    Journal: Agriculture 2018, 8(6), 73;



    Publisher: MDPI

    The world we live in is an increasingly spatial and temporal data-rich environment, and agriculture is no exception. However, data needs to be processed in order to first get information and then make informed management decisions. The concepts of ‘Precision Agriculture’ and ‘Smart Agriculture’ are and will be fully effective when methods and tools are available to practitioners to support this transformation. An open-source software called GeoFIS has been designed with this objective. It was designed to cover the whole process from spatial data to spatial information and decision support. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the abilities of GeoFIS along with its embedded algorithms to address the main features required by farmers, advisors, or spatial analysts when dealing with precision agriculture data. Three case studies are investigated in the paper: (i) mapping of the spatial variability in the data, (ii) evaluation and cross-comparison of the opportunity for site-specific management in multiple fields, and (iii) delineation of within-field zones for variable-rate applications when these latter are considered opportune. These case studies were applied to three contrasting crop types, banana, wheat and vineyards. These were chosen to highlight the diversity of applications and data characteristics that might be handled with GeoFIS. For each case-study, up-to-date algorithms arising from research studies and implemented in GeoFIS were used to process these precision agriculture data. Areas for future development and possible relations with existing geographic information systems (GIS) software is also discussed.

    Photo: Aggregated risk zones of sub-optimal management practices derived using the NDVI, ECa, and elevation layers together with local expert knowledge. (credits: Corentin Leroux, Hazaël Jones, Léo Pichon, Serge Guillaume, Julien Lamour, James Taylor, Olivier Naud, Thomas Crestey, Jean-Luc Lablee and Bruno Tisseyre )


    Check more

    Posted By Ag Sustainability And Innovation
    1 years, 5 months ago

    New high-tech drones target Australian vineyards to help stop pests and diseases

    Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) equipped with machine learning and hyperspectral cameras could become a new weapon for the grape industry, as it fights a major battle with a tiny pest.

    The high-tech drones have proved successful in detecting grape phylloxera (Daktulospaira vitifoliae) in a research trial between QUT, Agriculture Victoria and the Plant Biosecurity CRC (PBCRC).

    Photo: One of the high-tech drones at work in a vineyard (credit: QUT)

    Check more

    Posted By Ag Sustainability And Innovation
    1 years, 5 months ago

    3-D Characterization of Vineyards Using a Novel UAV Imagery-Based OBIA Procedure for Precision Viticulture Applications

    Authors: Ana I. de Castro, Francisco M. Jiménez-Brenes, Jorge Torres-Sánchez, José M. Peña, Irene Borra-Serrano and Francisca López-Granados

    Journal: Remote Sensing 2018, 10(4), 584; doi:10.3390/rs10040584

    Publisher: MDPI

    Precision viticulture has arisen in recent years as a new approach in grape production. It is based on assessing field spatial variability and implementing site-specific management strategies, which can require georeferenced information of the three dimensional (3D) grapevine canopy structure as one of the input data. The 3D structure of vineyard fields can be generated applying photogrammetric techniques to aerial images collected with Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), although processing the large amount of crop data embedded in 3D models is currently a bottleneck of this technology. To solve this limitation, a novel and robust object-based image analysis (OBIA) procedure based on Digital Surface Model (DSM) was developed for 3D grapevine characterization. The significance of this work relies on the developed OBIA algorithm which is fully automatic and self-adaptive to different crop-field conditions, classifying grapevines, and row gap (missing vine plants), and computing vine dimensions without any user intervention. The results obtained in three testing fields on two different dates showed high accuracy in the classification of grapevine area and row gaps, as well as minor errors in the estimates of grapevine height. In addition, this algorithm computed the position, projected area, and volume of every grapevine in the field, which increases the potential of this UAV- and OBIA-based technology as a tool for site-specific crop management applications.

    Photo: Image of the studied fields at different growth stages: (b) the UAV flying over Field B (credits: Ana I. de Castro, Francisco M. Jiménez-Brenes, Jorge Torres-Sánchez, José M. Peña, Irene Borra-Serrano and Francisca López-Granados)

    Check more

    Posted By Ag Sustainability And Innovation
    2 years, 8 months ago

    A Novel Methodology for Improving Plant Pest Surveillance in Vineyards and Crops Using UAV-Based Hyperspectral and Spatial Data

    Authors: Fernando Vanegas, Dmitry Bratanov, Kevin Powell, John Weiss and Felipe Gonzalez

    Journal Title: Sensors

    ISSN: 1424-8220 (Print)

    Publisher: MDPI AG

    Recent advances in remote sensed imagery and geospatial image processing using unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) have enabled the rapid and ongoing development of monitoring tools for crop management and the detection/surveillance of insect pests. This paper describes a (UAV) remote sensing-based methodology to increase the efficiency of existing surveillance practices (human inspectors and insect traps) for detecting pest infestations (e.g., grape phylloxera in vineyards). 

    Photo: Headwall Nano hyperspectral sensor on-board a S800 unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) (credits: Fernando Vanegas, Dmitry Bratanov, Kevin Powell, John Weiss and Felipe Gonzalez)

    Check more