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159 Results

Search results for 'Grass'

  • Nevil Amiss United Kingdom, England, Helston

    Interests: Wheat, Beef Cattle, Cover Crops, Precision Ag, Agribusiness, Grass, Arable Silage, Sheep

    Michael Reber Germany, Baden-Wi¼rttemberg Region, Schwi¤bisch Hall

    Interests: Corn, Soybeans, Wheat, Grain Sorghum, Poultry, Hogs, Cover Crops, Ag Issues in Washington, Organic, Agribusiness, Triticale Ryegrass Clover

    Peg Cook United States, NY, Lowville

    Business Title: Retired
    About: I am a retired Agronomist of about 50 years that still has a passion for soils. Love to help Farmers and Farms of all sizes usecommon sense principles concerning soil questions and soil tests. I owned my own business, Cooks Consulting, for 33 yrs. before retiring due to major health issues, (heart failure and diabetes and more). I also ran my own soil test lab for 20 yrs. before having to close
    Interests: Corn, Specialty/Vegetable, Dairy, Cover Crops, Organic, Agribusiness, Alfalfa, Grasses

    Todd Flodman United States, NE, Eagle

    Interests: Grass Golf Coruse

    Jeff Schwarz United States, TX, Greenville

    Business Title: 380 Ranch
    Job Title: Manager
    About: Married, 5 children, 12 grandchildren. Current: Equine Ranch Manager. horse boarding and related activities. Also I am a Real Estate and Business Financing Agent. Former manufacturer, distributor, consultant agricultural specialty products for crop and livestock production. Customer and Agent for Limbic Arc.
    Interests: Beef Cattle, Specialty, Cover Crops, Organic, Agribusiness, Grasses Heys, Horses

    Rose Karsemeijer Netherlands, Provincie Utrecht, Nieuwer-Ter-Aa

    Interests: Dairy, Precision Ag, Marketing, Agribusiness, Grass

    Terry Siegfried United States, SD, Newell

    Business Title: Bear Butte Boers
    About: Retired military. Raising goats, chickens, ducks, turkeys, maybe a pig or three, and other edible animals and vegetation, too. We also have horses in case we run out of things to do.
    Interests: Poultry, Cover Crops, Irrigation, Grass, Meat Goat

  • Nevil Amiss United Kingdom, England, Helston

    Interests: Wheat, Beef Cattle, Cover Crops, Precision Ag, Agribusiness, Grass, Arable Silage, Sheep

    Michael Reber Germany, Baden-Wi¼rttemberg Region, Schwi¤bisch Hall

    Interests: Corn, Soybeans, Wheat, Grain Sorghum, Poultry, Hogs, Cover Crops, Ag Issues in Washington, Organic, Agribusiness, Triticale Ryegrass Clover

    Peg Cook United States, NY, Lowville

    Business Title: Retired
    About: I am a retired Agronomist of about 50 years that still has a passion for soils. Love to help Farmers and Farms of all sizes usecommon sense principles concerning soil questions and soil tests. I owned my own business, Cooks Consulting, for 33 yrs. before retiring due to major health issues, (heart failure and diabetes and more). I also ran my own soil test lab for 20 yrs. before having to close
    Interests: Corn, Specialty/Vegetable, Dairy, Cover Crops, Organic, Agribusiness, Alfalfa, Grasses

    Todd Flodman United States, NE, Eagle

    Interests: Grass Golf Coruse

    Jeff Schwarz United States, TX, Greenville

    Business Title: 380 Ranch
    Job Title: Manager
    About: Married, 5 children, 12 grandchildren. Current: Equine Ranch Manager. horse boarding and related activities. Also I am a Real Estate and Business Financing Agent. Former manufacturer, distributor, consultant agricultural specialty products for crop and livestock production. Customer and Agent for Limbic Arc.
    Interests: Beef Cattle, Specialty, Cover Crops, Organic, Agribusiness, Grasses Heys, Horses

    Rose Karsemeijer Netherlands, Provincie Utrecht, Nieuwer-Ter-Aa

    Interests: Dairy, Precision Ag, Marketing, Agribusiness, Grass

    Terry Siegfried United States, SD, Newell

    Business Title: Bear Butte Boers
    About: Retired military. Raising goats, chickens, ducks, turkeys, maybe a pig or three, and other edible animals and vegetation, too. We also have horses in case we run out of things to do.
    Interests: Poultry, Cover Crops, Irrigation, Grass, Meat Goat

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  • A New Era of Farm Employees: Farm Technicians vs. Farm Hands?

    By Gregory Heilers

    Published 1 years, 4 months ago

    Traditional agricultural skills that made civilization possible are still alive and in use today. At the same time, hundreds of farm technician job listings across the US, and the rise of precision agriculture and software, clearly evidence the need for technologically-savvy farm technicians in the 21st century agricultural industry. It’s no surprise that tech-friendly millennials interested in farming are encouraged by these developments, which may make farming less labor intensive than in generations past... Compost still grows grass; chickens still like fly larvae. ”Compost is the same, but practices have changed on some farmsJoel’s advice for someone looking to educate themselves on ecological farming ranged from reading The Stockman Grass Farmer and ACRES USA to “spending time walking and thinking on your farm...

    What Farmers Need to Know About Mycorrhizae

    By Laura Barrera

    Published 11 months ago

    If someone asked you, “How do plants take up the water and nutrients they need?” you’d probably tell them through the roots. But did you know that for many crops, those roots aren’t working alone?That’s because most plant species associate with mycorrhizal fungi. What is mycorrhizal fungi? University of Alberta biological scientist JC Cahill says that mycorrhizas are actually the interaction between a fungus and a plant. Although there are many different types of mycorrhizae, the only one crop farmers need to be concerned about is arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), as 65% of plant species associate with it... Grasses like sorghums, millets, rye, triticale, barleys — and oats in particular — are also excellent colonizers...

    Categories: Cover Crops

    4 Steps to Building Soil Organic Matter in the South

    By Laura Barrera

    Published 1 years, 2 months ago

    As we learn more about what goes on in the world beneath our feet, increased attention has been placed on soil organic matter... In addition to organic matter increasing, Kloot discovered that nutrient levels and pH on the five farmers’ soils were quite stable — remaining practically unchanged, despite being in full production and not having any commercial fertilizer applied, except for nitrogen to grass crops, which Kloot says was typically applied at lower rates... Kloot says that while species like grass crops tend to bring more carbon into the soil because they have more biomass, continuously growing grasses without any additional diversity will cause productivity in the soil to go down... He knows one farmer who decided to grow a mix of sorghum sudangrass, sunn hemp, daikon radish, sunflower and cowpeas right after his corn crop, before planting winter wheat... ”Kloot recommends including warm- and cool-season grasses, broadleaves and legumes in your rotation...

    Categories: Cover Crops

    Why Hemp Isn’t Going to Save the US Farmer (But How It Could)

    By The Crossover

    Published 1 month ago

    In late 2018, a new farm bill was passed that legalized the production of hemp as an agricultural commodity while also removing it from the list of “controlled substances”. The Gold Rush of the modern farming era was on... In the mid-2000s, peanuts and switchgrass were new crops introduced to South Carolina (peanuts used to operate under a government quota/allotment program). Peanuts were able to tap into an existing infrastructure and supply chain, while switchgrass was not... I haven’t seen switchgrass grown in years...

    Categories: Agribusiness, Marketing, Specialty/Vegetable

    Million Dollar Dirt

    By Amanda Allworth

    Published 1 years, 2 months ago

    Dirt. It’s arguably a farmer’s most valuable natural resource. But what makes some soils more productive than others? That’s a complicated question to answer, but we do know that the healthiest soils share some common characteristics. While some of these are difficult to change, there are management practices you can employ to improve soil quality... Adding grass, barley, legumes or wheat to your rotation can increase carbon availability in soil...

    Application of Chitosan oligosaccharide in agriculture

    By Darren Chan

    Published 12 months ago

    Chitosan oligosaccharide is a low-molecular-weight product obtained by degradation of chitosan by lactate which has outstanding water-solubility and high biological activity, thus it can be easily absorbed and utilized by crops. Chitosan oligosaccharide is new green solution to control plant diseases,What’s advantages of Dora Chitosan oligosaccharide1. Increase seed germinationIt has the good effect on seed germination,after we applying on rye grass seed,its germination index increased 33. 5% and vitality index increased 59. 5%...

    Categories: Specialty/Vegetable

    7 Ways to Measure Soil Health Improvements

    By Laura Barrera

    Published 6 months ago

    While there are numerous reasons for using cover crops, a primary one is improving soil health. In fact, it’s the one benefit most farmers using cover crops have experienced: In the most recent Cover Crop Survey Annual Report, of those who rated the statement, “Using cover crops has improved soil health on my farm,” 86% agreed or strongly agreed. The report notes that it’s interesting and heartening that “soil health reflects an embrace of a long-term, hard-to-quantify benefit of cover crops, and that for the past two surveys, it has achieved the top spot by garnering 86% of the responses... The NRCS says this can be from a grassland, fencerow, or no-tilled field, if you’re not no-tilling... The dark area of this northern Minnesota soil is from carbon sequestration, due to being in permanent grass cover...

    Categories: Cover Crops

    Grasses like cereal rye are a good species for beginning cover crop users as they grow fast and have fibrous roots. Photo by Stephen Ausmus, USDA Agricultural Research Service.

    Early Cover Crop Benefits: What Can You Expect in the First Year?

    By Laura Barrera

    Published 1 years, 4 months ago

    In 1995, Pennsylvania farmer Steve Groff was speaking at an event when he asked the audience the question: Do cover crops pay off?His thinking at the time was that he had been no-tilling since 1982, and maybe if he no-tilled long enough, he wouldn’t need them. Ray Weil, a soil ecologist with the University of Maryland, happened to hear his question and approached Groff about doing a cover crop study on his farm. It turned into a 12-year project, from 1995 to 2007... Best cover crops to begin withFor farmers who are hoping for benefits from the get-go, Kladivko says grasses like cereal rye, wheat or barley, are good ones to start with because they grow faster and have fibrous roots... In that situation, a grass is a better option...

    Categories: Cover Crops

    Can You Use Legume Cover Crops in Your Peanut Rotation?

    By Laura Barrera

    Published 1 years, 3 weeks ago

    Avoid Legumes Before Peanuts; Use Grasses InsteadBalkcom believes the rule of avoiding legumes before peanuts also applies to legume cover crops, and points out that the typical intended purpose of growing a legume cover, doesn’t make sense for growing in front a peanut crop anyway... So it really makes no sense to buy a legume cover crop that’s going to be more expensive than, say, your traditional grass cover crops... ”Instead, Balkcom recommends farmers use grasses before peanuts, particularly cereal rye... ”He adds that oats and triticale are also good grass options. In addition to some of the common benefits — such as erosion control, soil moisture retention and weed suppression — from using a grass species, some studies have shown they can also provide specific benefits to peanuts...

    Categories: Cover Crops, Peanuts

    Should You Rotate Your Cover Crops? 4 Issues to Consider

    By Laura Barrera

    Published 1 years, 3 months ago

    This can be an issue for cereal grain farmers using annual ryegrass as a cover crop, where having a few escapes is not unheard of. “If we have a few escapes of annual ryegrass and a few years later we’re planting wheat in that field, we’re not really thinking annual ryegrass is a problem because we go in and spray everything out,” Robison says. “And the next year we plant wheat and we don’t spray any grass killer, then we possibly end up with annual ryegrass in the wheat or malting barley or some other high-value crop. ”Photo from University of Georgia Ag Extension shows both wheat and ryegrass seedlings emerging in the same field. The ryegrass was found around edges and obstructions in the field...

    Categories: Cover Crops

  • Posted By Robert Morgan
    1 years, 3 months ago

    https://agfuse.com/article/the-rise-of-the-organic-farm-market-

    Posted By Gregory Heilers
    1 years, 4 months ago

    The legendary Joel Salatin weighed in on this article with advice on how to find the perfect intern! https://agfuse.com/article/how-to-source-farm-interns

    Posted By Farmers Under Forty
    2 years, 6 months ago

    https://agfuse.com/article/the-100-000-decision-you-039-re-about-to-make

    Posted By Cover Crops
    1 years, 4 months ago

    https://agfuse.com/article/early-cover-crop-benefits-what-can-you-expect-in-the-first-year-

    Posted By Andere Lutforovich
    11 months ago

    https://agfuse.com/article/how-to-feed-your-goats-and-care-in-this-winter

    Posted By Laura Barrera
    1 years, 4 months ago

    https://agfuse.com/article/early-cover-crop-benefits-what-can-you-expect-in-the-first-year-

    Posted By Robert Malmstrom
    5 months ago

    https://www.westtexaslivestockgrowers.com/keep-an-eye-out-for-grass-tetany/#more-500

    Posted By Ailena Gastineau
    9 months ago

    https://www.facebook.com/groups/Soil4Climate/permalink/2283616221910119/

    Posted By Vegetable Production
    1 years, 3 weeks ago

    https://www.growingproduce.com/vegetables/get-grasp-grasshoppers-protect-crops/

    Posted By Farmers Under Forty
    6 months ago

    https://hoards.com/article-25154-words-of-wisdom-for-aspiring-farmers.html