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Search results for 'Grasses Heys'

  • Jeff Schwarz United States, TX, Greenville

    Business Title: 380 Ranch
    Job Title: Manager
    About: Married, 5 children, 12 grandchildren. Current: Equine Ranch Manager. horse boarding and related activities. Also I am a Real Estate and Business Financing Agent. Former manufacturer, distributor, consultant agricultural specialty products for crop and livestock production. Customer and Agent for Limbic Arc.
    Interests: Beef Cattle, Specialty, Cover Crops, Organic, Agribusiness, Grasses Heys, Horses

    Peg Cook United States, NY, Lowville

    Business Title: Retired
    About: I am a retired Agronomist of about 50 years that still has a passion for soils. Love to help Farmers and Farms of all sizes usecommon sense principles concerning soil questions and soil tests. I owned my own business, Cooks Consulting, for 33 yrs. before retiring due to major health issues, (heart failure and diabetes and more). I also ran my own soil test lab for 20 yrs. before having to close
    Interests: Corn, Specialty/Vegetable, Dairy, Cover Crops, Organic, Agribusiness, Alfalfa, Grasses

    Don Stickle United States, IA, Anamosa

    Interests: Corn, Canola, Beef Cattle, Cover Crops, Ag Issues in Washington, Grasses

    Grasses like cereal rye are a good species for beginning cover crop users as they grow fast and have fibrous roots. Photo by Stephen Ausmus, USDA Agricultural Research Service.

    Early Cover Crop Benefits: What Can You Expect in the First Year?

    By Laura Barrera

    Published 1 years, 2 weeks ago

    In 1995, Pennsylvania farmer Steve Groff was speaking at an event when he asked the audience the question: Do cover crops pay off?His thinking at the time was that he had been no-tilling since 1982, and maybe if he no-tilled long enough, he wouldn’t need them. Ray Weil, a soil ecologist with the University of Maryland, happened to hear his question and approached Groff about doing a cover crop study on his farm. It turned into a 12-year project, from 1995 to 2007. It was in 1999, four years into it, Groff got the answer to his question... Best cover crops to begin withFor farmers who are hoping for benefits from the get-go, Kladivko says grasses like cereal rye, wheat or barley, are good ones to start with because they grow faster and have fibrous roots...

    Categories: Cover Crops

    4 Steps to Building Soil Organic Matter in the South

    By Laura Barrera

    Published 10 months ago

    As we learn more about what goes on in the world beneath our feet, increased attention has been placed on soil organic matter. And for good reason. While it only makes up a small percentage of most soils, the Sustainable Agriculture Research & Education (SARE) says it’s the “very foundation for healthy and productive soils” — and the more organic matter there is, the better the results... Kloot says that while species like grass crops tend to bring more carbon into the soil because they have more biomass, continuously growing grasses without any additional diversity will cause productivity in the soil to go down... ”Kloot recommends including warm- and cool-season grasses, broadleaves and legumes in your rotation...

    What Farmers Need to Know About Mycorrhizae

    By Laura Barrera

    Published 7 months ago

    If someone asked you, “How do plants take up the water and nutrients they need?” you’d probably tell them through the roots. But did you know that for many crops, those roots aren’t working alone?That’s because most plant species associate with mycorrhizal fungi. What is mycorrhizal fungi? University of Alberta biological scientist JC Cahill says that mycorrhizas are actually the interaction between a fungus and a plant. Although there are many different types of mycorrhizae, the only one crop farmers need to be concerned about is arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), as 65% of plant species associate with it... Grasses like sorghums, millets, rye, triticale, barleys — and oats in particular — are also excellent colonizers...

    Categories: Cover Crops

    Can You Use Legume Cover Crops in Your Peanut Rotation?

    By Laura Barrera

    Published 9 months ago

    It’s common knowledge among peanut farmers that the farther out you space your peanut crops in your rotation, the better off the peanuts will be... Avoid Legumes Before Peanuts; Use Grasses InsteadBalkcom believes the rule of avoiding legumes before peanuts also applies to legume cover crops, and points out that the typical intended purpose of growing a legume cover, doesn’t make sense for growing in front a peanut crop anyway... ”Instead, Balkcom recommends farmers use grasses before peanuts, particularly cereal rye... The seven cover crops were:Common vetch (legume)Hairy vetch (legume)White clover (legume)Red clover (legume)Triticale (grass)Wheat (grass)Rye (grass)While there were no significant differences between the two years in the uninfested field, on the infested field, grasses significantly reduced nematode populations and had significantly higher yields than the legume cover crops. While the clovers followed the grasses in reducing nematode populations, the researchers point out they also had a negative impact on peanut yields...

    Categories: Cover Crops, Peanuts

    Nutrient Stratification Not a Problem in No-Till

    By Laura Barrera

    Published 9 months ago

    A common concern growers may have when they move to a no-till system is nutrient stratification. Without tillage to mix fertilizer into the soil, no-tillers may wonder whether the nutrients applied to the soil surface are reaching the crop roots. According to University of Nebraska Extension engineer Paul Jasa and Ray Ward, plant scientist and founder of Ward Laboratories in Kearney, Neb. , the resounding answer is: yes, they are... While the calcium-magnesium in corn stalks will help slow it, broadleaf covers contain a lot more calcium-magnesium than grasses, which can help slow it even more...

  • Jeff Schwarz United States, TX, Greenville

    Business Title: 380 Ranch
    Job Title: Manager
    About: Married, 5 children, 12 grandchildren. Current: Equine Ranch Manager. horse boarding and related activities. Also I am a Real Estate and Business Financing Agent. Former manufacturer, distributor, consultant agricultural specialty products for crop and livestock production. Customer and Agent for Limbic Arc.
    Interests: Beef Cattle, Specialty, Cover Crops, Organic, Agribusiness, Grasses Heys, Horses

    Peg Cook United States, NY, Lowville

    Business Title: Retired
    About: I am a retired Agronomist of about 50 years that still has a passion for soils. Love to help Farmers and Farms of all sizes usecommon sense principles concerning soil questions and soil tests. I owned my own business, Cooks Consulting, for 33 yrs. before retiring due to major health issues, (heart failure and diabetes and more). I also ran my own soil test lab for 20 yrs. before having to close
    Interests: Corn, Specialty/Vegetable, Dairy, Cover Crops, Organic, Agribusiness, Alfalfa, Grasses

    Don Stickle United States, IA, Anamosa

    Interests: Corn, Canola, Beef Cattle, Cover Crops, Ag Issues in Washington, Grasses

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  • Grasses like cereal rye are a good species for beginning cover crop users as they grow fast and have fibrous roots. Photo by Stephen Ausmus, USDA Agricultural Research Service.

    Early Cover Crop Benefits: What Can You Expect in the First Year?

    By Laura Barrera

    Published 1 years, 2 weeks ago

    In 1995, Pennsylvania farmer Steve Groff was speaking at an event when he asked the audience the question: Do cover crops pay off?His thinking at the time was that he had been no-tilling since 1982, and maybe if he no-tilled long enough, he wouldn’t need them. Ray Weil, a soil ecologist with the University of Maryland, happened to hear his question and approached Groff about doing a cover crop study on his farm. It turned into a 12-year project, from 1995 to 2007. It was in 1999, four years into it, Groff got the answer to his question... Best cover crops to begin withFor farmers who are hoping for benefits from the get-go, Kladivko says grasses like cereal rye, wheat or barley, are good ones to start with because they grow faster and have fibrous roots...

    Categories: Cover Crops

    4 Steps to Building Soil Organic Matter in the South

    By Laura Barrera

    Published 10 months ago

    As we learn more about what goes on in the world beneath our feet, increased attention has been placed on soil organic matter. And for good reason. While it only makes up a small percentage of most soils, the Sustainable Agriculture Research & Education (SARE) says it’s the “very foundation for healthy and productive soils” — and the more organic matter there is, the better the results... Kloot says that while species like grass crops tend to bring more carbon into the soil because they have more biomass, continuously growing grasses without any additional diversity will cause productivity in the soil to go down... ”Kloot recommends including warm- and cool-season grasses, broadleaves and legumes in your rotation...

    What Farmers Need to Know About Mycorrhizae

    By Laura Barrera

    Published 7 months ago

    If someone asked you, “How do plants take up the water and nutrients they need?” you’d probably tell them through the roots. But did you know that for many crops, those roots aren’t working alone?That’s because most plant species associate with mycorrhizal fungi. What is mycorrhizal fungi? University of Alberta biological scientist JC Cahill says that mycorrhizas are actually the interaction between a fungus and a plant. Although there are many different types of mycorrhizae, the only one crop farmers need to be concerned about is arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), as 65% of plant species associate with it... Grasses like sorghums, millets, rye, triticale, barleys — and oats in particular — are also excellent colonizers...

    Categories: Cover Crops

    Can You Use Legume Cover Crops in Your Peanut Rotation?

    By Laura Barrera

    Published 9 months ago

    It’s common knowledge among peanut farmers that the farther out you space your peanut crops in your rotation, the better off the peanuts will be... Avoid Legumes Before Peanuts; Use Grasses InsteadBalkcom believes the rule of avoiding legumes before peanuts also applies to legume cover crops, and points out that the typical intended purpose of growing a legume cover, doesn’t make sense for growing in front a peanut crop anyway... ”Instead, Balkcom recommends farmers use grasses before peanuts, particularly cereal rye... The seven cover crops were:Common vetch (legume)Hairy vetch (legume)White clover (legume)Red clover (legume)Triticale (grass)Wheat (grass)Rye (grass)While there were no significant differences between the two years in the uninfested field, on the infested field, grasses significantly reduced nematode populations and had significantly higher yields than the legume cover crops. While the clovers followed the grasses in reducing nematode populations, the researchers point out they also had a negative impact on peanut yields...

    Categories: Cover Crops, Peanuts

    Nutrient Stratification Not a Problem in No-Till

    By Laura Barrera

    Published 9 months ago

    A common concern growers may have when they move to a no-till system is nutrient stratification. Without tillage to mix fertilizer into the soil, no-tillers may wonder whether the nutrients applied to the soil surface are reaching the crop roots. According to University of Nebraska Extension engineer Paul Jasa and Ray Ward, plant scientist and founder of Ward Laboratories in Kearney, Neb. , the resounding answer is: yes, they are... While the calcium-magnesium in corn stalks will help slow it, broadleaf covers contain a lot more calcium-magnesium than grasses, which can help slow it even more...

    Damages of nematodes on turf

    By Darren Chan

    Published 4 weeks ago

    In recent years, many growers around the world have recognized an increase in the incidence of turfgrass damage caused by nematodes attacks. The nematode is one of the most plentiful and oldest animals on earth. Although most nematodes are feed on microorganisms or organisms, and many are plant or animal parasites. Plant parasitic nematodes are 0... Roots of turfgrasses exhibit brown-black lesions of various sizes and shapes...

    Categories: Agribusiness, Dairy, Wheat

  • Posted By Cover Crops
    1 years, 2 weeks ago

    https://agfuse.com/article/early-cover-crop-benefits-what-can-you-expect-in-the-first-year-

    Posted By Laura Barrera
    1 years, 2 weeks ago

    https://agfuse.com/article/early-cover-crop-benefits-what-can-you-expect-in-the-first-year-

    Posted By Debby Cochran
    10 months ago

    At present we are hand harvesting and cleaning pasture grasses for weaving Bee Skeps. We’re suppling our grasses to a teacher of Skep Weaving in Camas WA.
    This crop is most gratifying to work with. We use to simply brush hog it into the ground. I’ve alwas loved how beatiful and stately these tall grasses stood in our pasture. Now they are honored by being woven into fine housing for honey bees.

    Posted By Mi Shetkari
    3 months ago

    Three cover crop categories exist: Grasses like cereal rye and Sudan grass; brassicas like turnips, radishes, and rapeseed; and legumes like hairy vetch and clover.

    Posted By Cover Crops
    2 months ago

    https://www.agriculture.com/crops/cover-crops/what-cover-crops-should-you-plant

    Posted By Wheat Producers
    4 months ago

    https://www.no-tillfarmer.com/articles/8496-using-computer-model-data-to-predict-wheat-forage-success

    Posted By Wheat Producers
    5 months ago

    https://agfax.com/2018/12/17/texas-wheat-new-computer-model-helps-predict-forage-success/

    Posted By Sorghum Producers
    7 months ago

    https://www.no-tillfarmer.com/articles/8247-controlling-annual-weeds-ahead-of-corn-sorghum-with-fall-applied-herbicides

    Posted By Ag Sustainability And Innovation
    1 years, 3 weeks ago

    Call for Applications: The Africa Biosciences Challenge Fund (ABCF) Fellowship

    The purpose of the ABCF fellowship program is to develop capacity for agricultural biosciences research in Africa, to support research for development projects that ultimately contribute towards increasing food and nutritional security and/or food safety in Africa, and to facilitate access to the BecA-ILRI Hub facilities by African researchers (and their partners). We seek applicants with innovative ideas for short to medium term research projects (up to 12 months) aligned with national, regional or continental agricultural development priorities that can be undertaken at the BecA-ILRI Hub.

    Areas of research

    Applicants must be scientists affiliated (through employment) with African National Agricultural Research Systems (NARS) e.g. national agricultural research institutes and universities, and conducting research in the areas of food and nutritional security or food safety in Africa. Those carrying out research in the following areas are particularly encouraged to apply*;

    Improved control of priority livestock and fish diseases including: African Swine Fever (ASF); Contagious Bovine Pleuropneumonia (CBPP) and Contagious Caprine Pleuropneumonia (CCPP); Peste des Petits Ruminants (PPR); Rift Valley Fever (RVF); East Coast Fever (ECF); Capripox Virus diseases of ruminants;
    Harnessing genetic diversity for conservation, resistance to disease and improving productivity of crops and livestock and fish (livestock focus: African indigenous breeds, particularly goats, chickens, alternative small livestock species);
    Molecular breeding for important food security crops in Africa;
    Plant transformation to address food insecurity in Africa;
    Plant-microbe interactions;
    Tissue culture and virus indexing for production of virus-free planting materials in Africa;
    Orphan/underutilized species of crops and livestock;
    Crop pests, pathogens and weed management research, including biological control;
    Microbial technology for improving adaptation of staple food crops and forages to biotic and abiotic stresses;
    Rapid diagnostics for crop, livestock and fish diseases;
    Genomics, bioinformatics and metagenomics including microbial discovery;
    Studies on climate-smart forage grasses and mixed livestock-crop systems;
    Microbial technology for improving adaptation of staple food crops and forages to biotic and abiotic stresses;
    Soil health in agricultural systems;
    Improved control of parasitic pathogens of plants (bacteria, fungi, oomycetes) that cause enormous economic losses as well as environmental damage in natural ecosystems (e.g.: Phytophthora infestans that causes potato blight).

    Dateline for submission: 30th June 2018

    Illustration Photo: Scientists work in a laboratory at the International Livestock Research Institute in Nairobi, Kenya. (credits: Kate Holt / Africa Practice / ...

    Posted By Cattle Group
    1 years, 5 months ago

    https://soilsmatter.wordpress.com/2018/01/01/what-are-the-benefits-of-growing-multiple-types-of-forage-grasses-for-grazing-animals/