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47 Results

Search results for 'Irish Potato'

  • Irish Housden United States, WA, Mount Vernon

    Interests: Cover Crops

    What Farmers Need to Know About Mycorrhizae

    By Laura Barrera

    Published 1 years, 3 weeks ago

    If someone asked you, “How do plants take up the water and nutrients they need?” you’d probably tell them through the roots. But did you know that for many crops, those roots aren’t working alone?That’s because most plant species associate with mycorrhizal fungi. What is mycorrhizal fungi? University of Alberta biological scientist JC Cahill says that mycorrhizas are actually the interaction between a fungus and a plant. Although there are many different types of mycorrhizae, the only one crop farmers need to be concerned about is arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), as 65% of plant species associate with it... AMF can also help plants resist and overcome pathogen infections, as the authors note that it’s well-documented that mycorrhizal associations protect tomato plants from Phytophthora parasitica and potato plants from Fusarium sambucinum...

    Categories: Cover Crops

    Beauveria Bassiana Products Bed Bugs Control

    By Darren Chan

    Published 1 month ago

    Beauveria Bassiana fungus is a fungus that grows naturally in soils around the world. Acting as a parasite on various arthropod species, causing white muscardine disease; It widely used as a sprayed biological insecticide to control a great many pests such as bed bugs, termites, thrips, whiteflies, aphids, and different beetles. Once Beauveria Bassiana infects the host insects, the fungus grows fast inside of the insect’s body... Main Features(1) Wide SpectrumBeauveria Bassiana can parasitize more than 700 species of insects and mites of 15 orders and 149 families, such as Lepidoptera, Hymenoptera, Homoptera, with wings mesh and Orthoptera, such as adult, corn borer, moth, soybean sorghum budworm, weevil, potato beetle, small tea green leafhoppers, rice shell pest rice planthopper and rice leafhopper,, mole, grubs, wireworm, cutworms, garlic, leek, maggot maggots variety of underground and ground, etc ... It is currently used in the production of wheat, corn, peanuts, soybeans, potatoes, sweet potatoes, green Chinese onions, garlic, leeks, eggplant, peppers, tomatoes, watermelons, cucumbers, etc...

    Categories: Corn, Organic, Peanuts

    Early Blight & Late Blight | How to distinguish

    By Darren Chan

    Published 2 months ago

    Early blight and late blight are the most common diseases on tomato & potato. They usually take huge losses to farmers. Although the names of the two diseases are the only one-word difference, some growers do not know exactly about the difference between early blight and late blight. First, we need to how to recognize their symptoms. Difference between Early blight & Late blightCausesEarly blight is caused by two different closely related fungi, Alternaria tomatophila, and Alternaria solani, which lives in soil and plant debris...

    Categories: Irrigation, Organic, Wheat

  • Irish Housden United States, WA, Mount Vernon

    Interests: Cover Crops

  • No Groups Found
  • What Farmers Need to Know About Mycorrhizae

    By Laura Barrera

    Published 1 years, 3 weeks ago

    If someone asked you, “How do plants take up the water and nutrients they need?” you’d probably tell them through the roots. But did you know that for many crops, those roots aren’t working alone?That’s because most plant species associate with mycorrhizal fungi. What is mycorrhizal fungi? University of Alberta biological scientist JC Cahill says that mycorrhizas are actually the interaction between a fungus and a plant. Although there are many different types of mycorrhizae, the only one crop farmers need to be concerned about is arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), as 65% of plant species associate with it... AMF can also help plants resist and overcome pathogen infections, as the authors note that it’s well-documented that mycorrhizal associations protect tomato plants from Phytophthora parasitica and potato plants from Fusarium sambucinum...

    Categories: Cover Crops

    Beauveria Bassiana Products Bed Bugs Control

    By Darren Chan

    Published 1 month ago

    Beauveria Bassiana fungus is a fungus that grows naturally in soils around the world. Acting as a parasite on various arthropod species, causing white muscardine disease; It widely used as a sprayed biological insecticide to control a great many pests such as bed bugs, termites, thrips, whiteflies, aphids, and different beetles. Once Beauveria Bassiana infects the host insects, the fungus grows fast inside of the insect’s body... Main Features(1) Wide SpectrumBeauveria Bassiana can parasitize more than 700 species of insects and mites of 15 orders and 149 families, such as Lepidoptera, Hymenoptera, Homoptera, with wings mesh and Orthoptera, such as adult, corn borer, moth, soybean sorghum budworm, weevil, potato beetle, small tea green leafhoppers, rice shell pest rice planthopper and rice leafhopper,, mole, grubs, wireworm, cutworms, garlic, leek, maggot maggots variety of underground and ground, etc ... It is currently used in the production of wheat, corn, peanuts, soybeans, potatoes, sweet potatoes, green Chinese onions, garlic, leeks, eggplant, peppers, tomatoes, watermelons, cucumbers, etc...

    Categories: Corn, Organic, Peanuts

    Early Blight & Late Blight | How to distinguish

    By Darren Chan

    Published 2 months ago

    Early blight and late blight are the most common diseases on tomato & potato. They usually take huge losses to farmers. Although the names of the two diseases are the only one-word difference, some growers do not know exactly about the difference between early blight and late blight. First, we need to how to recognize their symptoms. Difference between Early blight & Late blightCausesEarly blight is caused by two different closely related fungi, Alternaria tomatophila, and Alternaria solani, which lives in soil and plant debris...

    Categories: Irrigation, Organic, Wheat

  • Posted By Vegetable Production
    2 years, 7 months ago

    https://agfuse.com/article/profit-per-ways-to-think-about-measure-and-factors-that-impact-fruit-and-vegetable-profits

    Posted By Monica Pape
    1 years, 2 months ago

    1. Harvest what you can, if at all possible
    2. Clear field of all debris, especially any affected plant material including weeds
    3. Send a sample to a pathology lab to confirm whether bacterial or fungal. I’m leaning toward fungal, anthracnosis, however, a positive identification is better than my gut feeling. With a positive id, you can then decide what, if any bactericide or fungicide would be most effective or even cost effective at this point. You won't necessarily see a pest that might be potentially causing problems. Sometimes going out at night with a flashlight you are able to catch them in the act.
    4. If you haven’t had a soil test done, do it now and see where the pH is. Sometimes a pH adjustment can go a long way in complementing cultural practices and treatments that need to be done as well. It has been shown that liming can inhibit spore development. You still need to know the pH to determine a source, rate, and if it is even an option. If you're sending a soil test out include pH, OM, CEC, macros, micros, and if possible base saturation. Might as well get it all at one time.
    5. You may need to rotate out of potatoes and cabbage. Maybe for several years. Or invest in treated seed or field transplants that have been fumigated.
    6. I’d also suggest cover cropping with something like oats or rye. Oats have been shown to sequester toxins in animals. I don’t have any scientific proof of their remedial capabilities in soils. I really wish I did though. Normally I would suggest mustard. However, I’m not sure what the efficacy would be in this case. It’s just a consideration at this point. I still think your best bet is pH, looking at drainage issues, rotating, and using disease-resistant/treated varieties.
    7. Usually, bacterial/fungal issues are exacerbated by wetter than normal seasons and poor drainage. If drainage is an ongoing issue you may need to look at taking steps to alleviate it such as tiling or amending. Map/note where drainage issues are and affected plants are
    8. There is a lot of good info. at Cornell's website about bactericides/fungicides regarding efficacy, rates, etc.
    9. My gut could be wrong a lab diagnosis is more definitive than my gut and catch-all terms.
    10. If you have more questions, don't hesitate to email me at theaccidentalagronomist@gmail.com. I respond quicker to emails.

    Posted By Vegetable Production
    1 years, 4 months ago

    https://www.growingproduce.com/vegetables/helpful-tips-scouting-potato-fields-insect-pests/

    Posted By Ag Sustainability And Innovation
    2 years, 3 months ago

    Processing, Valorization and Application of Bio-Waste Derived Compounds from Potato, Tomato, Olive and Cereals: A Review

    Authors: Caroline Fritsch, Andreas Staebler, Anton Happel, Miguel Angel Cubero Márquez, Ingrid Aguiló-Aguayo, Maribel Abadias, Miriam Gallur, Ilaria Maria Cigognini, Angela Montanari, Maria Jose López, Francisca Suárez-Estrella, Nigel Brunton, Elisa Luengo, Laura Sisti, Maura Ferri and Gianluca Belotti

    Journal Title: Sustainability

    ISSN: 2071-1050 (Online)

    Publisher: MDPI AG

    The vast and ever-growing amount of agricultural and food wastes has become a major concern throughout the whole world. Therefore, strategies for their processing and value-added reuse are needed to enable a sustainable utilization of feedstocks and reduce the environmental burden. By-products of potato, tomato, cereals and olive arise in significant amounts in European countries and are consequently of high relevance. Due to their composition with various beneficial ingredients, the waste products can be valorized by different techniques leading to economic and environmental advantages. This paper focuses on the waste generation during industrial processing of potato, tomato, cereals and olives within the European Union and reviews state-of-the-art technologies for their valorization. Furthermore, current applications, future perspectives and challenges are discussed.

    Illustration Photo: Olive tree (Public Domain from Pixabay.com)

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    Posted By Vegetable Production
    2 weeks ago

    https://www.farmprogress.com/vegetables/cultural-practices-vital-battling-sweet-potato-fungal-diseases

    Posted By Rutaksha Rawat
    3 months ago

    In the late 60s, Dr Croucher, an economist and volunteer with the American Peace Corps, visited Uttarakhand and fell in love with the state and its people. In 1994—along with Sharmila Ribeiro, Girish Bahuguna and SP Singh—he founded AT India, which went on to establish the FPO Devbhumi. Today, Devbhumi boasts 8,500 producers as shareholders. READ THE STORY HERE:
    https://www.pureecoindia.in/american-etches-farmer-success-story-in-land-of-gods/
    Crop Monitoring Using Sentinel-1 Data: A Case Study from The Netherlands

    Authors: Saeed Khabbazan, Paul Vermunt, Susan Steele-Dunne, Lexy Ratering Arntz, Caterina Marinetti, Dirk van der Valk, Lorenzo Iannini, Ramses Molijn, Kees Westerdijk and Corné van der Sande

    Journal Title: Remote Sensing

    ISSN: 2072-4292 (Print)

    Publisher: MDPI AG

    Agriculture is of huge economic significance in The Netherlands where the provision of real-time, reliable information on crop development is essential to support the transition towards precision agriculture. Optical imagery can provide invaluable insights into crop growth and development but is severely hampered by cloud cover. This case study in the Flevopolder illustrates the potential value of Sentinel-1 for monitoring five key crops in The Netherlands, namely sugar beet, potato, maize, wheat and English rye grass. Time series of radar backscatter from the European Space Agency’s Sentinel-1 Mission are analyzed and compared to ground measurements including phenological stage and height. Temporal variations in backscatter data reflect changes in water content and structure associated with phenological development. Emergence and closure dates are estimated from the backscatter time series and validated against a photo archive. Coherence data are compared to Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and ground data, illustrating that the sudden increase in coherence is a useful indicator of harvest. The results presented here demonstrate that Sentinel-1 data have significant potential value to monitor growth and development of key Dutch crops. Furthermore, the guaranteed availability of Sentinel-1 imagery in clouded conditions ensures the reliability of data to meet the monitoring needs of farmers, food producers and regulatory bodies.

    Figure : Location of study area and map of crop types in Flevopolder. (credits: Saeed Khabbazan, Paul Vermunt, Susan Steele-Dunne, Lexy Ratering Arntz, Caterina Marinetti, Dirk van der Valk, Lorenzo Iannini, Ramses Molijn, Kees Westerdijk and Corné van der Sande)

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    Potato Yield Prediction Using Machine Learning Techniques and Sentinel 2 Data

    Authors: Diego Gómez, Pablo Salvador, Julia Sanz and Jose Luis Casanova

    Journal: Remote Sensing 2019

    Publisher: MDPI

    Traditional potato growth models evidence certain limitations, such as the cost of obtaining the input data required to run the models, the lack of spatial information in some instances, or the actual quality of input data. In order to address these issues, we develop a model to predict potato yield using satellite remote sensing. In an effort to offer a good predictive model that improves the state of the art on potato precision agriculture, we use images from the twin Sentinel 2 satellites (European Space Agency—Copernicus Programme) over three growing seasons, applying different machine learning models. First, we fitted nine machine learning algorithms with various pre-processing scenarios using variables from July, August and September based on the red, red-edge and infra-red bands of the spectrum. Second, we selected the best performing models and evaluated them against independent test data. Finally, we repeated the previous two steps using only variables corresponding to July and August. Our results showed that the feature selection step proved vital during data pre-processing in order to reduce multicollinearity among predictors. The Regression Quantile Lasso model (11.67% Root Mean Square Error, RMSE; R2 = 0.88 and 9.18% Mean Absolute Error, MAE) and Leap Backwards model (10.94% RMSE, R2 = 0.89 and 8.95% MAE) performed better when predictors with a correlation coefficient > 0.5 were removed from the dataset. In contrast, the Support Vector Machine Radial (svmRadial) performed better with no feature selection method (11.7% RMSE, R2 = 0.93 and 8.64% MAE). In addition, we used a random forest model to predict potato yields in Castilla y León (Spain) 1–2 months prior to harvest, and obtained satisfactory results (11.16% RMSE, R2 = 0.89 and 8.71% MAE). These results demonstrate the suitability of our models to predict potato yields in the region studied.

    Figure: Maps of predicted potato yield for svmRadial_3 under scenario D across the study period: (A,B) 2016, (C,D) 2017, (E,F) 2018 (credits: Diego Gómez, Pablo Salvador, Julia Sanz and Jose Luis Casanova)

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    Posted By Farmers Under Forty
    5 months ago

    https://www.farmprogress.com/crops/find-potato-leafhoppers-your-alfalfa-these-5-tips
    Monitoring Potato Waste in Food Manufacturing Using Image Processing and Internet of Things Approach

    Authors: Sandeep Jagtap, Chintan Bhatt, Jaydeep Thik and Shahin Rahimifard

    Journal Title: Sustainability

    ISSN: 2071-1050 (Online)

    Publisher: MDPI AG

    Approximately one-third of the food produced globally is spoiled or wasted in the food supply chain (FSC). Essentially, it is lost before it even reaches the end consumer. Conventional methods of food waste tracking relying on paper-based logs to collect and analyse the data are costly, laborious, and time-consuming. Hence, an automated and real-time system based on the Internet of Things (IoT) concepts is proposed to measure the overall amount of waste as well as the reasons for waste generation in real-time within the potato processing industry, by using modern image processing and load cell technologies. The images captured through a specially positioned camera are processed to identify the damaged, unusable potatoes, and a digital load cell is used to measure their weight. Subsequently, a deep learning architecture, specifically the Convolutional Neural Network (CNN), is utilised to determine a potential reason for the potato waste generation. An accuracy of 99.79% was achieved using a small set of samples during the training test. We were successful enough to achieve a training accuracy of 94.06%, a validation accuracy of 85%, and a test accuracy of 83.3% after parameter tuning. This still represents a significant improvement over manual monitoring and extraction of waste within a potato processing line. In addition, the real-time data generated by this system help actors in the production, transportation, and processing of potatoes to determine various causes of waste generation and aid in the implementation of corrective actions

    Figure: Architecture of Real-time potato waste tracking system (credits: Sandeep Jagtap, Chintan Bhatt, Jaydeep Thik and Shahin Rahimifard)

    Check more https://adalidda.com/posts/HYK8XKzS92LRuJoPA/monitoring-potato-waste-in-food-manufacturing-using-image