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64 Results

Search results for 'Irish Potato'

  • Irish Housden United States, WA, Mount Vernon

    Interests: Cover Crops

    Michelle Grainger United States, NC, Benson

    Business Title: NC SweetPotato Commission
    Interests:

    Oh deer! Deer damage and what farmers can do about it

    By John Moody

    Published May 21, 2018  

    It is that time of year again, at least in my parts... For certain vegetable crops - sweet potatoes, certain greens and the like - deer damage can be catastrophic. A pack of deer can graze down a tenth of an acre of sweet potatoes in just a night or two (Don’t ask me how I know…)... We put in rows of sweet potatoes whose sole purpose was to act as a sacrifice patch for any deer that made it over the fencing... Any sweet potatoes that do make it will then become food for our pigs, who will be rotated through the patch in the fall...

    What Farmers Need to Know About Mycorrhizae

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Nov 2, 2018  

    If someone asked you, “How do plants take up the water and nutrients they need?” you’d probably tell them through the roots. But did you know that for many crops, those roots aren’t working alone?That’s because most plant species associate with mycorrhizal fungi. What is mycorrhizal fungi? University of Alberta biological scientist JC Cahill says that mycorrhizas are actually the interaction between a fungus and a plant. Although there are many different types of mycorrhizae, the only one crop farmers need to be concerned about is arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), as 65% of plant species associate with it... AMF can also help plants resist and overcome pathogen infections, as the authors note that it’s well-documented that mycorrhizal associations protect tomato plants from Phytophthora parasitica and potato plants from Fusarium sambucinum...

    Categories: Cover Crops

    Early Blight & Late Blight | How to distinguish

    By Darren Chan

    Published Sep 17, 2019  

    Early blight and late blight are the most common diseases on tomato & potato. They usually take huge losses to farmers. Although the names of the two diseases are the only one-word difference, some growers do not know exactly about the difference between early blight and late blight. First, we need to how to recognize their symptoms. Difference between Early blight & Late blightCausesEarly blight is caused by two different closely related fungi, Alternaria tomatophila, and Alternaria solani, which lives in soil and plant debris...

    Categories: Irrigation, Organic, Wheat

    Insecticide Beauveria Bassiana Bed Bug Treatment

    By Darren Chan

    Published Mar 13  

    Have you used bio insecticide beauveria bassiana for bed bugs treatment? Beauveria bassiana is a parasite that grows in the soil around the world. It is used as a biopesticide to control many pests, particularly bed bugs, bugs, thrips, whiteflies, aphids, and distinct beetles. Beauveria bassiana is a non-toxic, odorless, and environmentally friendly product. It's constant infectivity to pests... Insecticide Beauveria Bassiana Control targetIt may control tadpoles, locusts, potato beetles, aphids, leafhoppers, planthoppers, an assortment of lepidopteran larvae like corn borer/pine caterpillar/peach heartworm / diploid borer...

    Categories: Agribusiness, Marketing, Organic

    Beauveria Bassiana Products Bed Bugs Control

    By Darren Chan

    Published Oct 15, 2019  

    Beauveria Bassiana fungus is a fungus that grows naturally in soils around the world. Acting as a parasite on various arthropod species, causing white muscardine disease; It widely used as a sprayed biological insecticide to control a great many pests such as bed bugs, termites, thrips, whiteflies, aphids, and different beetles. Once Beauveria Bassiana infects the host insects, the fungus grows fast inside of the insect’s body... Main Features(1) Wide SpectrumBeauveria Bassiana can parasitize more than 700 species of insects and mites of 15 orders and 149 families, such as Lepidoptera, Hymenoptera, Homoptera, with wings mesh and Orthoptera, such as adult, corn borer, moth, soybean sorghum budworm, weevil, potato beetle, small tea green leafhoppers, rice shell pest rice planthopper and rice leafhopper,, mole, grubs, wireworm, cutworms, garlic, leek, maggot maggots variety of underground and ground, etc ... It is currently used in the production of wheat, corn, peanuts, soybeans, potatoes, sweet potatoes, green Chinese onions, garlic, leeks, eggplant, peppers, tomatoes, watermelons, cucumbers, etc...

    Categories: Corn, Organic, Peanuts

    Welcome to Some Small Farm

    By John Moody

    Published Apr 3, 2018  

    Few of my family and friends would have ever expected me to become a farmer. I was that city kid, happy to play video games, hide from the sun, and grow my collection of Lego's and other toys far more than any interest in growing things like food. Life takes you surprising places, though, and 20 years later I found myself on 30+ acres of land, farming my family of seven and enjoying a country life that I never expected to find. I grew up in a blue collar (pipeline construction) family in northeast Ohio... Early potatoes will give way to peppers, tomatoes, or cucumbers...

  • Irish Housden United States, WA, Mount Vernon

    Interests: Cover Crops

    Michelle Grainger United States, NC, Benson

    Business Title: NC SweetPotato Commission
    Interests:

  • No Groups Found
  • Oh deer! Deer damage and what farmers can do about it

    By John Moody

    Published May 21, 2018  

    It is that time of year again, at least in my parts... For certain vegetable crops - sweet potatoes, certain greens and the like - deer damage can be catastrophic. A pack of deer can graze down a tenth of an acre of sweet potatoes in just a night or two (Don’t ask me how I know…)... We put in rows of sweet potatoes whose sole purpose was to act as a sacrifice patch for any deer that made it over the fencing... Any sweet potatoes that do make it will then become food for our pigs, who will be rotated through the patch in the fall...

    What Farmers Need to Know About Mycorrhizae

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Nov 2, 2018  

    If someone asked you, “How do plants take up the water and nutrients they need?” you’d probably tell them through the roots. But did you know that for many crops, those roots aren’t working alone?That’s because most plant species associate with mycorrhizal fungi. What is mycorrhizal fungi? University of Alberta biological scientist JC Cahill says that mycorrhizas are actually the interaction between a fungus and a plant. Although there are many different types of mycorrhizae, the only one crop farmers need to be concerned about is arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), as 65% of plant species associate with it... AMF can also help plants resist and overcome pathogen infections, as the authors note that it’s well-documented that mycorrhizal associations protect tomato plants from Phytophthora parasitica and potato plants from Fusarium sambucinum...

    Categories: Cover Crops

    Early Blight & Late Blight | How to distinguish

    By Darren Chan

    Published Sep 17, 2019  

    Early blight and late blight are the most common diseases on tomato & potato. They usually take huge losses to farmers. Although the names of the two diseases are the only one-word difference, some growers do not know exactly about the difference between early blight and late blight. First, we need to how to recognize their symptoms. Difference between Early blight & Late blightCausesEarly blight is caused by two different closely related fungi, Alternaria tomatophila, and Alternaria solani, which lives in soil and plant debris...

    Categories: Irrigation, Organic, Wheat

    Insecticide Beauveria Bassiana Bed Bug Treatment

    By Darren Chan

    Published Mar 13  

    Have you used bio insecticide beauveria bassiana for bed bugs treatment? Beauveria bassiana is a parasite that grows in the soil around the world. It is used as a biopesticide to control many pests, particularly bed bugs, bugs, thrips, whiteflies, aphids, and distinct beetles. Beauveria bassiana is a non-toxic, odorless, and environmentally friendly product. It's constant infectivity to pests... Insecticide Beauveria Bassiana Control targetIt may control tadpoles, locusts, potato beetles, aphids, leafhoppers, planthoppers, an assortment of lepidopteran larvae like corn borer/pine caterpillar/peach heartworm / diploid borer...

    Categories: Agribusiness, Marketing, Organic

    Beauveria Bassiana Products Bed Bugs Control

    By Darren Chan

    Published Oct 15, 2019  

    Beauveria Bassiana fungus is a fungus that grows naturally in soils around the world. Acting as a parasite on various arthropod species, causing white muscardine disease; It widely used as a sprayed biological insecticide to control a great many pests such as bed bugs, termites, thrips, whiteflies, aphids, and different beetles. Once Beauveria Bassiana infects the host insects, the fungus grows fast inside of the insect’s body... Main Features(1) Wide SpectrumBeauveria Bassiana can parasitize more than 700 species of insects and mites of 15 orders and 149 families, such as Lepidoptera, Hymenoptera, Homoptera, with wings mesh and Orthoptera, such as adult, corn borer, moth, soybean sorghum budworm, weevil, potato beetle, small tea green leafhoppers, rice shell pest rice planthopper and rice leafhopper,, mole, grubs, wireworm, cutworms, garlic, leek, maggot maggots variety of underground and ground, etc ... It is currently used in the production of wheat, corn, peanuts, soybeans, potatoes, sweet potatoes, green Chinese onions, garlic, leeks, eggplant, peppers, tomatoes, watermelons, cucumbers, etc...

    Categories: Corn, Organic, Peanuts

    Welcome to Some Small Farm

    By John Moody

    Published Apr 3, 2018  

    Few of my family and friends would have ever expected me to become a farmer. I was that city kid, happy to play video games, hide from the sun, and grow my collection of Lego's and other toys far more than any interest in growing things like food. Life takes you surprising places, though, and 20 years later I found myself on 30+ acres of land, farming my family of seven and enjoying a country life that I never expected to find. I grew up in a blue collar (pipeline construction) family in northeast Ohio... Early potatoes will give way to peppers, tomatoes, or cucumbers...

    Field Trials - an often neglected but important tool for growers

    By John Moody

    Published May 29, 2018  

    How do you decide what to grow? Well, as I have explored in a few articles, there are many pieces of that puzzle to consider. You have to figure out what will be profitable... Two varieties of potatoes, grown side by side in the field, but completely different yields at harvest... ? During this stage, you should also be asking questions like - Would particular tools, techniques or infrastructure make this process easier and more profitable? If I scale up this crop, what infrastructure or issues may it create or changes will it require? For instance, a farmer friend decided to dramatically increase their sweet potato production. The growing side was fantastically well… but this success created a problem come harvest - the space that was normally set aside for other purposes was now needed for sweet potato curing...

    Dealing with Wild Weather

    By John Moody

    Published Jun 12, 2018  

    For much of the country, it has been a wild spring. For some, it has been a no spring. In my area we had an unseasonably long, late winter. Snow fell in the 3rd week of April... For instance, a fair bit of our bed space that was set aside for field lettuces, carrots, and similar crops is instead going into sweet potatoes, melons, or other warm season options...

    Profit per? Ways to think about, measure, and factors that impact fruit and vegetable profits

    By John Moody

    Published May 9, 2018  

    Profit... For instance, let’s compare potatoes and sweet potatoes... But sweet potatoes require post harvest curing, a process that requires a specialized space or facility. This task creates added labor and other expenses that standard potatoes don’t. If your sweet potatoes only command a small premium over potatoes, they may end up being less profitable because of the added labor and other expenses involved with getting them to market...

    Three legal and legislative items to keep an eye on

    By John Moody

    Published Jun 25, 2018  

    What a week! Summer is in full swing after no spring in these parts. But the growing season isn’t what has taken center stage of late. A number of major legal and political changes are happening or may happen that are going to impact the food and ag sector of the economy... Between FSMA, FSIS, USDA, FDA, labeling, cottage food laws, and a dozen other or more sets of regulations and requirements, it is a veritable gauntlet trying to sell someone something as simple as a steak or sweet potato... Past presidents have wanted to consolidate and streamline food regulation and safety int a single agency, but this is one hot political potato, with billions of dollars and all sorts of issues at stake...

  • Posted By John Moody
    May 9, 2018  

    https://agfuse.com/article/profit-per-ways-to-think-about-measure-and-factors-that-impact-fruit-and-vegetable-profits

    Posted By John Moody
    Apr 3, 2018  

    https://agfuse.com/article/welcome-to-some-small-farm

    Posted By John Moody
    May 21, 2018  

    https://agfuse.com/article/oh-deer-deer-damage-and-what-farmers-can-do-about-it

    Posted By Vegetable Production
    May 9, 2018  

    https://agfuse.com/article/profit-per-ways-to-think-about-measure-and-factors-that-impact-fruit-and-vegetable-profits

    Posted By Monica Pape
    Sep 30, 2018  

    1. Harvest what you can, if at all possible
    2. Clear field of all debris, especially any affected plant material including weeds
    3. Send a sample to a pathology lab to confirm whether bacterial or fungal. I’m leaning toward fungal, anthracnosis, however, a positive identification is better than my gut feeling. With a positive id, you can then decide what, if any bactericide or fungicide would be most effective or even cost effective at this point. You won't necessarily see a pest that might be potentially causing problems. Sometimes going out at night with a flashlight you are able to catch them in the act.
    4. If you haven’t had a soil test done, do it now and see where the pH is. Sometimes a pH adjustment can go a long way in complementing cultural practices and treatments that need to be done as well. It has been shown that liming can inhibit spore development. You still need to know the pH to determine a source, rate, and if it is even an option. If you're sending a soil test out include pH, OM, CEC, macros, micros, and if possible base saturation. Might as well get it all at one time.
    5. You may need to rotate out of potatoes and cabbage. Maybe for several years. Or invest in treated seed or field transplants that have been fumigated.
    6. I’d also suggest cover cropping with something like oats or rye. Oats have been shown to sequester toxins in animals. I don’t have any scientific proof of their remedial capabilities in soils. I really wish I did though. Normally I would suggest mustard. However, I’m not sure what the efficacy would be in this case. It’s just a consideration at this point. I still think your best bet is pH, looking at drainage issues, rotating, and using disease-resistant/treated varieties.
    7. Usually, bacterial/fungal issues are exacerbated by wetter than normal seasons and poor drainage. If drainage is an ongoing issue you may need to look at taking steps to alleviate it such as tiling or amending. Map/note where drainage issues are and affected plants are
    8. There is a lot of good info. at Cornell's website about bactericides/fungicides regarding efficacy, rates, etc.
    9. My gut could be wrong a lab diagnosis is more definitive than my gut and catch-all terms.
    10. If you have more questions, don't hesitate to email me at theaccidentalagronomist@gmail.com. I respond quicker to emails.

    Posted By Vegetable Production
    Jul 23, 2018  

    https://www.growingproduce.com/vegetables/helpful-tips-scouting-potato-fields-insect-pests/

    Posted By Agriculture, AgriTech And FoodTech
    Aug 30, 2017  

    Processing, Valorization and Application of Bio-Waste Derived Compounds from Potato, Tomato, Olive and Cereals: A Review

    Authors: Caroline Fritsch, Andreas Staebler, Anton Happel, Miguel Angel Cubero Márquez, Ingrid Aguiló-Aguayo, Maribel Abadias, Miriam Gallur, Ilaria Maria Cigognini, Angela Montanari, Maria Jose López, Francisca Suárez-Estrella, Nigel Brunton, Elisa Luengo, Laura Sisti, Maura Ferri and Gianluca Belotti

    Journal Title: Sustainability

    ISSN: 2071-1050 (Online)

    Publisher: MDPI AG

    The vast and ever-growing amount of agricultural and food wastes has become a major concern throughout the whole world. Therefore, strategies for their processing and value-added reuse are needed to enable a sustainable utilization of feedstocks and reduce the environmental burden. By-products of potato, tomato, cereals and olive arise in significant amounts in European countries and are consequently of high relevance. Due to their composition with various beneficial ingredients, the waste products can be valorized by different techniques leading to economic and environmental advantages. This paper focuses on the waste generation during industrial processing of potato, tomato, cereals and olives within the European Union and reviews state-of-the-art technologies for their valorization. Furthermore, current applications, future perspectives and challenges are discussed.

    Illustration Photo: Olive tree (Public Domain from Pixabay.com)

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    Posted By Michelle Grainger
    Aug 12  

    I have begun a new chapter and could not be more honored to have been selected as the next Executive Director for the NC SweetPotato Commission. Here's to all things #SweetPotatoes and #Agriculture! #FarmerStrong

    https://bit.ly/31LNMRC

    Posted By Rick Foster
    Jun 15  

    https://www.growingproduce.com/vegetables/why-ag-labor-reform-has-never-been-more-critical/

    Posted By Rutaksha Rawat
    Dec 22, 2019  

    https://www.pureecoindia.in/hydroponic-organic-farming-are-what-farmers-need-nitin-gadkari/
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