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285 Results

Search results for 'KY'

  • Kyle Turner United States, GA, Plains

    Interests: Ag Issues in Washington, Precision Ag

    Kyle Shermock United States, Minnesota, Minneapolis

    Job Title: Director of Wheat Procurement
    Interests: Corn, Cotton, Peanuts, Soybeans, Wheat, Beef Cattle, Dairy, Cover Crops, Ag Issues in Washington, Precision Ag, Organic, Irrigation, Marketing, Agribusiness

    Kyle Schultz

    Interests:

    Dan Grotsky Israel, Central District, Mazor

    Business Title: Groundwork BioAg
    Job Title: VP Sales and Marketing
    About: Dan Grotsky is a serial entrepreneur, business development executive and angel investor. Dan is Cofounder and VP Sales and Marketing at Groundwork BioAg, a company that produces mycorrhizal inoculants for commercial agriculture. His international experience ranges from information technology and communications to cleantech and agtech.
    Interests: Corn, Cotton, Peanuts, Soybeans, Wheat, Specialty/Vegetable, Rice, Grain Sorghum, Cover Crops, Organic, Marketing, Agribusiness

    Mikyas Teferi

    Interests:

    Jacky Merca Guatemala, Departamento de Sacatepequez, Antigua Guatemala

    Interests: Marketing, Technology Solutions

  • Kyle Turner United States, GA, Plains

    Interests: Ag Issues in Washington, Precision Ag

    Kyle Shermock United States, Minnesota, Minneapolis

    Job Title: Director of Wheat Procurement
    Interests: Corn, Cotton, Peanuts, Soybeans, Wheat, Beef Cattle, Dairy, Cover Crops, Ag Issues in Washington, Precision Ag, Organic, Irrigation, Marketing, Agribusiness

    Kyle Schultz

    Interests:

    Dan Grotsky Israel, Central District, Mazor

    Business Title: Groundwork BioAg
    Job Title: VP Sales and Marketing
    About: Dan Grotsky is a serial entrepreneur, business development executive and angel investor. Dan is Cofounder and VP Sales and Marketing at Groundwork BioAg, a company that produces mycorrhizal inoculants for commercial agriculture. His international experience ranges from information technology and communications to cleantech and agtech.
    Interests: Corn, Cotton, Peanuts, Soybeans, Wheat, Specialty/Vegetable, Rice, Grain Sorghum, Cover Crops, Organic, Marketing, Agribusiness

    Mikyas Teferi

    Interests:

    Jacky Merca Guatemala, Departamento de Sacatepequez, Antigua Guatemala

    Interests: Marketing, Technology Solutions

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  • Root Exudates 101: What They Do and Why They Matter

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Mar 23

    When you picture what’s happening below ground in your fields, you probably imagine a web of roots branching out to provide your crops support, nutrients and water. But root growth isn’t the only thing happening beneath the surface. Roots are also secreting chemical compounds, known as root exudates, which play an important role in both crop production and soil health. Released primarily from the root hairs and cells immediately behind the penetrating root tip, says an Agronomy for Sustainable Development article, root exudates attract and sustain a variety of microorganisms, like arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and nitrogen-cycling bacteria, in the rhizosphere, which is the zone of soil directly surrounding the roots... Some plants will produce more sticky root exudates made of polysaccharides, which are essentially sugar molecules bonded together...

    Categories: Cover Crops

    How Yield Champions Use Cover Crops for Growing Higher Bushels

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Jun 1, 2018

    There are many factors that can influence corn yield. In fact, Fred Below, a plant physiologist at the University of Illinois, identified seven of them, which he dubbed the “Seven Wonders of the Corn Yield World. ”The seven wonders, ranked in order of most influence on yield, are:WeatherNitrogenHybridPrevious cropPlant populationTillageGrowth regulatorsWhile Below was referring to the cash crop rotation in the fourth wonder, some farmers are taking it one step further by seeding cover crops. The benefit of added crop diversity along with improvements to soil health is paying off, as some of these farmers are achieving the highest yields in the country... His water infiltration rates have also skyrocketed from ½-1 inch per hour to now 6-7 inches per hour...

    How to Use the SmartMix Calculator to Create the Perfect Cover Crop Mix

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Sep 5, 2019

    When it comes to creating a cover crop mix, the options are endless. You need to determine what kind of species you’ll use, how many you’ll use, and at what seeding rates. For anyone new to cover crop blends, these decisions can be overwhelming. Fortunately, there are several free tools available today that can guide both new and experienced cover crop users through the process of developing their own mix... When you click on the “Add Species” button you’ll see cover crops separated into four categories: excellent, good, marginal and risky...

    Categories: Cover Crops

    Early Cover Crop Benefits: What Can You Expect in the First Year?

    By Laura Barrera

    Published May 17, 2018

    In 1995, Pennsylvania farmer Steve Groff was speaking at an event when he asked the audience the question: Do cover crops pay off?His thinking at the time was that he had been no-tilling since 1982, and maybe if he no-tilled long enough, he wouldn’t need them. Ray Weil, a soil ecologist with the University of Maryland, happened to hear his question and approached Groff about doing a cover crop study on his farm. It turned into a 12-year project, from 1995 to 2007. It was in 1999, four years into it, Groff got the answer to his question... “If you have 3-foot deep topsoil in Illinois, you’re not going to see a dramatic difference in the soil as you would in maybe another soil that’s on a hillside, or rocky, or sandier,” he says...

    Categories: Cover Crops

    So Good They Can't Ignore You: How to get attention as a young farmer

    By Farmers Under Forty

    Published May 18, 2018

    For aspiring young farmers, often times the only thing standing in the way of them and their dreams of farming on their own is a chance. Starting a farm is tough. It’s tough if you are starting with help from your family and it’s even tougher to start from scratch on your own. Farming is a game of scale which means that your best chance of surviving and thriving is to accumulate a large enough land base to realize machinery, labor and overhead efficiencies... Someone once said they’d rather be lucky than good...

    Categories: Agribusiness

    How Brazilian Big Agriculture is Destroying the Brazilian Amazon

    By Maria Dampman

    Published Apr 4, 2018

    The rampant deforestation of the Amazon began in the 1970s when the government of Brazil determined they needed to build over 9,000 miles of roads help integrate the rainforest with the populated bordering areas. As the deeper parts of the rainforest became accessible, development of these lands became possible, and once begun, continued at an alarming rate. Farmers, loggers and cattle ranchers cleared forest to create grazing land as well as to grow highly profitable crops like soy... To make this even clearer, beef imports skyrocketed from 86,000 MT CWE in 2012 to 825,000 MT CWE in 2016... With little entertainment available other than alcohol and drugs, these children fall into the despair that is fueling the skyrocketing suicide rates...

    Nutrient Stratification Not a Problem in No-Till

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Aug 13, 2018

    A common concern growers may have when they move to a no-till system is nutrient stratification. Without tillage to mix fertilizer into the soil, no-tillers may wonder whether the nutrients applied to the soil surface are reaching the crop roots. According to University of Nebraska Extension engineer Paul Jasa and Ray Ward, plant scientist and founder of Ward Laboratories in Kearney, Neb. , the resounding answer is: yes, they are... According to a paper written by University of Kentucky soil scientist John Grove, Ward and University of Maryland soil scientist Ray Weil, research conducted in Kentucky from 1980-81 looked at corn’s uptake of surface-applied potassium under moldboard plowed and no-tilled plots that were established in 1970...

    Categories: Corn, Cover Crops

    Starting from Scratch - How Beginning Farmers can Break Ground

    By Gregory Heilers

    Published Sep 9, 2018

    Despite the fact that there is near-guaranteed job security, thanks to booming population growth, many beginning farmers face seemingly insurmountable obstacles to bringing a product to market. In this article, we’re going to cover how young farmers can start from the ground up, even if they don’t come from a family of farmers. Informing this subject is Jason Silverman, the Massachusetts Field Agent of Land For Good, and Joel Salatin, co-owner of Polyface Farm. Jason’s experience as a first generation farmer, and as an agent connecting farmers with resources, balances well with Joel’s, who took over the family farm, and has since mentored scores of intern cohorts... By not “getting in over their heads at first, even if it means a backyard garden and a flock of chickens,” beginning farmers can continue to grow their skills and work towards a future of farming...

    Categories: Agribusiness

    Learn about wildfire safety and fire prevention tips

    By Nationwide Farm Insurance

    Published Jun 3, 2019

    The combination of increased risk and high-value assets makes fire protection at farms and ranches a high priority. The first step in minimizing the fire and wildfire risk is increased knowledge and awareness. It's never too early to prepare. Take several basic steps right now to protect your family, farm/ranch and property from disaster... (IL, IN, IA, KS, KY, MO, NE, OH) (PDF)Great Lakes (MI, MN, WI) (PDF)Mid-Atlantic & Northeast (CT, DE, ME, MD, NH, NY, PA, RI, WV, VT, VA) (PDF)Pacific Northwest (ID, Northern CA, OR, WA) (PDF)Rocky Mountain (CO, MT, ND, SD, UT, WY) (PDF)Southern California (PDF)Southeast (AL, AR, GA, MS, NC, SC, TN) (PDF)Southwest (AZ, NM, NV, OK, TX) (PDF)Wildfire safety and risk management brochures Learn how to create defensible space and decrease wildfire risk around your property with the following quick reference brochures:Reducing wildfire risk for farms and ranches (PDF)Reducing wildfire risk for homeowners (PDF)Learn more about protecting your business from wildfires...

    Categories: Agribusiness

    Recent College Grad? Why Now Is The Perfect Time To Pursue A Career In Farming

    By Cortney Farmer

    Published Apr 17, 2018

    The U. S. agricultural industry finds itself at a precarious professional crossroads. Recent decades have resulted in a steady and significant decline in the number of working farmers in our country, for a variety of reasons... As long as bio-engineers and growers can use skyscrapers and other city features to cultivate plants and animal life, modern-day farmers can opt to perfect their professional trade in regions that best suit their personal preferences and tastes...

  • Posted By Cortney Farmer
    Apr 17, 2018

    https://agfuse.com/article/recent-college-grad-why-now-is-the-perfect-time-to-pursue-a-career-in-farming

    Posted By Farmers Under Forty
    May 18, 2018

    https://agfuse.com/article/so-good-they-can-039-t-ignore-you-how-to-get-attention-as-a-young-farmer

    Posted By The Crossover
    Mar 29, 2018

    https://agfuse.com/article/the-critical-state-of-agriculture-1

    Posted By Gregory Heilers
    Jun 10, 2018

    This is a great point, Mark. I totally agree that trade skills are "endangered." The stereotypical "farm laborer" certainly possesses some of these skills, and I appreciate your point that outsourcing those is very costly.

    On the farm I have most recent experience working on, my dad's lucky to have a wonderful jack of all trades. This man has his own shop a dozen miles from the farm, where he can repair almost any malfunctioning machinery, and he just charges the $20/hr he does for any other work on farm. That same work done in town would cost significantly more, plus you'd need to add time and fuel costs for loading, hauling, and unloading the equipment - both ways.

    I think Joel Salatin was also, in part, speaking to your point when he mentioned that he'd “take the guy who can move 5,000 chickens in 60 minutes with nothing more than a hand dolly over the technocrat.” The quote taken out of context doesn't perfectly align, but I believe the sentiment is similar.

    I appreciate your thoughts, and the fact that you are bringing a wealth of expertise to an industry that certainly will benefit from it!

    Posted By Cover Crops
    May 18, 2018

    https://agfuse.com/article/early-cover-crop-benefits-what-can-you-expect-in-the-first-year-

    Posted By Monica Pape
    Feb 8, 2018

    The Accidental Agronomist is partnering with Nick Burton and State of the Soil to give you and your friends a chance to win an all-access pass to The State of The Soil Virtual Summit Year 2 February 19-25,2018.

    This Year’s Summit Will Focus on advanced marketing, business strategies, and farm-life balance. Already listed as one of the top online platforms by Ag Funder News based on last year’s inaugural event.

    Take part in a year of learning from Industry leaders like Henry Gordon-Smith, Agritecture, Allison Kopf, Agrilyst, Michael Kilpatrick In The Field Consultants Halley Brake Upstart University & lot's more.

    You’ll be entered to win by simply sharing this post and signing up for The Accidental Agronomists Newsletter at www.theaccidentalagronomist.com

    Three lucky winners will be picked at random and notified by email!

    Contest Runs February 8-16,2018

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    Posted By Farmers Under Forty
    Sep 20, 2018

    https://www.no-tillfarmer.com/articles/8175-podcast-its-all-about-carbon-building-a-thriving-soil-biological-community

    Posted By Rodney Michael
    May 30, 2018

    Benefits of living large in a tiny home.  From new Agfuse member Kevin May's LandHub.com blog:  https://www.landhub.com/blog/living-the-life-of-luxury-with-tiny-house-living/

    Posted By Laura Barrera
    May 17, 2018

    https://agfuse.com/article/early-cover-crop-benefits-what-can-you-expect-in-the-first-year-

    Posted By Scott Kehler
    Jun 13, 2017

    Slight risk of severe storms today in southern Manitoba along the US border. The main risks with any storms that develop will be hail around nickel size, strong winds of 90-100 km/h, and heavy rain. Storms are expected to develop in North Dakota this afternoon and then push into southern Manitoba. A higher risk for severe storms exists in North Dakota and Minnesota, especially south and east of Fargo, where tornadoes will be possible. Keep an eye on the sky today if you live in the risk area!

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