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Search results for 'New York'

  • Herbert Kliegerman United States, NY, New York

    Business Title: IGrowGroupE, LLC
    Job Title: Founder
    About: I am the Founder of The American Association of Urban Farmers and iGrow News: https://www.igrow.news/
    Interests: Organic Row Crops, Marketing, Agribusiness, Microgreens

    Matt Smith United States, NY, New York

    Job Title: Crop Consultant
    Interests: Accounting and Bookkeeping, Human Resources, Succession Planning, Taxes, Purchasing

    Steve Weir United States, NY, Riverhead

    Business Title: State University Of New York At Cobleskill
    Job Title: Ag Investor, Extension Agent or University Employee, Other Ag Professional, Farm Finance and Mgmt Consultant
    Interests: Sustainable Agriculture, Precision Agriculture, Agribusiness, Farm Management

    Mack PCE United States, NY, New York

    Interests: Agribusiness

    Phylicia M. United States, NY, New York

    Business Title: Bekor
    Job Title: Ag Sales Strategist
    Interests: Vegetables, Marketing, Agribusiness

    Earnest Washington United States, NY, New York

    Interests: Vegetables, Beef, Swine, Agribusiness, Buffalo

    Ayana Sual United States, NY, New York

    Interests: Corn, Sorghum, Beef, Dairy, Poultry, Cover Crops, Agribusiness

    Nate Harriger United States, NY, New York

    Interests: Corn, Soybeans, Wheat, Beef, Dairy, Poultry, Swine

  • Herbert Kliegerman United States, NY, New York

    Business Title: IGrowGroupE, LLC
    Job Title: Founder
    About: I am the Founder of The American Association of Urban Farmers and iGrow News: https://www.igrow.news/
    Interests: Organic Row Crops, Marketing, Agribusiness, Microgreens

    Matt Smith United States, NY, New York

    Job Title: Crop Consultant
    Interests: Accounting and Bookkeeping, Human Resources, Succession Planning, Taxes, Purchasing

    Steve Weir United States, NY, Riverhead

    Business Title: State University Of New York At Cobleskill
    Job Title: Ag Investor, Extension Agent or University Employee, Other Ag Professional, Farm Finance and Mgmt Consultant
    Interests: Sustainable Agriculture, Precision Agriculture, Agribusiness, Farm Management

    Mack PCE United States, NY, New York

    Interests: Agribusiness

    Phylicia M. United States, NY, New York

    Business Title: Bekor
    Job Title: Ag Sales Strategist
    Interests: Vegetables, Marketing, Agribusiness

    Earnest Washington United States, NY, New York

    Interests: Vegetables, Beef, Swine, Agribusiness, Buffalo

    Ayana Sual United States, NY, New York

    Interests: Corn, Sorghum, Beef, Dairy, Poultry, Cover Crops, Agribusiness

    Nate Harriger United States, NY, New York

    Interests: Corn, Soybeans, Wheat, Beef, Dairy, Poultry, Swine

  • AgTech News By Agroop

    Public
    News, articles and opinion pieces on AgTech.
    Interest: Precision Agriculture

    Ag Industry News And Insights

    Public
    Here’s a place to spread the word concerning announcements and insights that the whole ag industry may be interested in.
    Interest: Corn, Cotton, Peanuts, Soybeans, Wheat, Vegetables, Rice, Canola, Sorghum, Beef, Dairy, Poultry, Swine, Cover Crops, Ag Policy, Precision Agriculture, Organic Row Crops, Irrigation, Timber, Marketing, Agribusiness

    Cotton News

    Public
    A group dedicated to all things cotton!
    Interest: Cotton, Precision Agriculture, Irrigation, Marketing, Agribusiness

    Organic Citrus

    Public
    We are interested in gathering experiences, solutions and history of organic methods in citrus production. As well as record and document unique policy and market access hurdles organic citrus growers face in each different region of the world.
    Interest: Organic Row Crops, Crop Protection, Fertility, Irrigation, Soil Health, Sustainable Agriculture, Apps, Precision Agriculture, Telemetry, Ag Commentary, Marketing, News, Ag Policy, Agribusiness, Farm Management, Farmland and Real Estate, Operating a Farm, Conservation Easements, Conservation Plans, Cover Crops, Orchard Crops, Organic Specialty Crops, Homesteading

    AgFunder

    Public
    A digitally native foodtech and agtech venture capital firm with an active media arm in AgFunderNews.com
    Interest: Cover Crops, Ag Policy, Precision Agriculture, Organic Row Crops, Irrigation, Timber, Marketing, Agribusiness

    AgTech

    Public
    The latest news on the innovative technology in the agricultural industry
    Interest: Corn, Cotton, Peanuts, Soybeans, Wheat, Vegetables, Rice, Canola, Sorghum, Beef, Dairy, Poultry, Swine, Cover Crops, Ag Policy, Precision Agriculture, Organic Row Crops, Irrigation, Timber, Marketing, Agribusiness

    AgNet West Radio Network

    Public
    California and Arizona real farm radio, providing current, relevant, and interesting agriculture news. We are proud to serve the agriculture community. AgNet West is based in California.
    Interest: Corn, Cotton, Canola

    Farm Shifts

    Public
    Looking to transition to more sustainable practices? Wanting to get out of your current industry and into a new one? Experiencing a generational management shift? This group is intended to be a supportive and informational hub for ag folks that want to diversify or change their current systems.
    Interest: Organic Row Crops, Beef, Dairy

  • Plant genome research to find genes that adapt to harsh climates

    By Isla Miller

    Published Nov 24 

    A new study identifies the genetic basis behind the adaptation strategies used by plants to cope with the harsh natural environment. These adaptation strategies include enriching the growth-promoting bacteria in the roots and actively selecting genes necessary for survival, which may be used to guide the cultivation of crops to make them more adaptable to climate change. In an era of accelerating climate change, it is vital to reveal the genetic basis for increasing crop yield and resilience under drought and malnutrition conditions, said Gloria Coruzzi, a professor in the Department of Biology and the Center for Genomics and Systems Biology at New York University... Next, researchers at New York University used high-performance computing clusters to conduct systematic genome analysis, comparing the genome sequences of 32 Atacama plants with 32 unsuitable but genetically similar sister species and several other model species for comparison... By studying the ecosystems in the natural environment, we can identify the genetic and molecular processes that each species adapts to in the face of a common harsh environment, said Viviana Araus of the University of Ponticia, Católica de Chile, a former professor of genomics at New York University...

    Categories: News

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    Oh deer! Deer damage and what farmers can do about it

    By John Moody

    Published May 21, 2018 

    It is that time of year again, at least in my parts... “ Farmers report more crop damage by deer - Outdoornews State game commissioners got an earful about increased crop damage by deer at their recent meeting... Farmers report more crop damage by deer - Outdoornews State game commissioners got an earful about increased crop damage by deer at their recent meeting... The use of dogs contained within Off-Limits Crop Protection Systems has been shown to be an effective way to reduce deer damage in orchards in New York State... )” Perhaps manufacturers have figured this out and newer models are more effective...

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    Retirement Tax Planning for Farmers

    By Tyler Davis

    Published Mar 15, 2020 

    The decision to retire is often met with either enthusiasm or fear. Some farmers are counting down the days until retirement, and others are scared to retire because they aren’t sure what they will do without work. Many farmers who have worked so hard for decades have not developed any hobbies outside of farming. The decision to retire is often one of uncertainty... Some states, such as California, New York, New Jersey, Iowa, and Oregon impose extremely high tax rates for individuals...

    Categories: Ag Policy, Agribusiness

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    I have a dirty mind because

    By Monica Pape

    Published Mar 12, 2018 

    I Think Like an AgronomistThe idea of thinking like an agronomist has come up in several conversations lately. I was at a conference recently and asked how I would have answered a question asked by a farmer. I turned to the sale rep and said that I wouldn't have answered it. I would have asked more questions... Fast forward about 20 years, and I find myself on a farm in New York working as a sales agronomist...

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    How farmers can help eradicate world hunger – in 10 steps

    By AgTech News By Agroop

    Published Sep 21, 2018 

    Worldwide, there’s enough food to feed everyone – and yet, one out of nine people suffer from chronic hunger... An increasingly hungry world“In September 2015, 193 countries at the UN Sustainable Development Summit in New York adopted Agenda 2030 and the 17 Sustainable Development Goals... That is why farmers should “find new, more productive ways to farm food and diversify their crops... Cut post-harvest lossesBy using “adequate storage facilities,” adopting new technologies and “undergoing relevant training,” farmers can greatly reduce post-harvest losses... Educate the farmers of the futureFAO recommends that farms and agribusinesses help educate a new generation of farmers – thereby increasing their workforce and producing more food...

    Categories: Precision Agriculture

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    Indoor Farming Technology Market Will Hit Big Revenues In Future

    By Rupali Patil

    Published 2 hours ago 

    According to the new market research report “Indoor Farming Technology Market by Growing System (Hydroponics, Aeroponics, Aquaponics, Soil-based, Hybrid), Facility Type, Component, Crop Type (Fruits & Vegetables, Herbs & Microgreens, Flowers & Ornamentals), and Region – Global Forecast to 2026″, published by MarketsandMarkets™, the market size is estimated to account for a value of USD 14. 5 billion in 2020 and is projected to grow at a CAGR 9. 4% from 2020, to reach a value of USD 24... Through research conducted at the Lighting Research Center (New York), the impact of LED lighting on plants was studied, and it showed positive results... New technologies need to be developed to decrease the carbon footprint in indoor farming...

    Categories: Agribusiness, Farm Management

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    Flags Across the Harvest

    By Ray Bohacz

    Published Nov 6 

    The Bohacz and Demchuk Families entered this blessed land more than 120 years ago, through Ellis Island, from their birth in Ukraine, disembarking in New York City. As a child, our small family had relatives that spanned from the western tip of Long Island to northwestern New Jersey, where I hail from... Traveling east from Queens, New York (a borough of NYC), you enter Nassau County, no longer part of the city... We were stopped at the new traffic light... After the engine shut off, the final sound I heard was the air brakes discharging, a metaphoric bell tolling the end of the life I knew...

    Categories: Ag Commentary

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    How to Time Cover Crop Termination and Get an Effective Burndown

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Jul 1, 2019 

    With May 2018 to April 2019 being the wettest 12-month period on record, according to NOAA, many farmers across the nation were forced to delay planting. In fact, for the first time on record, less than half of corn was planted by May 19, says the USDA. Even by June 2, “both corn and soybean planting were proceeding at a record slow pace. ”For those with cover crops, these wet conditions likely affected their termination plans, causing some to debate whether they should terminate before or after planting. Penn State Extension Educator and Agronomist Heidi Reed says she saw several farmers in York County, Pa...

    Categories: Cover Crops

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    How Feasible is Organic Corn?

    By Vijayalaxmi Kinhal

    Published Aug 14, 2020 

    Organic corn is both economically viable and technically feasible. Even though organic corn yield is 32% lesser, the prices are double that of conventional corn, guaranteeing attractive returns on investment (ROI) to growers. Moreover, there is growing technical information available to advise organic corn production. Growing Demand for Organic CornThe demand for organic corn is expected to grow globally at a CAGR of 1. 9% and amount to 1170 million USD by 2026...

    Categories: Corn, Organic Row Crops

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    How to Cultivate Cotton Organically

    By Vijayalaxmi Kinhal

    Updated Oct 24, 2020 

    Though most of the organic cotton in the world comes from Asia, Texas in the USA is also a major producer. Although specific growing methods may vary based on region and farm size, there are general principles that can be applied throughout the world when it comes to growing organic cottonEconomicsThere are many reasons to grow cotton organically. The market share of organic cotton has grown from 1% in 2008 to 21% in 2018. Half of this is grown in India, with China (17%), Kyrgyzstan (7%), and Turkey (7%) being the next major producers... New precision equipment needed for irrigation can be used with old machinery too...

    Categories: Cotton, Organic Specialty Crops, Sustainable Agriculture

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  • What are the few things to keep in mind for farming as new farmer?

    By Zubair Ahmad

    Published Mar 18, 2020 

    My question is related to farming please help me by answering my question. Thank you.

    Categories: Wheat, Dairy, Irrigation

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  • Posted By AgFuse Administrator
    Oct 19, 2016 

    "New York's organic farming has grown over the past several years, led by milk sales, with agricultural land federally certified organic expanding to 934 operating farms last year, according to the state comptroller's office."
    http://www.agweb.com/article/report-organic-farming-in-new-york-keeps-growing-naa-associated-press/

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    Posted By Mark Smith
    May 24 

    #AgHistory This is one I think you will find interesting - the history of transportation costs, and the impact of the Eerie Canal on wheat flour prices in New York. From 1800-1840, most roads to market were little more than tracks through the woods, where the trees had been cleared but the stumps, a foot to a foot and a half high, remained. Imagine hauling a loaded wagon over this! Henry Carter Adams (Professor of economics at University of Michigan) wrote in 1899, it would take two ox teams 3 days to travel 25 miles. In Indiana, it cost 50 cents for every 100 pounds, per each 20 miles traveled. At these rates, corn could not be shipped more than 20 miles before it was grown at a loss. Wheat could not be profitably transported more than 50-75 miles. In 1825 things began to change with the opening of the Eerie canal. According to Israel D. Andrews in a report to the Secretary of the Treasury on the 'Trade of the Great Lakes and Rivers' "Previous to the opening of the canal, transportation from Lake Eerie to tide-water was such as to prevent all movement of merchandise" "The cost to transport from Buffalo to New York was $100/ton and took about 20 days at a cost of nearly 3 times the market value of wheat in New York, 6 times the value of corn, 12 times the value of oats", and far exceeded the value of most cured provisions. Because of the Eerie canal, western wheat was being used in New England by both farmers and 'city folks'. David Field, a historian for Berkshire County, Massachusetts, recorded in 1829 that the local cultivation of wheat and rye had diminished with the opening the Eerie canal, with more wheat being transported at cheaper cost into the county than what could be grown and transported out of it. Clearly, the market value of any agricultural commodity, and its availability to consumers, will always have transportation costs imbedded into the market value. As was demonstrated with cereal grains in New England, history shows us that when transportation costs exceed market value, then that commodity will eventually disappear form the market, or will never arrive in the first place. The New England Farmer printed in 1838-39 "If more fertile regions can supply our cities with grain at a cheaper rate than we can, let us not lament. We shall find full employment in furnishing what cannot be so well transported from a distance. Fresh meats, butter, hay and the small market vegetables must be supplied by the farmers of New England."
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    Posted By Mark Smith
    May 3 

    #AgHistory Agriculture is about food, fuel, and fiber, and how these are critical to our society. In particular, this week I will share what I hope is an interesting history of hemp (fiber) and its history here in the United States. Note that our country still imports billions of dollars in hemp fiber each year (https://www.ers.usda.gov/webdocs/publications/41740/15867_ages001e_1_.pdf?v=0), and our U.S. Navy still uses this imported hemp rope, canvas and line. There are several synthetic products that have one or two superior qualities, but no synthetic possesses the 'whole package' - durable, salt water and UV resistant, rot resistant, breaking strength, etc. In fact, Purdue University has identified hemp fiber as potentially one crop that can 'save' American Agriculture as sustainable crop which is comparable to Sudan grass as a cover crop, as well as an alternate to other synthetic fibers. I happen to agree (https://hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/ncnu02/pdf/small.pdf). First, growing fiber for local use was common in England and it should be no surprise that hemp (fiber)was one of the first crops in New England, New York and Pennsylvania. One of the earliest laws of Connecticut required every family to raise half a pound of hemp or flax. The amount grown varied and was largely dependent on the ability of the population to prepare, spin, and weave fiber. In New England, the population was very reliant on cotton imported from the West Indies until the introduction of linen spinning wheel as well as the immigration of Scotch-Irish who were very skilled in linen spinning and the manufacture of linen, in the early 1700's. Lest one think this an easy process, please know that it is very labor intensive. In spite of this, New England farmers were bent on finding a staple that could be sold to a wide market. None the less, the volume of hemp necessary to sell to a wide market was never achieved and the crop failed as a staple as it had to compete with limited arable and cleared land being used to grow grain crops. It was noted in the book 'American Husbandry' (1775) "...it is not for want of good land in certain quantities, nor the climate, that prevents the export of hemp, but the demand for it in Philadelphia..." In 1840 most experts of the time believed that Kentucky and Missouri led hemp production with Indiana, Illinois, and Ohio following. Americans forget how reliant we are as a society on fiber, and this came into glaring focus when the Japanese invasions of the pacific islands during WWII blocked our traditional supply routes for fiber. Every hemp seed available in the U.S. was placed under armed guard in Kentucky as a national security and war effort concern. USDA Hemp for Victory - (https://youtu.be/bIxFhYVv_Gk). Additionally, every farmer should read the Purdue report and consider the impact of this commodity on our society.

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    Posted By Ray Bohacz
    Oct 18 

    Many farmers, regardless of the size of their operation or its focus, are looking to pursue other revenue streams such as direct marketing, agritourism, and opening their land to other uses such as camping, etc.
    On the surface this is a good business mindset that is well established by large companies for many years. John Deere for example, sells push lawn mowers and combines. Thus, the theory of expanding from your core business is sound and has the potential to be profitable. But there are pitfalls that must be recognized before you invest the first dollar.
    Coming from New Jersey, a state that is being encroached on my New York City to the east and Philadelphia to the south, many have gone down this path, especially the families that were in the once dynamic and thriving dairy sector.
    Please know the following observation is from experience and is only meant as an opinion for you to embrace, explore, or outrightly reject.
    During this transition the common denominator I have seen is an anxiousness to invest in tangible items such as a nice building, beautiful landscaping, and a fancy sign as a means to bring people in.
    What is ignored without exception, is the people skills that need to be in place for the tangible investment to be an investment and pay dividends.
    Simply put if you want to have any direct contact and exchange either your product or experience with the end user, you need to have what I call, "the heart of a servant."
    You are NOT doing the world a favor by opening an adjunct business.
    The money you invest in the tangible will not translate to success if the buying experience falls short of the customer's expectations.
    The people skills of those that engage the public, even in the most seemingly minor way, are more important than anything else.
    Your fancy signs and pretty structures will quickly evaporate in your customer's mind if they do not have a wonderful experience or are treated rudely or with indifference.
    All you need to do is put yourself in the customer's place. Think of the different buying experiences you have had over your lifetime, regardless of if it is a $5.00 hamburger or a $500,000.00 combine.
    I have seen so many families look at this alternative revenue stream as a hope to save their operation and it ends up putting them out of business.
    Being able to grow a pumpkin, build a wedding barn, or cut a corn maize is the least of the equation for success. Just as a college degree and nice clothes may get you the interview and possibly the job for a short while, but not a career.
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    Glocal's Accelerator Program for Startups and mid – sized companies in the Agribusiness Sector

    Glocal is the first Latin American Accelerator for both, startups and mid – sized established companies in the Agribusiness Sector.

    We area focus on farming and foods industry (agritech, biotech, agri-fintech, agri-insuretech).

    Application Deadline: April 30, 2020

    Illustration Photo: Vegetables growing at urban farm 1803 FarmOne New York (credits: ACME / Flickr Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC 2.0))

    Check more https://adalidda.com/posts/auZP67R29LzgekShw/glocal-s-accelerator-program-for-startups-and-mid-sized

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    Call for applications: Accelerator Program FAN 2020 for Agrifood Startups

    Application deadline: March 10, 2020 at 6pm CET

    You can apply for the following location: Bilbao, Munich, Helsinki, Lausanne, Haifa, Cambridge

    Illustration Photo: Urban farm FarmOne New York (credits: ACME / Flickr Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC 2.0))

    Check more https://adalidda.com/posts/ktuxbJQ8K8XjpeXid/call-for-applications-accelerator-program-fan-2020-for

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    Call for applications: Food Future Accelerator Program for AgTech and FoodTech Startups

    Food Future is a Scale-Up Accelerator for established yet small organizations (on track to grossing more than $1 million annually) that are providing unique products and solutions across our food system.

    -We support companies with scale-up business models through consulting, global distribution, financing, operation scaling, and financial exit.

    -We partner with advisors and mentors that not only provide expertise, but support impact, mission, and setting cultural trends.

    -Four to six companies will be selected for each cohort cycle, which runs for 6 months.

    -Cohort companies will receive in-kind value of up to $100k per company.

    Application deadline for Cohort 7: June 1st, 2020

    Illustration Photo: Urban farm FarmOne New York (credits: ACME / Flickr Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC 2.0))

    Check more https://adalidda.com/posts/3rMoN4vG7thKNoceA/call-for-applications-food-future-accelerator-program-for

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    Call for applications: FoodStars Programme for Early-Stage Agri-Food Startups

    FoodStars (an initiative of World Startup Factory and Truvalu.startups) drives innovations and entrepreneurship in agriculture and the food chain to secure the Dutch position as the most sustainable and circular food producer.

    We invite startups who are working on pieces of this puzzle to step forward and join our ecosystem to increase the chance of running a successful business with a real impact for a better world. We are looking for startups in various areas like food wastage, horticulture, control farming.

    Application Deadline: 31 December 2019

    Illustration Photo: Horticulture at the Urban Farm FarmOne in New York (credits: ACME / Flickr Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC 2.0))

    Check more https://adalidda.com/posts/y3sRcFucfr7Tq4BG9/call-for-applications-foodstars-programme-for-early-stage

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    The Application of Mobile Edge Computing in Agricultural Water Monitoring System

    Authors: D H Fan and S Gao

    Published under licence by IOP Publishing Ltd
    IOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science, Volume 191, conference

    The intelligent construction and development of traditional agricultural water production process has become an important pillar industry in China's coastal areas. With the application of IoT technology, the agricultural water monitoring process can manage the data collected by the sensor system in real time. In this paper, a data link management solution is proposed in combination with advanced Mobile Edge Computing (MEC) technology, which effectively realizes the sinking of business anchor points and greatly reduces the business response time. The practical application shows that the scheme realizes the network and intelligence of agricultural water monitoring system management, and has broad market prospect.

    Illustration Photo: IBM Researcher Mike Kelly (left) and RPI University researcher, Larry Eichler (right) deploy a Dublin City University Water Institute sensor with IBM's IoT technology to help protect and conserve natural resources on Lake George in New York State. (credits: IBM / Flickr Creative Commons Attribution-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic (CC BY-ND 2.0))

    Check more https://adalidda.com/posts/gDfZAge3DJLDSQfK4/the-application-of-mobile-edge-computing-in-agricultural
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    Study reveals best use of wildflowers to benefit crops on farms

    For the first time, a Cornell University study of strawberry crops on New York farms tested this theory and found that wildflower strips on farms added pollinators when the farm lay within a "Goldilocks zone," where 25 to 55 percent of the surrounding area contained natural lands. Outside this zone, flower plantings also drew more strawberry pests, while having no effect on wasps that kill those pests.

    Photo: This is a bumblebee foraging on a cup plant. Cup plants attracted the most bees to wildflower strips, according to a survey done by Cornell researchers. (credit: Heather Grab)

    Check more https://adalidda.com/posts/bHaqq8nAqQwZBkDhD/study-reveals-best-use-of-wildflowers-to-benefit-crops-on
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