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Search results for 'Oak'

  • Oakley Kauffman United States, OK, Carmen

    Business Title: Farmers Cooperative
    Interests: Ag Policy, Agribusiness, Cover Crops, Precision Agriculture, Canola, Corn, Sorghum, Soybeans, Wheat, Beef

    Nicole Otte United States, CA, Thousand Oaks

    Business Title: AGRONOMICS
    Job Title: Other Ag Professional, Chef
    Interests: Rice, Soybeans, Wheat, Crop Protection, Irrigation, Soil Health, Sustainable Agriculture, Organic Specialty Crops

    Kevin Willis United States, WV, Oak Hill

    Business Title: Upsondownsfarms
    Job Title: Farmer, Rancher, Landowner
    Interests: Beef, Feed, Poultry, Swine, Grass-Fed Livestock, Specialty Livestock, Ag Commentary, News, Marketing, Operating a Farm, Farm Management, Farmland and Real Estate, Projects, Purchasing, Repair, Timber

    Jeremy Rhodes United States, NC, Four Oaks

    Business Title: Cal -Tay LLC.
    Interests: Vegetables, Beef, Irrigation

    Victoria Vegis United States, CA, Oakland

    Business Title: Foris.io
    Interests: Ag Policy, Cover Crops, Irrigation, Organic Row Crops, Precision Agriculture

    Melissa Rouse United States, CA, Oakland

    Business Title: Food System 6 Accelerator
    Job Title: Communications Director
    About: Melissa is a writer and editor with a passion for food system change. She is dedicated to supporting small and mid-sized organizations with big-picture plans for the betterment of local and global food communities.
    Interests: Ag Policy, Agribusiness, Cover Crops, Irrigation, Marketing, Organic Row Crops, Precision Agriculture, Vegetables, Beef, Dairy, Swine, Poultry

    Philip Huang United States, CA, Thousand Oaks

    Interests: Organic Row Crops, Marketing, Agribusiness

  • Oakley Kauffman United States, OK, Carmen

    Business Title: Farmers Cooperative
    Interests: Ag Policy, Agribusiness, Cover Crops, Precision Agriculture, Canola, Corn, Sorghum, Soybeans, Wheat, Beef

    Nicole Otte United States, CA, Thousand Oaks

    Business Title: AGRONOMICS
    Job Title: Other Ag Professional, Chef
    Interests: Rice, Soybeans, Wheat, Crop Protection, Irrigation, Soil Health, Sustainable Agriculture, Organic Specialty Crops

    Kevin Willis United States, WV, Oak Hill

    Business Title: Upsondownsfarms
    Job Title: Farmer, Rancher, Landowner
    Interests: Beef, Feed, Poultry, Swine, Grass-Fed Livestock, Specialty Livestock, Ag Commentary, News, Marketing, Operating a Farm, Farm Management, Farmland and Real Estate, Projects, Purchasing, Repair, Timber

    Jeremy Rhodes United States, NC, Four Oaks

    Business Title: Cal -Tay LLC.
    Interests: Vegetables, Beef, Irrigation

    Victoria Vegis United States, CA, Oakland

    Business Title: Foris.io
    Interests: Ag Policy, Cover Crops, Irrigation, Organic Row Crops, Precision Agriculture

    Melissa Rouse United States, CA, Oakland

    Business Title: Food System 6 Accelerator
    Job Title: Communications Director
    About: Melissa is a writer and editor with a passion for food system change. She is dedicated to supporting small and mid-sized organizations with big-picture plans for the betterment of local and global food communities.
    Interests: Ag Policy, Agribusiness, Cover Crops, Irrigation, Marketing, Organic Row Crops, Precision Agriculture, Vegetables, Beef, Dairy, Swine, Poultry

    Philip Huang United States, CA, Thousand Oaks

    Interests: Organic Row Crops, Marketing, Agribusiness

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  • Weed Control in Organic Soybean Farms

    By Vijayalaxmi Kinhal

    Updated Oct 24, 2020 

    Experts all agree that there is no silver bullet to control weeds in the organic cultivation of soybeans. Farmers need to use a combination of measures to keep weeds at bay in the short and long term. Soybean vs WeedsWeed control is the main problem in organic agriculture including in soybeans. It is more difficult to control weeds in soybeans because of their compact foliage, which takes longer than grain crops to produce an interlocking canopy that shades inter-row area. On the other hand, weeds have various natural traits that help them spread and establish...

    Categories: Crop Protection, Soybeans, Organic Row Crops

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    7 Ways to Measure Soil Health Improvements

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Mar 7, 2019 

    While there are numerous reasons for using cover crops, a primary one is improving soil health. In fact, it’s the one benefit most farmers using cover crops have experienced: In the most recent Cover Crop Survey Annual Report, of those who rated the statement, “Using cover crops has improved soil health on my farm,” 86% agreed or strongly agreed. The report notes that it’s interesting and heartening that “soil health reflects an embrace of a long-term, hard-to-quantify benefit of cover crops, and that for the past two surveys, it has achieved the top spot by garnering 86% of the responses. ”While soil health may be harder to quantify than benefits like biomass production or input savings, there are ways of measuring how cover crops are making a difference in your soil... In a Penn State Extension article written by soil scientist Sjeord Duiker, he recommends using the penetrometer when the whole profile is at field capacity, which is approximately 24 hours after a soaking rain...

    Categories: Cover Crops

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    How to Time Cover Crop Termination and Get an Effective Burndown

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Jul 1, 2019 

    With May 2018 to April 2019 being the wettest 12-month period on record, according to NOAA, many farmers across the nation were forced to delay planting. In fact, for the first time on record, less than half of corn was planted by May 19, says the USDA. Even by June 2, “both corn and soybean planting were proceeding at a record slow pace. ”For those with cover crops, these wet conditions likely affected their termination plans, causing some to debate whether they should terminate before or after planting... If the season is drier than normal, the NRCS suggests terminating cover crops earlier to conserve moisture, while a wetter-than-normal spring may warrant a later termination to help soak up excess soil moisture and improve seedbed conditions...

    Categories: Cover Crops

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    How Feasible is Organic Corn?

    By Vijayalaxmi Kinhal

    Published Aug 14, 2020 

    Organic corn is both economically viable and technically feasible. Even though organic corn yield is 32% lesser, the prices are double that of conventional corn, guaranteeing attractive returns on investment (ROI) to growers. Moreover, there is growing technical information available to advise organic corn production. Growing Demand for Organic CornThe demand for organic corn is expected to grow globally at a CAGR of 1. 9% and amount to 1170 million USD by 2026...

    Categories: Corn, Organic Row Crops

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    How to Cultivate Cotton Organically

    By Vijayalaxmi Kinhal

    Updated Oct 24, 2020 

    Though most of the organic cotton in the world comes from Asia, Texas in the USA is also a major producer. Although specific growing methods may vary based on region and farm size, there are general principles that can be applied throughout the world when it comes to growing organic cottonEconomicsThere are many reasons to grow cotton organically. The market share of organic cotton has grown from 1% in 2008 to 21% in 2018. Half of this is grown in India, with China (17%), Kyrgyzstan (7%), and Turkey (7%) being the next major producers. It takes three years for farmers to convert to organic farming, as this is the time required for soil to become free of chemical fertilizers and pesticides...

    Categories: Cotton, Organic Specialty Crops, Sustainable Agriculture

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    Precision Farming Solutions for Weeds in Soybean Farms

    By Vijayalaxmi Kinhal

    Updated Sep 10, 2020 

    The weed control measures used in soybean production need to be overhauled. The development of resistance in weeds has made current technology and management increasingly expensive and comes accompanied with heavy yield losses. Precision management solutions can reduce chemical use in several ways. Current Weed Management in SoybeansSoybean is important for the global economy as it is used as a source for oil and protein (for people and livestock) and as biodiesel. Soybean is the crop with the largest monoculture in the world and with 90% of it grown in Argentina, Brazil, the United States, China, and India...

    Categories: Precision Agriculture, Soybeans

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    Best guide for chitosan oligosaccharide in agriculture

    By Darren Chan

    Published May 28, 2019 

    Chitosan oligosaccharide is known as plant vaccines and they are the third type of vaccine after human and animal vaccines. It’s applied in a wide range of crops and application methods are also very flexible. Its important value has been gradually tapped and catch more and more attention. A wealth of compound products has emerged in and will open up a new path for crop nutrition and health... Seed Pretreatment - disease resistance, strong seedlings, increased yieldBy seed dressing, soaking, coating and other methods to treat seeds, it can increase seed germination force, increase seed germination rate and prompt seed emergence with full and strong seedlings, and so on...

    Categories: Agribusiness, Corn, Organic Row Crops

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    How Precision Technology can Tackle Cotton’s Irrigation and Pests’ Challenges in the 2020s

    By Vijayalaxmi Kinhal

    Updated Aug 7, 2020 

    The high-value returns from cotton as well as the higher costs of production should be ample incentives for adopting precision farming. The vagaries of climate change and its disruptions to the normal farm schedule only increases the value of this information technology for cotton. Climate Change is Altering Pest Attack PatternsIncreasing drought and extreme weather due to climate change are impacting cotton in unforeseen ways. The unpredictable changes in weather patterns aren’t just disturbing the environmental conditions needed for cotton crops. Experts noticed since 2019 that the feeding and reproductive patterns of pests have changed...

    Categories: Cotton, Irrigation, Precision Agriculture

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    From rich milk to delectable sauce: Opportunities in the soybean industry

    By SHARATH CHANDRAN U.S

    Updated Aug 9, 2020 

    Who hasn’t heard of the term “soy” or “tofu”? Especially in the vegan community, soy-based foods have become more of a cultural facet than a regular food item. The soybean or soya bean is widely cultivated in several parts of the world. But, Brazil and the US lead the industry with 126 and 124 million tonnes of production respectively (FAOSTAT, 2018) which is roughly 70% of the world's production. In the US, soybeans are the second largest produced crop after corn... Soymilk is made by grinding soaked raw soybeans with water and boiling them to remove anti-nutritional factors...

    Categories: Agribusiness, Soybeans

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    2019 Corn Producer “Scale-In” Hedge Strategy Update

    By Capitol Commodity Hedging Services

    Published Sep 19, 2019 

    May through July offered an excellent opportunity to start our hedge campaign for 2019. In light of the next to impossible early planting conditions throughout the corn belt, the prices somehow, are right back down to the early May lows. Unbelievable! Which is why a proactive approach must be taken by buying puts into rallies each season on a scale-in basis. . We had 3 trigger sell signals this year, see chart below...

    Categories: Corn, Marketing

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  • No Questions Found
  • Posted By Timber Production
    Aug 3, 2017 

    http://agnetwest.com/2017/08/03/good-guy-fungus-oaks-ornamental-crops/
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    Posted By Soybeans
    May 13, 2020 

    https://extension.sdstate.edu/cloroxr-soak-test

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    Posted By Fertility And Soils
    Feb 8, 2019 

    https://e360.yale.edu/digest/scientists-find-way-to-make-oil-soaked-soil-fertile-again

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    Posted By Timber Production
    Jul 3, 2017 

    https://www.nature.com/news/ancient-oak-s-youthful-genome-surprises-biologists-1.22166

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    Posted By Marc Suderman
    Oct 30, 2015 

    A soil program with managed levels of calcium and magnesium will allow the nature of the soil to function complementary to the process of life and in many cases actually diminish or even eliminate the causes of many problems we can’t explain or do much about ourselves. Some of these benefits and effects are:
    1. More efficient photosynthesis.
    2. Maximum use of heat-degree days – a natural time clock of the life system of plants.
    3. Create and maintain root and stem capacities for optimum use of sunlight energy and thermal efficiency by the leaves of the plant.
    4. Thereby the plants can use water, CO2, nitrogen and mineral nutrients with greater efficiency.
    5. A healthy and normal functioning plant can maintain an adequate hormone and enzyme system so vital to resistance to insect and disease hazards.
    6. A balanced soil equilibrium will regulate and manage the quality and availability of all mineral elements needed by growing plants.
    7. Excesses of minerals during the early growth stages often plug up the vessels of the stem and are the frequent cause of early death. A dead plant system cannot mature or ripen itself.
    8. An excess of magnesium as well as nitrogen in the soil initiates the processes which prevent the crop from growing dry and nutritionally ripe which is a major goal of every farmer.
    9. Carbon dioxide availability is more important to high-yield potentials than nitrogen or any mineral element. The supply in the atmosphere could sustain life for not much more than 30 days, and depends on the soil system and its effect on soil structure and tilth, the processes are retarded and inefficient.
    10. Clay soils high in magnesium and low in calcium cement together tightly, are subject to compaction and clodding, crust over easily and prevent the insoak of water and the recovery of capillary water during the dry periods of the season.
    11. Soils in such poor tilth and structure increase the effects of the many weather hazards that annually impair normal plant growth. With a managed calcium-magnesium equilibrium we would not have to lean on the many poor excuses of weather we use every year to explain away our ignorance and personal mistakes to create a more integrated soil management system that would tend to diminish or even eliminate the many variable hazards of the weather.
    pH, then, is a measure of resistance. And pH 7 says there is equal resistance between cations and anions. At pH 7 synchronization has been achieved. pH, technically, is the mathematical symbol for potential of the hydrogen ion. There is a shortfall in the value of this equation because it does not tell the pounds per acre. At pH 7 reading can be had without one single pound of calcium per acre. Pure white sand has a pH 7 reading and there’s not an ounce of calcium in its construction. Such a test presented to the average college classroom would get a “no lime required” opinion.

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    Posted By Willis Jepson
    Dec 14, 2017 


    5 way cover crop mix soaking up some rays on a cold TN day!
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    Posted By Curt Livesay
    Oct 6, 2015 

    Hi guys, sorry it took me so long to respond.  I've been looking for the research on the "carbon penalty," which I think, ironically enough, comes from Iowa State. But I can't seem to find it right now.  Either way, here's the deal: The carbon penalty is real.  When you apply nitrogen, remember that your plants eat at the last table.  So the residue sitting on your fields effectively acts like a sponge to soak up that N. The microbes use it as a food source.  We know all of that.  In fact, Dr. DeAnn Presley from K-State has done some great research on using nitrogen to help break down wheat straw and has seen excellent results.  Why?  Because it works.  So, why would anyone say it doesn't?  Because when we put it on in the fall, if it gets too cold too fast, it is true that the microbes that do that breaking down effectively go dormant. 

     

    BUT, with that said I'm fine with my growers putting on a LITTLE (like a couple gallons of 28 or 32%) on right after harvest if it's still > 45 degrees to help kick start this process.  In the worst case scenario that small of an amount of nitrogen shouldn't cause any appreciable loss as it ties up with the residue, and it's right there as an immediately available food source in the spring.  You WILL pay a carbon penalty, the question is when.  It won't work for everyone in all conditions, but to discount a fall breakdown recipe wholesale is simply asinine.  It's bad science.

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    Agronomic Evaluation of Biochar, Compost and Biochar-Blended Compost across Different Cropping Systems: Perspective from the European Project FERTIPLUS

    Authors: Miguel A. Sánchez-Monedero, María L. Cayuela, María Sánchez-García, Bart Vandecasteele, Tommy D’Hose, Guadalupe López, Carolina Martínez-Gaitán, Peter J. Kuikman, Tania Sinicco and Claudio Mondini

    Journal Title: Agronomy

    ISSN: 2073-4395 (Online)

    Publisher: MDPI AG

    This paper reports the results on the agronomic performance of organic amendments in the EU 7th FP project “FERTIPLUS—reducing mineral fertilizers and agro-chemicals by recycling treated organic waste as compost and bio-char”. Four case studies on field-scale application of biochar, compost and biochar-blended compost were established and studied for three consecutive years in four distinct cropping systems and under different agro-climatic conditions in Europe. These included the following sites: olive groves in Murcia (Spain), greenhouse grown tomatoes in Almeria (Spain), an arable crop rotation in Oost-Vlaanderen (Merelbeke, Belgium), and three vineyards in Friuli Venezia Giulia (Italy). A slow pyrolysis oak biochar was applied, either alone or in combination with organic residues: compost from olive wastes in Murcia (Spain), sheep manure in Almeria (Spain), and compost from biowaste and green waste in Belgium and Italy. The agronomical benefits were evaluated based on different aspects of soil fertility (soil total organic carbon (TOC), pH, nutrient cycling and microbial activity) and crop nutritional status and productivity. All amendments were effective in increasing soil organic C in all the field trials. On average, the increase with respect to the control was about 11% for compost, 20% for biochar-blended compost, and 36% for biochar. The amendments also raised the pH by 0.15–0.50 units in acidic soils. Only biochar had a negligible fertilization effect. On the contrary, compost and biochar-blended compost were effective in enhancing soil fertility by increasing nutrient cycling (25% mean increase in extractable organic C and 44% increase in extractable N), element availability (26% increase in available K), and soil microbial activity (26% increase in soil respiration and 2–4 fold enhancement of denitrifying activity). In general, the tested amendments did not show any negative effect on crop yield and quality. Furthermore, in vineyards and greenhouse grown tomatoes cropping systems, compost and biochar-blended compost were also effective in enhancing key crop quality parameters (9% increase in grape must acidity and 16% increase in weight, 9% increase in diameter and 8% increase in hardness of tomato fruits) important for the quality and marketability of the crops. The overall results of the project suggest that the application of a mixture of biochar and compost can benefit crops. Therefore, biochar-blended compost can support and maintain soil ferti...
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    Posted By Fertility And Soils
    Oct 14, 2019 

    https://www.no-tillfarmer.com/articles/9187-which-farming-practices-help-soils-absorb-heavy-rains
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    Posted By Fertility And Soils
    Dec 25, 2020 

    https://www.agriculture.com/technology/data/soil-health-sabermetrics
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