Advertisement

1805 Results

Search results for 'Plant Pathology'

  • Should You Rotate Your Cover Crops? 4 Issues to Consider

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Jun 15, 2018

    But have you thought about rotating your cover crops? Should you be using the same cover crop species back to back, year after year?Dave Robison, who runs the blog PlantCoverCrops... Photo by Maureen Austin, Ohio State University, Department of Plant Pathology. Their work was focused on extending the grazing season by planting oats, rye and turnips after a cereal grain... ”Michigan State University Extension advises not planting oilseed radish as a cover crop on the same field for more than two years in a row, and avoiding it when growing cabbage, broccoli or radish for cash crops because of its susceptibility to the disease... Problems with cereals? Don’t save seedIf you’ve been saving and replanting seed from your cereal cover crops and you’re seeing diseases in your cover, it’s not the rotation — it’s the seed...

    Categories: Cover Crops

    Pencil Out Fungicide Profitability

    By Amanda Allworth

    Published Jun 20, 2018

    Fungal spores overwinter in soil and plant debris left behind with conservation tillage practices... More leaf coverage means you’ll get better plant protection... Adjuvants can also help products spread and stick on leaf surfaces, resulting in better plant coverage... For example, insecticides can help control pests that are vectors for plant diseases... On the other hand, if you’ve planted more susceptible seed varieties and disease pressure starts early and is heavy, you might see a substantial yield advantage by protecting plant health...

    Categories: Agribusiness, Corn

    Best way to control powdery mildew on grape plant

    By Darren Chan

    Published Oct 22, 2018

    The disease seems as a whitish-gray powdery coating on the leaves or fruit caused by plant mycelium and conidia on the surface of the plant... While this can be common,it’s a disease which will injury your grape plants and your crop if left untreated... Removing morbid leaves and shoots as they seem and removing dead material at the end of the season helps prevent powdery mildew spreading and overwintering on plants... Apply sulfur before symptoms appear, using a product with additional surfactant to assist the sulfur stick to plant surfaces... It also have good effect on building a healthy soil condition for plant growth...

    Categories: Agribusiness, Canola, Organic

    Prevented Planting? Cover Crops Offer a Silver Lining

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Jul 18, 2019

    Wet conditions across the country forced many farmers to forgo their plans for the season and take prevented planting payments instead. The USDA says that as of July 8, 2019, its paid roughly $184 million in claims for prevented planting because of floods and excess moisture... But just because you couldn’t get a cash crop planted doesn’t mean those acres should stay bare until next spring... Why Cover Crop Prevented Plant Acres?“If you have livestock, it’s a total no-brainer,” says Sarah Carlson, Strategic Initiatives Director for Practical Farmers of Iowa, explaining that sorghum-sudangrass or Japanese millet would provide livestock farmers access to a lot of forage for the summer and reduce their feedstock expenses. The USDA’s Risk Management Agency (RMA) is also allowing farmers to hay, graze or chop cover crops on prevented plant acres earlier this year, with final grazing and haying being moved from Nov...

    Categories: Cover Crops

    Best way to control powdery mildew on grape plant 1

    By Darren Chan

    Published Oct 22, 2018

    The disease seems as a whitish-gray powdery coating on the leaves or fruit caused by plant mycelium and conidia on the surface of the plant... While this can be common,it’s a disease which will injury your grape plants and your crop if left untreated... Removing morbid leaves and shoots as they seem and removing dead material at the end of the season helps prevent powdery mildew spreading and overwintering on plants... Apply sulfur before symptoms appear, using a product with additional surfactant to assist the sulfur stick to plant surfaces... It also have good effect on building a healthy soil condition for plant growth...

    Categories: Agribusiness, Canola, Organic

    Advantages of seaweed fertilizer for plants

    By Darren Chan

    Published Dec 31, 2019

    Seaweed fertilizer is an organic fertilizer produced by accurate processing of marine plant seaweed as the primary raw material... Below are the advantages of seaweed fertilizer for plants:1 Nutrient-richThe active seaweed fertilizer contains a large amount of non-nitrogen-containing organic matter, including 40 kinds of minerals such as potassium, calcium, magnesium, iron, zinc, and iodine, and abundant vitamins, which are unmatched by terrestrial plants, especially seaweed polysaccharides unique to seaweeds. Alginic acid, highly unsaturated fatty acids and a variety of natural plant growth regulators can stimulate the production of non-specific active factors in plants and regulate the balance of endogenous elements. 2 Easily absorbed by plantsThe active ingredients in seaweed fertilizers are particularly active after they have been specially treated, and they enter the plants within 2 to 3 hours after application, and they have a speedy absorption and conduction velocity. Alginic acid in seaweed fertilizer can reduce the surface tension of water, forming a layer of film on the surface of the plant, increasing the contact area, water-soluble substances are relatively easy to penetrate the surface cells of stems and leaves so that plants can effectively absorb the nutrients in the seaweed extract...

    Categories: Agribusiness, Specialty/Vegetable

    How to get rid of powdery mildew on plants ?

    By Darren Chan

    Published Aug 31, 2018

    For Agricultural control1. Select resistant varietiesThere is a difference in resistant ability between the varieties of powdery mildew, so first we must select disease-resistant varieties. 2 Improve conditions of Ventilation and transmittanceThe planting density is appropriate, and the old leaves at the bottom are destroyed in time, which is conducive to the light penetration of the fields. Clean the pastoral areas, remove diseased leaves, diseased locusts, and broken twigs, and remove it from the field and concentrate or burn it... Select the right biologicide pesticideAccording to the characteristics of plant growth characteristics and disease occurrence stage, choose the appropriate biological pesticides...

    Categories: Agribusiness, Dairy, Irrigation

    Collin Palmer Canada, Ontario, Ridgetown

    Business Title: Kearney Planters
    Job Title: Supply Chain Manager
    About: For as long as I can remember, I have been around heavy equipment. I started turning wrenches when I was only 12 years old working on light to commercial trucks with my Father. That ability served me well for a couple decades. Now I am responsible for a multi million dollar parts and sales program based at Kearney Planters in Ontario Canada. Follow our progress on Twitter find me @Proud4Ag.
    Interests: Corn, Soybeans, Wheat, Canola, Grain Sorghum, Poultry, Specialty, Cover Crops, Precision Ag, Organic, Irrigation, Marketing, Agribusiness

    Brian Horath United States, IL, Farina

    Interests: Corn, Soybeans, Precision Ag, Irrigation, Marketing

  • Collin Palmer Canada, Ontario, Ridgetown

    Business Title: Kearney Planters
    Job Title: Supply Chain Manager
    About: For as long as I can remember, I have been around heavy equipment. I started turning wrenches when I was only 12 years old working on light to commercial trucks with my Father. That ability served me well for a couple decades. Now I am responsible for a multi million dollar parts and sales program based at Kearney Planters in Ontario Canada. Follow our progress on Twitter find me @Proud4Ag.
    Interests: Corn, Soybeans, Wheat, Canola, Grain Sorghum, Poultry, Specialty, Cover Crops, Precision Ag, Organic, Irrigation, Marketing, Agribusiness

    Brian Horath United States, IL, Farina

    Interests: Corn, Soybeans, Precision Ag, Irrigation, Marketing

    James West

    Interests:

    Dan Ronceray

    Interests:

  • #SoilMatters

    Public
    Soil and everything in it is the focus here. Crop Nutritionists and CCAs know that growing a crop is more than planting, watering and applying fertilizer. It requires testing, planning, monitoring and adjusting the plan as needed.
    Interest: Corn, Wheat, Specialty/Vegetable, Specialty, Cover Crops, Ag Issues in Washington, Precision Ag, Organic, Irrigation, Agribusiness

  • Should You Rotate Your Cover Crops? 4 Issues to Consider

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Jun 15, 2018

    But have you thought about rotating your cover crops? Should you be using the same cover crop species back to back, year after year?Dave Robison, who runs the blog PlantCoverCrops... Photo by Maureen Austin, Ohio State University, Department of Plant Pathology. Their work was focused on extending the grazing season by planting oats, rye and turnips after a cereal grain... ”Michigan State University Extension advises not planting oilseed radish as a cover crop on the same field for more than two years in a row, and avoiding it when growing cabbage, broccoli or radish for cash crops because of its susceptibility to the disease... Problems with cereals? Don’t save seedIf you’ve been saving and replanting seed from your cereal cover crops and you’re seeing diseases in your cover, it’s not the rotation — it’s the seed...

    Categories: Cover Crops

    Pencil Out Fungicide Profitability

    By Amanda Allworth

    Published Jun 20, 2018

    Fungal spores overwinter in soil and plant debris left behind with conservation tillage practices... More leaf coverage means you’ll get better plant protection... Adjuvants can also help products spread and stick on leaf surfaces, resulting in better plant coverage... For example, insecticides can help control pests that are vectors for plant diseases... On the other hand, if you’ve planted more susceptible seed varieties and disease pressure starts early and is heavy, you might see a substantial yield advantage by protecting plant health...

    Categories: Agribusiness, Corn

    Best way to control powdery mildew on grape plant

    By Darren Chan

    Published Oct 22, 2018

    The disease seems as a whitish-gray powdery coating on the leaves or fruit caused by plant mycelium and conidia on the surface of the plant... While this can be common,it’s a disease which will injury your grape plants and your crop if left untreated... Removing morbid leaves and shoots as they seem and removing dead material at the end of the season helps prevent powdery mildew spreading and overwintering on plants... Apply sulfur before symptoms appear, using a product with additional surfactant to assist the sulfur stick to plant surfaces... It also have good effect on building a healthy soil condition for plant growth...

    Categories: Agribusiness, Canola, Organic

    Prevented Planting? Cover Crops Offer a Silver Lining

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Jul 18, 2019

    Wet conditions across the country forced many farmers to forgo their plans for the season and take prevented planting payments instead. The USDA says that as of July 8, 2019, its paid roughly $184 million in claims for prevented planting because of floods and excess moisture... But just because you couldn’t get a cash crop planted doesn’t mean those acres should stay bare until next spring... Why Cover Crop Prevented Plant Acres?“If you have livestock, it’s a total no-brainer,” says Sarah Carlson, Strategic Initiatives Director for Practical Farmers of Iowa, explaining that sorghum-sudangrass or Japanese millet would provide livestock farmers access to a lot of forage for the summer and reduce their feedstock expenses. The USDA’s Risk Management Agency (RMA) is also allowing farmers to hay, graze or chop cover crops on prevented plant acres earlier this year, with final grazing and haying being moved from Nov...

    Categories: Cover Crops

    Best way to control powdery mildew on grape plant 1

    By Darren Chan

    Published Oct 22, 2018

    The disease seems as a whitish-gray powdery coating on the leaves or fruit caused by plant mycelium and conidia on the surface of the plant... While this can be common,it’s a disease which will injury your grape plants and your crop if left untreated... Removing morbid leaves and shoots as they seem and removing dead material at the end of the season helps prevent powdery mildew spreading and overwintering on plants... Apply sulfur before symptoms appear, using a product with additional surfactant to assist the sulfur stick to plant surfaces... It also have good effect on building a healthy soil condition for plant growth...

    Categories: Agribusiness, Canola, Organic

    Advantages of seaweed fertilizer for plants

    By Darren Chan

    Published Dec 31, 2019

    Seaweed fertilizer is an organic fertilizer produced by accurate processing of marine plant seaweed as the primary raw material... Below are the advantages of seaweed fertilizer for plants:1 Nutrient-richThe active seaweed fertilizer contains a large amount of non-nitrogen-containing organic matter, including 40 kinds of minerals such as potassium, calcium, magnesium, iron, zinc, and iodine, and abundant vitamins, which are unmatched by terrestrial plants, especially seaweed polysaccharides unique to seaweeds. Alginic acid, highly unsaturated fatty acids and a variety of natural plant growth regulators can stimulate the production of non-specific active factors in plants and regulate the balance of endogenous elements. 2 Easily absorbed by plantsThe active ingredients in seaweed fertilizers are particularly active after they have been specially treated, and they enter the plants within 2 to 3 hours after application, and they have a speedy absorption and conduction velocity. Alginic acid in seaweed fertilizer can reduce the surface tension of water, forming a layer of film on the surface of the plant, increasing the contact area, water-soluble substances are relatively easy to penetrate the surface cells of stems and leaves so that plants can effectively absorb the nutrients in the seaweed extract...

    Categories: Agribusiness, Specialty/Vegetable

    How to get rid of powdery mildew on plants ?

    By Darren Chan

    Published Aug 31, 2018

    For Agricultural control1. Select resistant varietiesThere is a difference in resistant ability between the varieties of powdery mildew, so first we must select disease-resistant varieties. 2 Improve conditions of Ventilation and transmittanceThe planting density is appropriate, and the old leaves at the bottom are destroyed in time, which is conducive to the light penetration of the fields. Clean the pastoral areas, remove diseased leaves, diseased locusts, and broken twigs, and remove it from the field and concentrate or burn it... Select the right biologicide pesticideAccording to the characteristics of plant growth characteristics and disease occurrence stage, choose the appropriate biological pesticides...

    Categories: Agribusiness, Dairy, Irrigation

    4 Steps to Building Soil Organic Matter in the South

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Jul 18, 2018

    As we learn more about what goes on in the world beneath our feet, increased attention has been placed on soil organic matter... He knows one farmer who decided to grow a mix of sorghum sudangrass, sunn hemp, daikon radish, sunflower and cowpeas right after his corn crop, before planting winter wheat... “Up to 40% of any kind of plant is carbon going into the soil in the form of root exudates... , identifies 66 different crop species by these classifications, as well as growth cycle, relative water use, plant architecture, seeding depth, forage quality, pollination characteristics and nutrient cycling... In other words, do you have critter holes, do you have root holes? Does your soil surface look like cottage cheese? Do you have breaks in the soil? Do you have pore space where air and water can move thoroughly? When you have soil structure, which is developed through growing plants and adhering to these principles, that is when you can see things really take off...

    Categories: Cover Crops

    Top 5 Reasons Why Black Oats Are The Best Beginner's Cover Crop

    By Cover Crops

    Published Sep 14, 2018

    They're easy to plant. Black oats have a fairly wide window of planting opportunity compared to other covers. Here in SC, we begin seeding ours behind corn in the middle of August and will plant them up until the end of November. Of course, the warmer weather promotes tillering so our seeding rate starts around 2 bushels per acre (when planted by itself) and trends up to around 3 bushels per acre by the end of November. They can be planted a number of ways, from drilling to broadcasting (with light incorporation)...

    Categories: Cover Crops

    What Farmers Need to Know About Mycorrhizae

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Nov 2, 2018

    If someone asked you, “How do plants take up the water and nutrients they need?” you’d probably tell them through the roots. But did you know that for many crops, those roots aren’t working alone?That’s because most plant species associate with mycorrhizal fungi. What is mycorrhizal fungi? University of Alberta biological scientist JC Cahill says that mycorrhizas are actually the interaction between a fungus and a plant. Although there are many different types of mycorrhizae, the only one crop farmers need to be concerned about is arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), as 65% of plant species associate with it... The way AMF works, Cahill explains, is that they grow inside the plant’s roots, and in exchange for sugar from the plant, the hyphae — the threadlike filaments of the fungi — capture water and nutrients in the soil for the plant...

    Categories: Cover Crops

  • Posted By Monica Pape
    Sep 27, 2018

    The easiest remedy is to pull it and keep an eye on the rest of the field. Is this the only plant affected? Are there any patterns developing in other plants or parts of the field? At first, I thought possibly a bacterial/fungal issue. However, insect issues can end up looking like nutritional deficiencies, which both may be a possibility. Without pulling the plant looking at the roots, looking at the rest of the field, and asking some more questions you're taking an educated guess at best. If it is becoming a more widespread issue you may want to send a sample to a plant pathology lab like the University of Kentucky.

    Posted By Soybeans
    Jun 6, 2018

    https://agfax.com/2018/06/04/soybeans-new-app-helps-manage-white-mold-podcast/

    Posted By Farmers Under Forty
    Jun 24, 2019

    https://www.mississippi-crops.com/2019/06/18/the-principles-of-plant-pathology-the-response-of-the-host/

    Posted By Wheat Producers
    Jul 25, 2018

    https://osuwheat.com/2018/07/23/disease-and-insect-considerations-to-make-before-planting-wheat-this-fall-2/

    Posted By Wheat Producers
    Aug 24, 2017

    https://osuwheat.com/2017/08/18/disease-and-insect-considerations-to-make-before-planting-wheat-this-fall/

    Posted By Canola Growers
    Feb 22, 2017

    "'When we did our survey in 2016, we found blackleg in almost 90 percent of the fields we looked at,' said Mike Harding, research scientist in plant pathology with Alberta Agriculture and Forestry. 'If we looked harder, we probably could have found it in just about all of them.'"
    http://www.albertafarmexpress.ca/2017/02/06/youve-got-blackleg-in-your-canola-fields-whether-you-know-it-or-not

    Post main image

    Posted By Wheat Producers
    Jul 25, 2015


    http://plantpathology.ces.ncsu.edu/don-vomitoxin-in-small-grains/

    Posted By Monica Pape
    Sep 30, 2018

    1. Harvest what you can, if at all possible
    2. Clear field of all debris, especially any affected plant material including weeds
    3. Send a sample to a pathology lab to confirm whether bacterial or fungal. I’m leaning toward fungal, anthracnosis, however, a positive identification is better than my gut feeling. With a positive id, you can then decide what, if any bactericide or fungicide would be most effective or even cost effective at this point. You won't necessarily see a pest that might be potentially causing problems. Sometimes going out at night with a flashlight you are able to catch them in the act.
    4. If you haven’t had a soil test done, do it now and see where the pH is. Sometimes a pH adjustment can go a long way in complementing cultural practices and treatments that need to be done as well. It has been shown that liming can inhibit spore development. You still need to know the pH to determine a source, rate, and if it is even an option. If you're sending a soil test out include pH, OM, CEC, macros, micros, and if possible base saturation. Might as well get it all at one time.
    5. You may need to rotate out of potatoes and cabbage. Maybe for several years. Or invest in treated seed or field transplants that have been fumigated.
    6. I’d also suggest cover cropping with something like oats or rye. Oats have been shown to sequester toxins in animals. I don’t have any scientific proof of their remedial capabilities in soils. I really wish I did though. Normally I would suggest mustard. However, I’m not sure what the efficacy would be in this case. It’s just a consideration at this point. I still think your best bet is pH, looking at drainage issues, rotating, and using disease-resistant/treated varieties.
    7. Usually, bacterial/fungal issues are exacerbated by wetter than normal seasons and poor drainage. If drainage is an ongoing issue you may need to look at taking steps to alleviate it such as tiling or amending. Map/note where drainage issues are and affected plants are
    8. There is a lot of good info. at Cornell's website about bactericides/fungicides regarding efficacy, rates, etc.
    9. My gut could be wrong a lab diagnosis is more definitive than my gut and catch-all terms.
    10. If you have more questions, don't hesitate to email me at theaccidentalagronomist@gmail.com. I respond quicker to emails.

    Posted By Laura Barrera
    Nov 2, 2018

    https://agfuse.com/article/what-farmers-need-to-know-about-mycorrhizae

    Posted By Laura Barrera
    Jun 1, 2018

    https://agfuse.com/article/how-yield-champions-use-cover-crops-for-growing-higher-bushels