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Search results for 'Rye'

  • Thomos Grye

    Interests:

    How to Protect Corn Yields Following Cereal Rye

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Apr 19

    If you’ve considered using cereal rye as a cover crop in front of corn, you’ve probably been warned that your yield would suffer... Research has shown that corn yields can take a hit after cereal rye, but it doesn’t happen every time... Pathogens at PlayOne of the reasons corn may suffer after cereal rye is if the rye is serving as a “green bridge,” where pathogens that were infecting the rye move onto the growing corn as the rye dies... In a 2018 Iowa Learning Farms (ILF) webinar, she explained that researchers first confirmed that rye can host several pathogens, including:Fusarium graminearum — which causes several diseases, including stalk rot and ear rot of corn, head scab of wheat, etc. Pythium sylvaticum — which causes corn and soybean seedling diseaseA field experiment funded by the Iowa Nutrient Research Center was conducted in 2014 and 2015 to determine whether the rye could serve as a green bridge in transferring those pathogens to corn...

    Categories: Corn, Cover Crops

    Grain Dryer

    Public
    Grain Dryer & Grain Drying Technology
    Interest: Corn, Cotton, Peanuts, Soybeans, Wheat, Specialty/Vegetable, Rice, Canola, Grain Sorghum, Poultry, Cover Crops, Marketing, Agribusiness

    SUNCUE Grain Dryer Taiwan, Taiwan, Taichung

    Business Title: SUNCUE
    Job Title: Grain Drying Consultant
    About: SUNCUE has been continuously inventing pioneered drying technology over the past 50 years. Pursuing lowest drying cost, producing highest quality grain, providing greatest benefit to farmers.
    Interests: Corn, Peanuts, Soybeans, Rice, Canola, Grain Sorghum, Poultry, Organic, Marketing, Agribusiness

    Nery Earnhart United States, Indiana, Kimmell

    Interests: Corn, Soybeans

    Jonathan Dyer

    Interests:

    What Farmers Need to Know About Mycorrhizae

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Nov 2, 2018

    If someone asked you, “How do plants take up the water and nutrients they need?” you’d probably tell them through the roots. But did you know that for many crops, those roots aren’t working alone?That’s because most plant species associate with mycorrhizal fungi. What is mycorrhizal fungi? University of Alberta biological scientist JC Cahill says that mycorrhizas are actually the interaction between a fungus and a plant. Although there are many different types of mycorrhizae, the only one crop farmers need to be concerned about is arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), as 65% of plant species associate with it... Grasses like sorghums, millets, rye, triticale, barley — and oats in particular — are also excellent colonizers...

    Categories: Cover Crops

    Top 5 Reasons Why Black Oats Are The Best Beginner's Cover Crop

    By Cover Crops

    Published Sep 14, 2018

    Black oats' C-to-N ratio is lower than that of cereal rye but has similar biomass tonnage. What does this mean? The lower C-to-N ratio will allow the black oats to break down quicker than cereal rye, returning valuable nutrients and organic particles back into your dirt that can be used by the crop immediately following the cover crops... I like cereal rye as a cover crop, too. But, one of the biggest problems farmers have with cereal rye cover crops is the speed at which they can get away from you... They're super easy to grow for seed and yield much more than cereal rye and wheat do...

    Categories: Cover Crops

  • Thomos Grye

    Interests:

    SUNCUE Grain Dryer Taiwan, Taiwan, Taichung

    Business Title: SUNCUE
    Job Title: Grain Drying Consultant
    About: SUNCUE has been continuously inventing pioneered drying technology over the past 50 years. Pursuing lowest drying cost, producing highest quality grain, providing greatest benefit to farmers.
    Interests: Corn, Peanuts, Soybeans, Rice, Canola, Grain Sorghum, Poultry, Organic, Marketing, Agribusiness

    Nery Earnhart United States, Indiana, Kimmell

    Interests: Corn, Soybeans

    Jonathan Dyer

    Interests:

    Fffgfggh Umedshoev Canada, Nunavut, Iqaluit

    Business Title: Scratch And Dent Near Me
    About: Https://solocenter.com/
    Interests: Agribusiness

    Jay Brandt United States, OH, Carroll

    About: Farm 1000 acres corn, beans, cereal rye with my father 100% no-till. Co-owner of Walnut Creek Seeds (cover crop and organic corn and beans) with my wife and father.
    Interests: Corn, Soybeans, Wheat, Beef Cattle, Poultry, Hogs, Cover Crops, Precision Ag, Organic, Marketing, Agribusiness, Cereal Rye

  • Grain Dryer

    Public
    Grain Dryer & Grain Drying Technology
    Interest: Corn, Cotton, Peanuts, Soybeans, Wheat, Specialty/Vegetable, Rice, Canola, Grain Sorghum, Poultry, Cover Crops, Marketing, Agribusiness

  • How to Protect Corn Yields Following Cereal Rye

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Apr 19

    If you’ve considered using cereal rye as a cover crop in front of corn, you’ve probably been warned that your yield would suffer... Research has shown that corn yields can take a hit after cereal rye, but it doesn’t happen every time... Pathogens at PlayOne of the reasons corn may suffer after cereal rye is if the rye is serving as a “green bridge,” where pathogens that were infecting the rye move onto the growing corn as the rye dies... In a 2018 Iowa Learning Farms (ILF) webinar, she explained that researchers first confirmed that rye can host several pathogens, including:Fusarium graminearum — which causes several diseases, including stalk rot and ear rot of corn, head scab of wheat, etc. Pythium sylvaticum — which causes corn and soybean seedling diseaseA field experiment funded by the Iowa Nutrient Research Center was conducted in 2014 and 2015 to determine whether the rye could serve as a green bridge in transferring those pathogens to corn...

    Categories: Corn, Cover Crops

    What Farmers Need to Know About Mycorrhizae

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Nov 2, 2018

    If someone asked you, “How do plants take up the water and nutrients they need?” you’d probably tell them through the roots. But did you know that for many crops, those roots aren’t working alone?That’s because most plant species associate with mycorrhizal fungi. What is mycorrhizal fungi? University of Alberta biological scientist JC Cahill says that mycorrhizas are actually the interaction between a fungus and a plant. Although there are many different types of mycorrhizae, the only one crop farmers need to be concerned about is arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), as 65% of plant species associate with it... Grasses like sorghums, millets, rye, triticale, barley — and oats in particular — are also excellent colonizers...

    Categories: Cover Crops

    Top 5 Reasons Why Black Oats Are The Best Beginner's Cover Crop

    By Cover Crops

    Published Sep 14, 2018

    Black oats' C-to-N ratio is lower than that of cereal rye but has similar biomass tonnage. What does this mean? The lower C-to-N ratio will allow the black oats to break down quicker than cereal rye, returning valuable nutrients and organic particles back into your dirt that can be used by the crop immediately following the cover crops... I like cereal rye as a cover crop, too. But, one of the biggest problems farmers have with cereal rye cover crops is the speed at which they can get away from you... They're super easy to grow for seed and yield much more than cereal rye and wheat do...

    Categories: Cover Crops

    How Yield Champions Use Cover Crops for Growing Higher Bushels

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Jun 1, 2018

    There are many factors that can influence corn yield. In fact, Fred Below, a plant physiologist at the University of Illinois, identified seven of them, which he dubbed the “Seven Wonders of the Corn Yield World. ”The seven wonders, ranked in order of most influence on yield, are:WeatherNitrogenHybridPrevious cropPlant populationTillageGrowth regulatorsWhile Below was referring to the cash crop rotation in the fourth wonder, some farmers are taking it one step further by seeding cover crops. The benefit of added crop diversity along with improvements to soil health is paying off, as some of these farmers are achieving the highest yields in the country... After the previous corn was harvested, the owner of JRH Grains LLC drilled a 7-way blend of cereal rye, triticale, oats, crimson clover, Austrian winter peas, hairy vetch and Dwarf essex rape...

    Should You Rotate Your Cover Crops? 4 Issues to Consider

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Jun 15, 2018

    Their work was focused on extending the grazing season by planting oats, rye and turnips after a cereal grain... Robison saw this first hand recently with some farmers who had been saving the seed from their cereal rye cover crops and replanting them for four or five years... Ergot on rye... This can be an issue for cereal grain farmers using annual ryegrass as a cover crop, where having a few escapes is not unheard of. “If we have a few escapes of annual ryegrass and a few years later we’re planting wheat in that field, we’re not really thinking annual ryegrass is a problem because we go in and spray everything out,” Robison says...

    Categories: Cover Crops

    Application of Chitosan oligosaccharide in agriculture

    By Darren Chan

    Published Sep 29, 2018

    Chitosan oligosaccharide is a low-molecular-weight product obtained by degradation of chitosan by lactate which has outstanding water-solubility and high biological activity, thus it can be easily absorbed and utilized by crops. Chitosan oligosaccharide is new green solution to control plant diseases,What’s advantages of Dora Chitosan oligosaccharide1. Increase seed germinationIt has the good effect on seed germination,after we applying on rye grass seed,its germination index increased 33. 5% and vitality index increased 59. 5%...

    Categories: Specialty/Vegetable

    How to Use the SmartMix Calculator to Create the Perfect Cover Crop Mix

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Sep 5

    When it comes to creating a cover crop mix, the options are endless. You need to determine what kind of species you’ll use, how many you’ll use, and at what seeding rates. For anyone new to cover crop blends, these decisions can be overwhelming. Fortunately, there are several free tools available today that can guide both new and experienced cover crop users through the process of developing their own mix... “We need to know what you want to do so we can know whether to use wheat or rye or triticale or oats, because each one may have strengths and weaknesses when it comes to those different goals...

    Categories: Cover Crops

    Can You Use Legume Cover Crops in Your Peanut Rotation?

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Aug 31, 2018

    ”Instead, Balkcom recommends farmers use grasses before peanuts, particularly cereal rye... The seven cover crops were:Common vetch (legume)Hairy vetch (legume)White clover (legume)Red clover (legume)Triticale (grass)Wheat (grass)Rye (grass)While there were no significant differences between the two years in the uninfested field, on the infested field, grasses significantly reduced nematode populations and had significantly higher yields than the legume cover crops... Phatak, professor emeritus of horticulture at the University of Georgia, also shared in the SARE publication that the research staff successfully raised peanuts no-tilled into cereal rye for 6 years without fungicides... Plant a cover crop of rye, crimson clover, cahaba vetch or subterranean clover... Year 2Fall: Replant cereal rye or cahaba vetch, allow crimson or subclover hard seed to germinate...

    Categories: Cover Crops, Peanuts

    Grasses like cereal rye are a good species for beginning cover crop users as they grow fast and have fibrous roots. Photo by Stephen Ausmus, USDA Agricultural Research Service.

    Early Cover Crop Benefits: What Can You Expect in the First Year?

    By Laura Barrera

    Published May 17, 2018

    In 1995, Pennsylvania farmer Steve Groff was speaking at an event when he asked the audience the question: Do cover crops pay off?His thinking at the time was that he had been no-tilling since 1982, and maybe if he no-tilled long enough, he wouldn’t need them. Ray Weil, a soil ecologist with the University of Maryland, happened to hear his question and approached Groff about doing a cover crop study on his farm... Best cover crops to begin withFor farmers who are hoping for benefits from the get-go, Kladivko says grasses like cereal rye, wheat or barley, are good ones to start with because they grow faster and have fibrous roots... For growers looking for some additional weed control, Groff says that cereal rye before soybeans is a good fit. In fact, the Cover Crop Survey Report specifically asked respondents about their experience with cereal rye on herbicide-resistant weed control, and 25% said they always see improved control following cereal rye and 44% reporting “sometimes...

    Categories: Cover Crops

    How Brazilian Big Agriculture is Destroying the Brazilian Amazon

    By Maria Dampman

    Published Apr 4, 2018

    The rampant deforestation of the Amazon began in the 1970s when the government of Brazil determined they needed to build over 9,000 miles of roads help integrate the rainforest with the populated bordering areas. As the deeper parts of the rainforest became accessible, development of these lands became possible, and once begun, continued at an alarming rate. Farmers, loggers and cattle ranchers cleared forest to create grazing land as well as to grow highly profitable crops like soy. In the beginning, no one was aware of the disastrous environmental consequences of destroying the forest often described as “the lungs of the Earth... Climate change has created a dryer than usual environment and lower than average amounts of rainfall creating a perfect storm for massive wildfires to engulf the region...

  • Posted By Maria Dampman
    Apr 4, 2018

    https://agfuse.com/article/how-brazilian-big-agriculture-is-destroying-the-brazilian-amazon

    Posted By Cover Crops
    May 18, 2018

    https://agfuse.com/article/early-cover-crop-benefits-what-can-you-expect-in-the-first-year-

    Posted By Justin Ramer
    May 10, 2018

    Beans popping through after overnight rain shower nestled in between the cereal rye

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    Posted By Caleb Wolters
    May 12, 2018

    Corn growing in rye cover #dontfarmnaked

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    Posted By Laura Barrera
    May 17, 2018

    https://agfuse.com/article/early-cover-crop-benefits-what-can-you-expect-in-the-first-year-

    Posted By Cover Crops
    Feb 20

    https://www.kygrains.info/blog/2019/2/5/as-a-cover-crop-how-does-wheat-compare-to-cereal-rye

    Posted By Corn Growers Group
    Jun 19, 2018

    https://www.agprofessional.com/article/consider-farm-dryers-reduce-post-harvest-loss

    Posted By Cover Crops
    Jun 11, 2018

    https://www.agweek.com/business/agriculture/4457908-cereal-rye-cover-crop-enough

    Posted By Justin Ramer
    May 10, 2018

    Almost waist high cereal rye with beans popping through. Still green!

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    Posted By Grain Dryer
    Mar 28

    The benefits of the drying process

    Risk-free storage
    Grain dryers quickly reduce the moisture content of the freshly harvested grain to safe levels and allow for its long-term storage. 

    Flexibility for the farmer
    Farmers are free to decide when to carry out drying whatever the weather conditions and to sell the grain when the market price is most favourable, generally months after threshing. 

    Increased value
    As well as drying the grain, the dryer removes the impurities collected in the field. This improves the quality of the end product and therefore its market value. 

    Return on the investment
    Purchasing a dryer requires a relatively modest financial commitment and the value of the used machine remains high over the years, thereby guaranteeing an excellent return on the investment.

    Standing by farmers is our commitment at a worldwide level, which also, and especially, means taking care of the whole planet and making decisions focusing on environmental sustainability.

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