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Search results for 'Saint Paul'

  • Paul Burger United States, Iowa, Des Moines

    Interests: Corn, Cotton, Soybeans, Wheat, Precision Ag, Marketing, Agribusiness

    Paul Damba United States, AK, Akiachak

    Interests: Cover Crops, Ag Issues in Washington

    Paulo Villela Brazil, Minas Gerais, Juiz de Fora

    Interests: Specialty/Vegetable, Organic, Urban Agriculture

    Paul Saucier United States, SC, Isle of Palms

    Interests: Specialty/Vegetable, Ag Issues in Washington, Organic, Agribusiness

    Nick Paulin New Zealand, Otago, Queenstown

    Business Title: Peregrine Wines
    Job Title: Viticulturist
    Interests: Specialty/Vegetable, Beef Cattle, Cover Crops, Organic, Irrigation, Agribusiness

    Paul Smyth United States, HI, Honolulu

    Interests: Corn, Specialty/Vegetable, Rice, Canola, Cover Crops, Organic

    Cary Paul United States, IL, Brighton

    Business Title: FamilyFarms Group
    Job Title: Sr Management Consultant
    Interests: Corn, Soybeans, Hogs, Ag Issues in Washington, Precision Ag, Marketing, Agribusiness

  • Paul Burger United States, Iowa, Des Moines

    Interests: Corn, Cotton, Soybeans, Wheat, Precision Ag, Marketing, Agribusiness

    Paul Damba United States, AK, Akiachak

    Interests: Cover Crops, Ag Issues in Washington

    Paulo Villela Brazil, Minas Gerais, Juiz de Fora

    Interests: Specialty/Vegetable, Organic, Urban Agriculture

    Paul Saucier United States, SC, Isle of Palms

    Interests: Specialty/Vegetable, Ag Issues in Washington, Organic, Agribusiness

    Nick Paulin New Zealand, Otago, Queenstown

    Business Title: Peregrine Wines
    Job Title: Viticulturist
    Interests: Specialty/Vegetable, Beef Cattle, Cover Crops, Organic, Irrigation, Agribusiness

    Paul Smyth United States, HI, Honolulu

    Interests: Corn, Specialty/Vegetable, Rice, Canola, Cover Crops, Organic

    Cary Paul United States, IL, Brighton

    Business Title: FamilyFarms Group
    Job Title: Sr Management Consultant
    Interests: Corn, Soybeans, Hogs, Ag Issues in Washington, Precision Ag, Marketing, Agribusiness

  • No Groups Found
  • Nutrient Stratification Not a Problem in No-Till

    By Laura Barrera

    Published 5 months ago

    A common concern growers may have when they move to a no-till system is nutrient stratification. Without tillage to mix fertilizer into the soil, no-tillers may wonder whether the nutrients applied to the soil surface are reaching the crop roots. According to University of Nebraska Extension engineer Paul Jasa and Ray Ward, plant scientist and founder of Ward Laboratories in Kearney, Neb... Table from Paul Jasa, University of Nebraska Extension“If phosphorus stratification were a problem, putting it deeper should’ve given you a bigger yield,” he explains... Table from Paul Jasa, University of Nebraska Extension“That’s because the residue was not disturbed and the fertilizer was right there, so it ran down into the soil and the roots picked it up,” he says...

    How Brazilian Big Agriculture is Destroying the Brazilian Amazon

    By Maria Dampman

    Published 10 months ago

    The rampant deforestation of the Amazon began in the 1970s when the government of Brazil determined they needed to build over 9,000 miles of roads help integrate the rainforest with the populated bordering areas. As the deeper parts of the rainforest became accessible, development of these lands became possible, and once begun, continued at an alarming rate. Farmers, loggers and cattle ranchers cleared forest to create grazing land as well as to grow highly profitable crops like soy. In the beginning, no one was aware of the disastrous environmental consequences of destroying the forest often described as “the lungs of the Earth... Paulo Artaxo, a climatologist at the Brazilian Academy of Sciences, said in an interview with New Scientist that there have been extensive cuts in Brazil’s Ministry of Environment budget and in science research budgets...

    Pencil Out Fungicide Profitability

    By Amanda Allworth

    Published 7 months ago

    Will it pay to apply a fungicide? That’s the million-dollar question for farmers looking to boost production on a limited budget. The honest answer is, it depends. At a time when every input dollar matters, here are some tips to help maximize your profitability on fungicide applications. Your RiskEach year brings different environmental conditions, which is why most fungicide sales are made in-season... Paul, L...

    Categories: Agribusiness, Corn

  • Posted By Laura Barrera
    5 months ago

    https://agfuse.com/article/nutrient-stratification-not-a-problem-in-no-till

    Posted By Maria Dampman
    10 months ago

    https://agfuse.com/article/how-brazilian-big-agriculture-is-destroying-the-brazilian-amazon

    Posted By Fertility And Soils
    5 months ago

    https://agfuse.com/article/nutrient-stratification-not-a-problem-in-no-till

    Posted By Soybeans
    4 months ago

    https://soybeans.ces.ncsu.edu/2018/09/understanding-grain-bin-hazards/
    https://farmdocdaily.illinois.edu/2019/01/plc-base-yield-updates-the-importance-of-crop-rotation.html

    Posted By Fertility And Soils
    4 weeks ago

    https://agfuse.com/article/nutrient-stratification-not-a-problem-in-no-till

    Posted By Farm Finance and Management
    1 month ago

    https://farmdocdaily.illinois.edu/2018/12/protection-provided-by-price-loss-coverage.html
    The Applications of Remote Sensing in Plant Health

    Authors: D'onghia Anna Maria, Brown Paul, Riccioni Luca, Vaglio Laurin Gaia, Beck Pieter S.A., Santoro Franco

    Publisher: Zenodo

    Remote sensing is the science of gathering data on an object/area without making physical contact. Aircraft, satellite and drone-based cameras and sensors are used to measure reflected and/or emitted electromagnetic radiation. This information, often captured as images, can then be analysed to extract additional, valuable data which can be mirrored in a GIS environment for spatial mapping. In the last decade great progress has been achieved in the use of remote sensing for the detection and mapping of several pests and relative host species at territorial basis. However, much research on this subject is still ongoing, but few applications have been made in plant health programmes due to some gaps that need to be identified and addressed.

    The project aimed to bring together experts from research organisations and companies to share knowledge on remote sensing applications in the plant health sector. The partners were interested in:

    State of the art, research needs and gaps on remote sensing methodologies in plant health, including the use of GIS and IT tools.
    Advancements of research for the qualitative and quantitative identification of host plant species by remote sensing over larger areas.
    Advancements of research on remote sensing applications for the identification of specific pests over larger areas.

    Illustration Photo: Multiple-Rotor Remote Sensing Aerial Copter (credits: University of Arkansas Division of Agriculture photo by Mary Hightower / Flickr Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC 2.0))

    Check more https://adalidda.com/posts/jDdL4sDBFBfzyiWo3/the-applications-of-remote-sensing-in-plant-health

    Posted By Kosona Chriv
    3 months ago

    Management of Plant Growth Regulators in Cotton Using Active Crop Canopy Sensors

    Authors: Rodrigo Gonçalves Trevisan, Natanael Santana Vilanova Júnior, Mateus Tonini Eitelwein and José Paulo Molin

    Journal: Agriculture 2018, 8(7), 101

    Publisher: MDPI

    Factors affecting cotton development present spatial and temporal variability. Plant growth regulators (PGR) are used to control vegetative growth, promote higher yields, better fiber quality, and facilitate mechanical harvest. The optimal rate of PGR application depends on crop height, biomass, and growth rate. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate optical and ultrasonic crop canopy sensors to detect the crop spatial variability in cotton fields, and to develop strategies for using this information to perform variable rate application (VRA) of PGR in cotton. Field trials were conducted in Midwest Brazil during the 2013/2014 and 2014/2015 crop seasons. Two optical and two ultrasonic active crop canopy sensors were evaluated as tools to detect crop variability. On-farm trials were used to develop and validate algorithms for VRA based on within-field variations in crop response to PGR applications. The overall performance of the sensors to predict crop height and the accumulation of biomass in cotton was satisfactory. Short distance variability was predominant in some fields, reducing the performance of the sensors while making current technology for variable rate application of PGR inadequate. In areas with large scale variability, the VRA led to 17% savings in PGR products and no significant effect on yield was observed. Ultrasonic sensors present can be a low-cost alternative to implement variable rate application of PGR in real time.

    Photo: Variable rate application of plant growth regulator in narrow-row cotton using an electronic flow controller. (credits: Rodrigo Gonçalves Trevisan, Natanael Santana Vilanova Júnior, Mateus Tonini Eitelwein and José Paulo Molin)

    Check more https://adalidda.com/posts/QbxTtamjQNznqHMDi/management-of-plant-growth-regulators-in-cotton-using-active

    Posted By Wheat Producers
    3 months ago

    http://ocj.com/2018/10/soybean-aphids-and-barley-yellow-dwarf-in-wheat/