Advertisement

8 Results

Search results for 'Shirley'

  • Shirley Lew United States, CA, Los Angeles

    Interests: Cover Crops, Organic Row Crops

    Shirley Xu United States, California, Alameda

    Interests: Cover Crops, Precision Agriculture, Organic Row Crops, Irrigation, Marketing

    Sheldon Shirley Jamaica, Parish of Saint Catherine, Spanish Town

    Interests: Corn, Cotton, Peanuts, Soybeans, Wheat, Vegetables, Rice, Canola, Sorghum

    Creative Biogene United States, NY, Shirley

    Business Title: Creative Biogene
    Job Title: Other Ag Professional, microbiology agriculture
    Interests: Swine

    Isla Miller United States, NY, Shirley

    Business Title: Lifeasible
    Job Title: Other Ag Professional, Marketing
    Interests: Marketing

  • Shirley Lew United States, CA, Los Angeles

    Interests: Cover Crops, Organic Row Crops

    Shirley Xu United States, California, Alameda

    Interests: Cover Crops, Precision Agriculture, Organic Row Crops, Irrigation, Marketing

    Sheldon Shirley Jamaica, Parish of Saint Catherine, Spanish Town

    Interests: Corn, Cotton, Peanuts, Soybeans, Wheat, Vegetables, Rice, Canola, Sorghum

    Creative Biogene United States, NY, Shirley

    Business Title: Creative Biogene
    Job Title: Other Ag Professional, microbiology agriculture
    Interests: Swine

    Isla Miller United States, NY, Shirley

    Business Title: Lifeasible
    Job Title: Other Ag Professional, Marketing
    Interests: Marketing

  • No Groups Found
  • No Articles Found
  • No Questions Found
  • Posted By Kosona Chriv
    Dec 20, 2016 

    Prospecting for Energy-Rich Renewable Raw Materials: Sorghum Stem Case Study

    Authors: Caitlin S. Byrt , Natalie S. Betts, Hwei-Ting Tan, Wai Li Lim, Riksfardini A. Ermawar, Hai Yen Nguyen, Neil J. Shirley, Jelle Lahnstein, Kendall Corbin, Geoffrey B. Fincher, Vic Knauf, Rachel A. Burton

    Publisher: PLOS One

    Sorghum vegetative tissues are becoming increasingly important for biofuel production. The composition of sorghum stem tissues is influenced by genotype, environment and photoperiod sensitivity, and varies widely between varieties and also between different stem tissues (outer rind vs inner pith). Here, the amount of cellulose, (1,3;1,4)-?-glucan, arabinose and xylose in the stems of twelve diverse sorghum varieties, including four photoperiod-sensitive varieties, was measured. At maturity, most photoperiod-insensitive lines had 1% w/w (1,3;1,4)-?-glucan in stem pith tissue whilst photoperiod-sensitive varieties remained in a vegetative stage and accumulated up to 6% w/w (1,3;1,4)-?-glucan in the same tissue. Three sorghum lines were chosen for further study: a cultivated grain variety (Sorghum bicolor BTx623), a sweet variety (S. bicolor Rio) and a photoperiod-sensitive wild line (S. bicolor ssp. verticilliflorum Arun). The Arun line accumulated 5.5% w/w (1,3;1,4)-?-glucan and had higher SbCslF6 and SbCslH3 transcript levels in pith tissues than did photoperiod-insensitive varieties Rio and BTx623 (<1% w/w pith (1,3;1,4)-?-glucan). To assess the digestibility of the three varieties, stem tissue was treated with either hydrolytic enzymes or dilute acid and the release of fermentable glucose was determined. Despite having the highest lignin content, Arun yielded significantly more glucose than the other varieties, and theoretical calculation of ethanol yields was 10 344 L ha-1 from this sorghum stem tissue. These data indicate that sorghum stem (1,3;1,4)-?-glucan content may have a significant effect on digestibility and bioethanol yields. This information opens new avenues of research to generate sorghum lines optimised for biofuel production.

    Illustration Photo: Sorghum grown at the Stiles Farm in Thrall, Texas, USA (Credit: Blair Fannin / AgriLife Today / Flickr CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)
    https://adalidda.net/posts/pXMdvEptXE7j2cv4C/prospecting-for-energy-rich-renewable-raw-materials-sorghum
    Post Img

    Post As

    Viewable By

    My Followers
    • Everyone

      Every person viewing AgFuse.

    • My Followers

      Members who follow me.

    • Group Members

      Select a group I follow.

    Post As

    Posted By AgFuse Administrator
    Nov 4, 2022 

    FACES BEHIND FOOD - REPOST
    We've been raising bison on our Ontario farm for 30 years. My wife Shirley and I were both raised on dairy farms and were looking for something different to raise when we got married. There are about 30 bison farmers who are part of the Ontario Bison Association. We now have about 100 animals in the herd including a number of calves born this spring.
    Bison are an easy animal to look after. There's not a lot of work involved. They're really healthy and rarely need a vet. When it comes time to give birth, the cow has her calf and there it goes -- no help needed! You've got to respect bison; they never lose their wild instinct. The less they are handled, the better. An exception to that is Lucy. She was born blind and has become a bit of a pet on this farm. She loves having her head scratched.
    There are two types of bison -- Wood and Plains. These are Plains.
    Because it's a small industry in Ontario, farmers have to do their own marketing and promotion. We have been selling our bison meat at the London Covent Garden Farmers Market for over 20 years. And to a couple of local restaurants. It's a great meat -- its low in fat, lower in cholesterol, high in protein, and iron. The ground meat is awesome in so many recipes.
    --Bruce, Ontario bison farmer
    @BlanbrookBisonFarm @OntarioBisonAssociation
    PHOTO CREDIT - FACES BEHIND FOOD
    Post Img
    8 Upvotes
    2 Comments

    Post As

    Viewable By

    My Followers
    • Everyone

      Every person viewing AgFuse.

    • My Followers

      Members who follow me.

    • Group Members

      Select a group I follow.

    Post As