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Search results for 'Society Hill'

  • Rodney Michael United States, SC, Society Hill

    Business Title: Treely
    Job Title: Farmer, Landowner, Other Ag Professional, Founder
    About: $*@! Follower / Family Man / Entrepreneur
    Interests: Ag Policy, Organic Row Crops, Timber, Marketing, Agribusiness, Farmland and Real Estate, Fishing

    Yadwinder Singh Dhillon India, State of Punjab, Firozpur

    Job Title: Farmer
    Interests: Canola, Corn, Cotton, Rice, Wheat, Organic Specialty Crops, Vegetables

    Andy Phillips United States, AL, Valley Head

    Business Title: Eagle View Farm
    Job Title: Manager
    Interests: Agribusiness, Timber

    Mattie Hill United States, NY, Bronxville

    Business Title: Mattie Hill Farms
    Job Title: Agricultural Engineer
    About: An Agricultural Engineer, Consultant, Realtor and Investor who's interest is to contribute positively in Agriculture by improving technologies to boost food production and ensure food safety. Hit me up for further details
    Interests: Corn, Cotton, Peanuts, Soybeans, Wheat, Vegetables, Rice, Canola, Sorghum, Beef, Dairy, Poultry, Swine, Cover Crops, Ag Policy, Precision Agriculture, Organic Row Crops, Irrigation, Timber, Marketing, Agribusiness

    Phillip Neal United States, OH, Troy

    Interests: Corn, Soybeans, Ag Policy

    Sarah Hill United States, SD, Arlington

    Interests: Beef, Dairy, Ag Policy, Marketing, Agribusiness

  • Rodney Michael United States, SC, Society Hill

    Business Title: Treely
    Job Title: Farmer, Landowner, Other Ag Professional, Founder
    About: $*@! Follower / Family Man / Entrepreneur
    Interests: Ag Policy, Organic Row Crops, Timber, Marketing, Agribusiness, Farmland and Real Estate, Fishing

    Yadwinder Singh Dhillon India, State of Punjab, Firozpur

    Job Title: Farmer
    Interests: Canola, Corn, Cotton, Rice, Wheat, Organic Specialty Crops, Vegetables

    Andy Phillips United States, AL, Valley Head

    Business Title: Eagle View Farm
    Job Title: Manager
    Interests: Agribusiness, Timber

    Mattie Hill United States, NY, Bronxville

    Business Title: Mattie Hill Farms
    Job Title: Agricultural Engineer
    About: An Agricultural Engineer, Consultant, Realtor and Investor who's interest is to contribute positively in Agriculture by improving technologies to boost food production and ensure food safety. Hit me up for further details
    Interests: Corn, Cotton, Peanuts, Soybeans, Wheat, Vegetables, Rice, Canola, Sorghum, Beef, Dairy, Poultry, Swine, Cover Crops, Ag Policy, Precision Agriculture, Organic Row Crops, Irrigation, Timber, Marketing, Agribusiness

    Phillip Neal United States, OH, Troy

    Interests: Corn, Soybeans, Ag Policy

    Sarah Hill United States, SD, Arlington

    Interests: Beef, Dairy, Ag Policy, Marketing, Agribusiness

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  • The Future of Fruit Farming: MD2 Pineapple

    By Jenny Hoo

    Published Sep 13, 2019 

    Pineapple pineapple cultivation Of late, the talk of the town seems to be revolving around the planting of MD2 pineapple. The questions is, why is this MD2 pineapple so popular?Pineapple is known to contain highest amount of vitamin C among all various types of fruits. It also contains a fair amount of magnesium, calcium, potassium and iron and develops a bromelin, of which is a type of enzyme. First started back in 1961, a hybrid variety namely “73-114”, developed by Pineapple Research Institude (PRI) in Hawaii was found to be extraordinary and was taken to Costa Rica for its first trial industrial planting... Currently, the main producers for pineapples are Thailand, the Phillipines, Brazil, China and Mexico...

    Categories: Agribusiness, Organic Row Crops, Vegetables

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    What Farmers Need to Know About Mycorrhizae

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Nov 2, 2018 

    What is mycorrhizal fungi? University of Alberta biological scientist JC Cahill says that mycorrhizas are actually the interaction between a fungus and a plant... The way AMF works, Cahill explains, is that they grow inside the plant’s roots, and in exchange for sugar from the plant, the hyphae — the threadlike filaments of the fungi — capture water and nutrients in the soil for the plant. While this symbiotic relationship is often seen and discussed as a benefit to crop production, Cahill and Hart warn that’s not always the case... Cahill notes that part of the reason mycorrhizae may help with crop protection is because the AMF are already living in the plant... When Mycorrhizae Becomes ParasiticWhile AMF can provide many benefits for plants, Cahill says that in some situations the relationship can be parasitic...

    Categories: Cover Crops

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    Ten Ways to Increase Your Farm's Profits This Year

    By AgFuse Exclusive Content

    Updated Dec 30, 2019 

    Part 1: Know Your True Cost of Production Why Your TCOP Matters How to Calculate Your TCOP Part 2: Take the Emotions Out of Your Marketing Plan Why You Need a Plan How to Create a Marketing Matrix How to Determine Your Marketable Inventory How to Use a Marketing Matrix Why You Need an Accountability Partner Part 3: Replace Dead Assets What Are Dead Assets? What Are Productive Assets? Part 4: Manage Your Cash Flow Conversion Cycle What a Cash Flow Conversion Cycle Is How to Speed Up Incoming Flows How to Postpone Outgoing Flows How to Minimize Paying Interest Part 5: Start Using Cover Crops. . . And Get Paid To Do It Why Cover Crops Make Sense How to Obtain Funding Part 6: Take Your Own Soil Samples Why You Should Get Your Own Sampler Who Else You Can Get Consultations From How This Approach Helps You Save Part 7: Bid Out Inputs Why You Should Be In Contact With Multiple Dealers What the Ground Rules Are For Getting Multiple Bids Part 8: Manage Your Fields By Zone How to Create Productivity Zones How to Use Productivity Zones How the Management System Affects Profits Part 9: Focus on Efficiency Over Growth Why Efficiency Matters More Than Size How to Increase Revenue How to Reduce Costs How Increased Efficiency Can Lead to Scaling Part 10: Know Your Optimal Scale... If the special terms make your item cost more or include hidden interest, then run for the hills...

    Categories: Agribusiness, Marketing, Cover Crops

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    Variable-Rating Fertilizer: Does It Pay Off?

    By Laura Barrera

    Updated May 12, 2020 

    For growers who are trying to follow the “4Rs” of nutrient stewardship — applying the right fertilizer source at the right rate, at the right time, and in the right place, as set forth by The Fertilizer Institute — variable-rate technology (VRT) can help them tackle two of the four, as it can determine the right rate and the right place based on prescription maps. Unfortunately, it doesn’t guarantee those benefits will provide a return on investment. Consider a study conducted in North Dakota, Montana and Minnesota from 2000-2003, where fields were divided so that nitrogen fertilizer was either variable-rated or applied uniformly. As the North Dakota State University (NDSU) article explains, using nitrogen fertilizer recommendations at the time and variable-rate applying it on a zone approach provided no economic advantage over the uniform rate... In that 2000-2003 study the NDSU article referenced, researchers found areas on lower slopes with higher soil organic matter in Montana did not respond to nitrogen, while “lower-yielding areas on hilltops and eroded slopes required more nitrogen per productive bushel than previously expected...

    Categories: Precision Agriculture

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    How to Create the Most Effective Soil Sampling Program

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Oct 1, 2020 

    With harvest either underway or on the horizon for most growers in the U. S. , now is a good time to prepare for your soil sampling program. Most universities and the NRCS recommend taking soil samples in the off-season, after the last crop harvest, and before the next cash crop is planted... Ackerson explains that these tiny, localized spots — such as wet spots or highly eroded hillsides — may have different soil chemistries that can throw off the composite sample because they only represent a minimal area...

    Categories: Precision Agriculture, Soil Health

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    20 Years Later: What Roundup Ready Crops Taught Us About Weed Management

    By Amanda Allworth

    Published Aug 21, 2018 

    It’s been over two decades since the first Roundup Ready crops were planted in commercial fields. At the time of introduction, the technology was revolutionary for farmers, who found a highly effective and convenient chemistry to control a broad spectrum of weeds. Roundup Ready corn and soybeans quickly became the norm in fields across the United States, and as a result, application of glyphosate increased dramatically. The initial ease and success of Roundup Ready technology may have caused some farmers to become lax with their weed management programs, which was ultimately a factor in the introduction of glyphosate-resistant weeds... Source: Weed Science Society of America, 2011By the time farmers started to understand what was happening in their fields, it was too late to turn back...

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    How Brazilian Big Agriculture is Destroying the Brazilian Amazon

    By Maria Dampman

    Published Apr 4, 2018 

    The rampant deforestation of the Amazon began in the 1970s when the government of Brazil determined they needed to build over 9,000 miles of roads help integrate the rainforest with the populated bordering areas. As the deeper parts of the rainforest became accessible, development of these lands became possible, and once begun, continued at an alarming rate. Farmers, loggers and cattle ranchers cleared forest to create grazing land as well as to grow highly profitable crops like soy. In the beginning, no one was aware of the disastrous environmental consequences of destroying the forest often described as “the lungs of the Earth... Current MOJ Torquato Jardim has taken an even harsher stance, stating the indigenous people need to be “assimilated with civil society” and that there is a “need to make the land useful...

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    What The Intelligent Investor Can Teach Us About Farming

    By The Crossover

    Published Apr 20, 2018 

    The Intelligent Investor, a book by Benjamin Graham, is widely considered to be the best book on value investing ever written. The book (and it's author) had a profound effect on the way people think about investing. Graham was extremely influential to many titans in the world of investing. ... Buffett has explained compounding using a vivid image of rolling a wet snowball down a really long snowy hill...

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    Early Cover Crop Benefits: What Can You Expect in the First Year?

    By Laura Barrera

    Published May 17, 2018 

    In 1995, Pennsylvania farmer Steve Groff was speaking at an event when he asked the audience the question: Do cover crops pay off?His thinking at the time was that he had been no-tilling since 1982, and maybe if he no-tilled long enough, he wouldn’t need them. Ray Weil, a soil ecologist with the University of Maryland, happened to hear his question and approached Groff about doing a cover crop study on his farm. It turned into a 12-year project, from 1995 to 2007. It was in 1999, four years into it, Groff got the answer to his question... “If you have 3-foot deep topsoil in Illinois, you’re not going to see a dramatic difference in the soil as you would in maybe another soil that’s on a hillside, or rocky, or sandier,” he says...

    Categories: Cover Crops

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    Nuisance Lawsuits are Taking a Bite Out of Big Pork

    By Maria Dampman

    Published Aug 17, 2018 

    In 1611, William Aldred took his neighbor to court. Thomas Benton was being sued for “erecting a hogstye so near the house of the plaintiff that the air thereof was corrupted. ” In common language, the pigs stank, making it impossible for Aldred to enjoy his home which, in his words, had become “unbearable to live in. ” The courts sided with Aldred, saying the odor was “depriving him of his dignity” and therefore, a violation of his rights... “Ultimately, I think Smithfield can do better and producers can do better but society has to bear responsibility...

    Categories: Swine

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  • Posted By Rodney Michael
    Feb 23 

    We found this Coker Pedigreed Seed Company, "Coker Cottons for 1945", in the Coker & Rogers Store building, Society Hill.  Very cool!

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    Posted By Rodney Michael
    Sep 29, 2020 

    Saw this today in the former Coker & Roger's Store, Society Hill SC... had a date of 1985.

    #Blenheim #BlenheimGingerAle

    #SocietyHill

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    Posted By Mark Smith
    Mar 31 

    #AgHistory

    Farming, at it's core, is about taking nutrients from elsewhere, and relocating these elements to the farm so that something can be grown in order that people can eventually consume the products that in turn contain these elements. Pretty basic. To that end, if we look at farming as logistics, we have to consider the soil as the primary "logistics node". As populations grow, they will eventually outstrip the carrying capacity of of a particular plot of ground (exceed the logistical capacity of that particular node). Poor practices will certainly outstrip them sooner. Historically, even the native Americans consumed the fertility of their ground, forcing them to move maize crops elsewhere. Connecticut Governor John Winthrop published in the 'Philosophical Transactions' of the Royal Society of London in 1678 that where the "...ground is bad or worn out..." the Indians used to put 2 or 3 fishes beneath or adjacent to each corn hill (about 6 inches high and 3-4 seeds each hill). Historically, it would be incorrect to say that the only cause of worn out soil (especially since it is a burgeoning field of study) is modern farming practices. Some practices certainly are more detrimental than others, but as the native Americans in Colonial times understood, there is still a limit as to what a specific plot of ground can produce. Interestingly, most of us in agriculture have heard of the three sisters, and have even seen cartoons with a native American placing a fish in the soil, yet failed to connect the dots as to WHY it was placed there in the first place.

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    Posted By Laura Barrera
    Nov 2, 2018 

    https://agfuse.com/article/what-farmers-need-to-know-about-mycorrhizae
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    Posted By The Crossover
    Apr 20, 2018 

    https://agfuse.com/article/what-the-intelligent-investor-can-teach-us-about-farming
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    Posted By Mark Smith
    Mar 25 

    #AgHistory

    Ok - so I have had to take some time away from #AgHistory as I myself am getting my own farm ready for the season, and working in between boughts of bad weather. As a side note, my grandpappy used to say one is never nearer to God than when farming (because we are always praying for something - better weather, more rain, less rain, etc.). While I am adopting no-till on my farm, I have had to break ground none-the-less in order to eliminate some resistant plow pan in certain parts of my small field. Being on a budget, I had to borrow the neighbors 2 bottom plow (an older international harvester of amazing quality). Tuning that to the depth I had hoped to plow took longer than I thought, and this no longer had coulters (and the landside was well worn). At least the furrow wheel was functional. My first time with a traditional plow was a hot mess, and this time I was reminded of how much pride must have been had in ones ability to keep tight and true rows (I do not yet have that proficiency - Ha!). I was also reminded of how challenging the first settlers livelihoods were during this country's settlement. The pilgrims had no plows for the first 12 years (only hoes and mattocks). In 1636, there were only 30 plows in all of the Massachusettss Bay Colony. Plows were mentioned in the inventories of only 16 of 58 estates in Essex County from 1636. A century later they were far more common, but made of wood. Even after the shares were made of iron, the moldboard was still made of wood. Additionally, these were all locally made, and subject to the whims of local ploughwright. Often, these would require 2 men and a boy to plow; one to manhandle the plow, one to continually force the plow into the ground by riding the beam, and the boy to scrape mud from the moldboard. Later, in 1798 Thomas Jefferson mathematically proved that a general design for a plow could be mass produced for use everywhere (letter to Sir John Sinclair, printed in the American Philosophical Society in 1799). In 1797 designed a cast iron plow that was never accepted, in part because it was said that cast iron poisoned the soil and promoted weed growth. With what we now know about our weed-banks, the second myth may actually have had some truth to it as this plow undoubtedly turned soil more efficiently. Note that it wasnt until 1839 that a moldboard was designed to actually turn and pulverize the soil (Samuel Witherow and David Pierce). Fast forward, and we can see in hindsight how these developments improved our abilities to feed our families and society. In 1830, when grain was sown by hand it required 55.7 man-hours (per acre) to sow and harvest wheat. In 1896, with horse drawn equipment the same took 8.8 man-hours. In 1930 using a tractor and drill it took only 3.3 man-hours. SO much more can be said on the subject, and I would argue that there is no other single area of specialization than this which has permitted the growth and health of our nation.

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    Posted By Cover Crops
    May 18, 2018 

    https://agfuse.com/article/early-cover-crop-benefits-what-can-you-expect-in-the-first-year-
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    Posted By John Moody
    Jul 12, 2018 

    https://agfuse.com/article/a-tale-of-two-dairies---part-two
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    Posted By John Moody
    Apr 3, 2018 

    https://agfuse.com/article/welcome-to-some-small-farm
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    Posted By Laura Barrera
    May 17, 2018 

    https://agfuse.com/article/early-cover-crop-benefits-what-can-you-expect-in-the-first-year-
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