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Search results for 'Soil & Water Management'

  • Key Factor in Improving Soil Water Infiltration Rates: Living Roots

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Jan 22, 2020 

    One way to help manage these high rainfall events is to improve soil water infiltration — the faster it can enter the soil, the less likely it will pond or run off the farm, taking valuable soil and nutrients with it... ”The second most influential practice was cover crops, which the meta-analysis found improved soil water infiltration by an average 35%... Basche and DeLonge also noted there was evidence that cover crops had a greater impact on water infiltration rates in coarsely textured soils with higher sand content and less clay... Basche adds that it’s important to note that with an analysis like this, it can be hard to find general patterns about how much the environment, such as soil types, impacts the results. “You are limited by what studies are included in your database, which do not represent a full distribution of soils and environments,” she explains...

    Categories: Cover Crops

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    4 Steps to Building Soil Organic Matter in the South

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Jul 18, 2018 

    As we learn more about what goes on in the world beneath our feet, increased attention has been placed on soil organic matter... While it only makes up a small percentage of most soils, the Sustainable Agriculture Research & Education (SARE) says it’s the “very foundation for healthy and productive soils” — and the more organic matter there is, the better the results. Consider the following findings from SARE and the NRCS:A study of soils in Michigan demonstrated potential crop-yield increases of about 12% for every 1% organic matter... One percent of organic matter in the top 6 inches of soil holds approximately 27,000 gallons of water per acre... When North Carolina corn yield champion Russell Hedrick increased his soil organic matter from 2...

    Categories: Cover Crops

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    Middle Tennessee State University soil scientist Samuel Haruna analyzes a soil sample from his research fields to see how cover crops impact soil temperature. Photo provided by Samuel Haruna.

    Struggling with Soil Temperature During Planting? Cover Crops Can Help

    By Laura Barrera

    Updated Aug 17, 2020 

    You can pick the right seed, use the right equipment, apply the right inputs, and plant at the right depth, but without the right soil temperature, your crops are likely to struggle... Why Soil Temperature MattersWhile soil temperature has an impact on the soil and crop production throughout the growing season, the NRCS says it’s most critical at planting, when it drives seed germination and directly affects plant growth. “Most soil organisms function best at an optimum soil temperature,” says the USDA agency, adding that soil temperature influences soil moisture content, aeration, and the availability of plant nutrients. This graphic from the NRCS shows what happens to plants and soil life based on the soil temperature. The soil has to warm up to a certain degree for plants to get off to a good start, but if it continues to heat up and does so rapidly, that can harm plant growth...

    Categories: Cover Crops

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    Hydroponics 101: A Basic Guide to Start Soilless Cultivation

    By Miriam Pitzalis

    Updated Aug 20, 2020 

    Soilless cultivation is an innovative process that was introduced in recent years for protected crops. This practice has been established for the large-scale production of fresh vegetables and ornamental plants, especially in the countries of Northern Europe, with the main purposes of:- Increasing production- Optimizing acreage - Reducing working times- Reducing the need for water and fertilizers - Optimizing climatic conditionsThe continuous climate changes, the increasing interest in environmental impacts, and the availability of cheap facilities and simple technologies all lead to an increased use of soilless cultivation in commercial applications. When talking about soilless crops, we’re referring to two types of systems:- Real hydroponics, without substrate: the root system of a plant is directly in contact with the water and the nutrient solution (floating system, nutrient film technique, aeroponics)- Hydroponics with substrate: the plant grows on inert, organic materials, or a mixture between them (cultivation bags, slabs, pots or bins)In these systems, fertigation feeds the plants and involves the use of water-soluble fertilizers... Advantages and disadvantages of soilless cultivationSoilless cultivation has numerous advantages like:- Increasing unit yields and anticipating harvest- Improving the quality of the final product, such as the size and uniform physical-chemical characteristics of the fruits, due to the controlled and accurate management of nutrition and climatic parameters- Using easily replaceable structures in case of reconversion- Reducing the labor for demanding processing operations, such as tillage and soil disinfection- Reducing water consumption, especially in plants managed in a closed cycle in areas with limited water availability- Reducing the use of pesticides and adopting integrated pest management strategies more easilyAlthough the advantages can be very encouraging in the decision to adopt these systems, it is also necessary to consider the disadvantages and difficulties that must be faced: - Insufficient know-how to understand how to manage fertigation, irrigation, crop care and automatic control unit technology - Need for constant monitoring of various parameters, such as EC, pH, nutrient solution recipe and climate- Greater risk of incurring water or saline stress in case of a blackout, which renders the whole system unusable - Medium-high initial investments - Difficulty in reaching potential productions in the first years, due to facilities management problems - Difficulty in disposing of inorganic substrates at the end of use - Dispersion of the exhausted nutrient solution in the surface layers when using open-cycle systemsWhen you decide to cultivate with a soilless system, you need to choose the ideal system type depending on the place where you intend to work, the plant species, the size, and the budget available... 4: Soilless system with pots for grape cultivation...

    Categories: Irrigation, Precision Agriculture, Vegetables

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    Soil factors that affect yield variability in corn production

    By Mario Petkovski

    Updated Aug 1, 2020 

    Data derived from annual USDA-NASS Crop Production ReportsEvery farmer's dream is to have a field that contains fertile soil, sufficient nutrient content, and a right balance between beneficial and harmful microorganisms and insects... Spatial variability refers to the difference in the yield of certain areas in the same field due to unequal characteristics of soil, plants, and terrain. Factors affecting corn yield variability:Soil textureThe percentage of sand, gravel, and clay in the soil determines its texture. With the help of a simple manual technique, one can quickly identify the soil texture in a specific field. Different texture in spatial distribution differently affects corn yield through variations in nutrient capacity and availability, water capacity and transport, binding or decomposition of pesticides, as well as soil stability itself to different destructive forces...

    Categories: Corn

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    Soil Health Vs. Soil Fertility

    By Monica Pape

    Published Mar 20, 2018 

    In the 52 Weeks of Agronomy Series I've been posting on my website, I took a week and explained this agronomist's take on soil health vs. soil fertility. To read the article and get caught up on the rest of the series follow along at News | The Accidental Agronomist I spoke at a conference in front of 200 farmers and used the term, custom soil fertility programs. At the time I was working as a sales agronomist for a fertilizer company that offered custom fertilizer recommendations based on a farmer’s soil tests... After my talk, I headed back to my table to see a line of guys with soil tests in their hands...

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    Know your soil

    By Dwight Henry

    Published Aug 16, 2018 

    The most powerful information every farmer can harbor is the knowledge of his soil, and how they use this knowledge will decide the outcome of the season. Today conducting soil analysis is one way of accomplishing that, but what other options do you have during the growing season to stay proactive... Combine with other in-crop nutrient maps and/or soil maps to get a full layered picture of information... What if you wanted to monitor your crops during the growing season then Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index SAVI was developed as a modification of the NDVI to correct for the influence of soil brightness... Early growth stage analysis is recommended when there are clearly separated rows or plants and where soil is very apparent...

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    Fear the Same Summit attendees dive deep into soil health at Bottens Family Farm.

    You can talk about what you should do. Or, you can just do it.

    By Megan Silcott

    Published Aug 25 

    There is so much noise and information to sort through, and buzz words gaining momentum like: regenerative ag, carbon credits, soil health, non-gmo, cover crops, relay cropping, companion cropping, and so on and so on... ” Urgency is certainly contributing to the need for large scale soil health adoptions... No matter what, we live and die by our soil... Solutions like the POWER2GRO Crop Production System that can improve agriculture, from the soil up. Monte said, “The ASN team looks at the bigger picture which leads to stronger recommendations for farming with a soil first approach yet keeps profitability at the forefront...

    Categories: Cover Crops, Farm Management, Soil Health

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    Cover Crop Corner: Part 2 Cover Crop Economics: Long-term gains through holistic improvements

    By Feed the Soil, Feed the World

    Published Oct 13 

    By GO SEEDThere are no “quick fixes” when it comes to the health of soils, the benefits take more than overnight to show up... “Soil is the natural capital of the land,” explains Dr Shannon Cappellazzi, GO Seed Director of Research. “By making the investment in soil health, not only are you making an impact on all of the downstream ecosystem services that are related to soil functions, you are also regenerating the land for continued agricultural production... Below are a few ways cover crops enhance soil health, which is all about the capacity of the soil to function as a vital living ecosystem. Dealing with compaction Soil compaction is a common issue for row crop and forage producers resulting from continual hoof and equipment traffic...

    Categories: Conservation Plans, Cover Crops, Farm Management

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    Top 4 ways to stimulate root growth

    By Darren Chan

    Published Sep 3, 2019 

    Importance of healthy rootsFirst, they anchor the plant in place, resisting the forces of wind and running water or mudflow. Secondly, the root system takes in oxygen, water and nutrients from the soil, to move them up through the plant to the stems, leaves, and blooms... Last but not least, scientists have recently discovered that roots actually secrete compounds that affect the microorganisms in the soil, which can help protect the plants from disease and encourage it to absorb nutrients from the soil... On the one hand, they have a good effect on controlling harmful pathogens, guarding the roots against toxins and diseases in soils. On the other hand, they can break down insoluble nutrients and micronutrients in soils and let them more easy to be absorbed by crops...

    Categories: Agribusiness, Dairy, Organic Row Crops

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  • Innovate Water Pakistan, Sindh, Karachi

    Business Title: Invwater.com
    Interests: Ag Policy, Agribusiness, Cover Crops, Canola, Corn, Cotton, Dairy

    Ann Waters

    Interests:

    Dustin Bridgewater United States, CA, San Francisco

    Business Title: Salesforce
    Job Title: Strategic Sourcing
    Interests: Vegetables, Beef, Dairy, Poultry, Precision Agriculture, Organic Row Crops, Marketing, Agribusiness

    Joe Soiler India, Maharashtra, Pune

    Interests: Corn, Cotton, Peanuts, Soybeans, Wheat, Vegetables, Dairy

    D'BluePrint Peay United States, FL, Ft. Pierce

    Business Title: The Understry
    Job Title: Farmer, Other Ag Professional, Festivals
    Interests: Canola, Corn, Peanuts

    Dudink's Garden Canada, British Columbia, Nanaimo

    Interests: Vegetables, Organic Row Crops, Marketing, Agribusiness, Fruit

    Lisa VanWatermeulen United States, IL, Cambridge

    Interests: Corn, Soybeans, Marketing, Agribusiness

    Kristen Anderson United States, CA, Kerman

    Business Title: Farmers Resource Co.
    Job Title: Farmer's Spouse or Family Member, Crop Consultant, Precision Agriculture Specialist
    Interests: Cotton, Crop Protection, Crop Scouting, Fertility, Irrigation, Soil Health, Sustainable Agriculture, Apps, Precision Agriculture, Telemetry, Agribusiness, Farm Management, Operating a Farm, Cover Crops, Hemp, Orchard Crops, Organic Specialty Crops, Tree Nuts

  • Fertility And Soils

    Public
    A group dedicated to providing information on crop fertility and soil qualities.
    Interest: Corn, Cotton, Peanuts, Soybeans, Wheat, Cover Crops, Fertility, Soil Health, Sustainable Agriculture, Conservation Easements, Conservation Plans, NRCS

    Feed the Soil, Feed the World

    Public
    Discoveries are occurring at a record pace as we learn what happens in the soil is as important as what happens above the soil. This is a place to ask good questions, share ideas, research, trials, and experiences. Curiosity, passion and an open mind are what drive innovation and change. Sharing ideas and stories help us learn and can reduce the painful (and costly) experiences. Tell me your story(s) and I'll share mine.
    Interest: Beef, Dairy, Grass-Fed Livestock

    #SoilMatters

    Public
    Soil and everything in it is the focus here. Crop Nutritionists and CCAs know that growing a crop is more than planting, watering and applying fertilizer. It requires testing, planning, monitoring and adjusting the plan as needed.
    Interest: Corn, Wheat, Vegetables, Cover Crops, Ag Policy, Precision Agriculture, Organic Row Crops, Irrigation, Agribusiness

    Farm Finance and Management

    Public
    Here’s a group to discuss all of the finance and management decisions that need to be made when operating a farm.
    Interest: Corn, Cotton, Peanuts, Soybeans, Wheat, Vegetables, Rice, Canola, Sorghum, Beef, Dairy, Poultry, Swine, Cover Crops, Ag Policy, Precision Agriculture, Irrigation, Timber, Marketing, Agribusiness

    Canadian Agriculture & Equipment

    Public
    If You work in Agriculture or a business supporting it, you need to join this group. Let\'s connect and help each other out.
    Interest: Corn, Soybeans, Wheat, Vegetables, Canola, Sorghum, Beef, Dairy, Poultry, Swine, Cover Crops, Ag Policy, Precision Agriculture, Organic Row Crops, Irrigation, Timber, Marketing, Agribusiness

    EXPORT&IMPORT GROUP

    Public
    Fruits and vegetables export and import, trade support, agribusiness
    Interest: Corn, Cotton, Peanuts, Soybeans, Wheat, Vegetables, Rice, Canola, Sorghum, Cover Crops, Ag Policy, Organic Row Crops, Marketing, Agribusiness

    Social Media & Agriculture

    Public
    A place to share ideas, testimonials, and stories about bridging the gap between farmers and the end consumer. If you are passionate about telling your story, join now.
    Interest: Corn, Cotton, Peanuts, Soybeans, Wheat, Vegetables, Rice, Canola, Sorghum, Beef, Dairy, Poultry, Swine, Cover Crops, Ag Policy, Precision Agriculture, Organic Row Crops, Irrigation, Marketing, Agribusiness

    Organic Citrus

    Public
    We are interested in gathering experiences, solutions and history of organic methods in citrus production. As well as record and document unique policy and market access hurdles organic citrus growers face in each different region of the world.
    Interest: Organic Row Crops, Crop Protection, Fertility, Irrigation, Soil Health, Sustainable Agriculture, Apps, Precision Agriculture, Telemetry, Ag Commentary, Marketing, News, Ag Policy, Agribusiness, Farm Management, Farmland and Real Estate, Operating a Farm, Conservation Easements, Conservation Plans, Cover Crops, Orchard Crops, Organic Specialty Crops, Homesteading

  • Key Factor in Improving Soil Water Infiltration Rates: Living Roots

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Jan 22, 2020 

    One way to help manage these high rainfall events is to improve soil water infiltration — the faster it can enter the soil, the less likely it will pond or run off the farm, taking valuable soil and nutrients with it... ”The second most influential practice was cover crops, which the meta-analysis found improved soil water infiltration by an average 35%... Basche and DeLonge also noted there was evidence that cover crops had a greater impact on water infiltration rates in coarsely textured soils with higher sand content and less clay... Basche adds that it’s important to note that with an analysis like this, it can be hard to find general patterns about how much the environment, such as soil types, impacts the results. “You are limited by what studies are included in your database, which do not represent a full distribution of soils and environments,” she explains...

    Categories: Cover Crops

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    4 Steps to Building Soil Organic Matter in the South

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Jul 18, 2018 

    As we learn more about what goes on in the world beneath our feet, increased attention has been placed on soil organic matter... While it only makes up a small percentage of most soils, the Sustainable Agriculture Research & Education (SARE) says it’s the “very foundation for healthy and productive soils” — and the more organic matter there is, the better the results. Consider the following findings from SARE and the NRCS:A study of soils in Michigan demonstrated potential crop-yield increases of about 12% for every 1% organic matter... One percent of organic matter in the top 6 inches of soil holds approximately 27,000 gallons of water per acre... When North Carolina corn yield champion Russell Hedrick increased his soil organic matter from 2...

    Categories: Cover Crops

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    Middle Tennessee State University soil scientist Samuel Haruna analyzes a soil sample from his research fields to see how cover crops impact soil temperature. Photo provided by Samuel Haruna.

    Struggling with Soil Temperature During Planting? Cover Crops Can Help

    By Laura Barrera

    Updated Aug 17, 2020 

    You can pick the right seed, use the right equipment, apply the right inputs, and plant at the right depth, but without the right soil temperature, your crops are likely to struggle... Why Soil Temperature MattersWhile soil temperature has an impact on the soil and crop production throughout the growing season, the NRCS says it’s most critical at planting, when it drives seed germination and directly affects plant growth. “Most soil organisms function best at an optimum soil temperature,” says the USDA agency, adding that soil temperature influences soil moisture content, aeration, and the availability of plant nutrients. This graphic from the NRCS shows what happens to plants and soil life based on the soil temperature. The soil has to warm up to a certain degree for plants to get off to a good start, but if it continues to heat up and does so rapidly, that can harm plant growth...

    Categories: Cover Crops

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    Hydroponics 101: A Basic Guide to Start Soilless Cultivation

    By Miriam Pitzalis

    Updated Aug 20, 2020 

    Soilless cultivation is an innovative process that was introduced in recent years for protected crops. This practice has been established for the large-scale production of fresh vegetables and ornamental plants, especially in the countries of Northern Europe, with the main purposes of:- Increasing production- Optimizing acreage - Reducing working times- Reducing the need for water and fertilizers - Optimizing climatic conditionsThe continuous climate changes, the increasing interest in environmental impacts, and the availability of cheap facilities and simple technologies all lead to an increased use of soilless cultivation in commercial applications. When talking about soilless crops, we’re referring to two types of systems:- Real hydroponics, without substrate: the root system of a plant is directly in contact with the water and the nutrient solution (floating system, nutrient film technique, aeroponics)- Hydroponics with substrate: the plant grows on inert, organic materials, or a mixture between them (cultivation bags, slabs, pots or bins)In these systems, fertigation feeds the plants and involves the use of water-soluble fertilizers... Advantages and disadvantages of soilless cultivationSoilless cultivation has numerous advantages like:- Increasing unit yields and anticipating harvest- Improving the quality of the final product, such as the size and uniform physical-chemical characteristics of the fruits, due to the controlled and accurate management of nutrition and climatic parameters- Using easily replaceable structures in case of reconversion- Reducing the labor for demanding processing operations, such as tillage and soil disinfection- Reducing water consumption, especially in plants managed in a closed cycle in areas with limited water availability- Reducing the use of pesticides and adopting integrated pest management strategies more easilyAlthough the advantages can be very encouraging in the decision to adopt these systems, it is also necessary to consider the disadvantages and difficulties that must be faced: - Insufficient know-how to understand how to manage fertigation, irrigation, crop care and automatic control unit technology - Need for constant monitoring of various parameters, such as EC, pH, nutrient solution recipe and climate- Greater risk of incurring water or saline stress in case of a blackout, which renders the whole system unusable - Medium-high initial investments - Difficulty in reaching potential productions in the first years, due to facilities management problems - Difficulty in disposing of inorganic substrates at the end of use - Dispersion of the exhausted nutrient solution in the surface layers when using open-cycle systemsWhen you decide to cultivate with a soilless system, you need to choose the ideal system type depending on the place where you intend to work, the plant species, the size, and the budget available... 4: Soilless system with pots for grape cultivation...

    Categories: Irrigation, Precision Agriculture, Vegetables

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    Soil factors that affect yield variability in corn production

    By Mario Petkovski

    Updated Aug 1, 2020 

    Data derived from annual USDA-NASS Crop Production ReportsEvery farmer's dream is to have a field that contains fertile soil, sufficient nutrient content, and a right balance between beneficial and harmful microorganisms and insects... Spatial variability refers to the difference in the yield of certain areas in the same field due to unequal characteristics of soil, plants, and terrain. Factors affecting corn yield variability:Soil textureThe percentage of sand, gravel, and clay in the soil determines its texture. With the help of a simple manual technique, one can quickly identify the soil texture in a specific field. Different texture in spatial distribution differently affects corn yield through variations in nutrient capacity and availability, water capacity and transport, binding or decomposition of pesticides, as well as soil stability itself to different destructive forces...

    Categories: Corn

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    Soil Health Vs. Soil Fertility

    By Monica Pape

    Published Mar 20, 2018 

    In the 52 Weeks of Agronomy Series I've been posting on my website, I took a week and explained this agronomist's take on soil health vs. soil fertility. To read the article and get caught up on the rest of the series follow along at News | The Accidental Agronomist I spoke at a conference in front of 200 farmers and used the term, custom soil fertility programs. At the time I was working as a sales agronomist for a fertilizer company that offered custom fertilizer recommendations based on a farmer’s soil tests... After my talk, I headed back to my table to see a line of guys with soil tests in their hands...

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    Know your soil

    By Dwight Henry

    Published Aug 16, 2018 

    The most powerful information every farmer can harbor is the knowledge of his soil, and how they use this knowledge will decide the outcome of the season. Today conducting soil analysis is one way of accomplishing that, but what other options do you have during the growing season to stay proactive... Combine with other in-crop nutrient maps and/or soil maps to get a full layered picture of information... What if you wanted to monitor your crops during the growing season then Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index SAVI was developed as a modification of the NDVI to correct for the influence of soil brightness... Early growth stage analysis is recommended when there are clearly separated rows or plants and where soil is very apparent...

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    Fear the Same Summit attendees dive deep into soil health at Bottens Family Farm.

    You can talk about what you should do. Or, you can just do it.

    By Megan Silcott

    Published Aug 25 

    There is so much noise and information to sort through, and buzz words gaining momentum like: regenerative ag, carbon credits, soil health, non-gmo, cover crops, relay cropping, companion cropping, and so on and so on... ” Urgency is certainly contributing to the need for large scale soil health adoptions... No matter what, we live and die by our soil... Solutions like the POWER2GRO Crop Production System that can improve agriculture, from the soil up. Monte said, “The ASN team looks at the bigger picture which leads to stronger recommendations for farming with a soil first approach yet keeps profitability at the forefront...

    Categories: Cover Crops, Farm Management, Soil Health

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    Cover Crop Corner: Part 2 Cover Crop Economics: Long-term gains through holistic improvements

    By Feed the Soil, Feed the World

    Published Oct 13 

    By GO SEEDThere are no “quick fixes” when it comes to the health of soils, the benefits take more than overnight to show up... “Soil is the natural capital of the land,” explains Dr Shannon Cappellazzi, GO Seed Director of Research. “By making the investment in soil health, not only are you making an impact on all of the downstream ecosystem services that are related to soil functions, you are also regenerating the land for continued agricultural production... Below are a few ways cover crops enhance soil health, which is all about the capacity of the soil to function as a vital living ecosystem. Dealing with compaction Soil compaction is a common issue for row crop and forage producers resulting from continual hoof and equipment traffic...

    Categories: Conservation Plans, Cover Crops, Farm Management

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    Top 4 ways to stimulate root growth

    By Darren Chan

    Published Sep 3, 2019 

    Importance of healthy rootsFirst, they anchor the plant in place, resisting the forces of wind and running water or mudflow. Secondly, the root system takes in oxygen, water and nutrients from the soil, to move them up through the plant to the stems, leaves, and blooms... Last but not least, scientists have recently discovered that roots actually secrete compounds that affect the microorganisms in the soil, which can help protect the plants from disease and encourage it to absorb nutrients from the soil... On the one hand, they have a good effect on controlling harmful pathogens, guarding the roots against toxins and diseases in soils. On the other hand, they can break down insoluble nutrients and micronutrients in soils and let them more easy to be absorbed by crops...

    Categories: Agribusiness, Dairy, Organic Row Crops

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  • I'm looking for an agribusiness writer

    By Marjorie Valin

    Published Jul 30 

    Does anyone know a writer with agribusiness, digital or prescription ag experience? Or an agribusiness expert with writing experience? We're looking for someone to develop content with experience on the agriculture and tech/business side. Please reach out to me here or on Linkedin.

    Categories: Sustainable Agriculture, Precision Agriculture, Agribusiness

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    How much water onion needs?

    By Zubair Ahmad

    Published Mar 18, 2020 

    I just want to know how much water onion needs for proper growth?

    Categories: Vegetables, Agribusiness, Irrigation

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    Looking at John Deere's for 20 acre CSA, and poultry any advise.

    By Jordan Trinci

    Published Aug 3, 2020 

    Can't decide on tractor model

    Categories: Vegetables, Poultry

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    What's the difference between a Brent and Unverferth Grain Cart?

    By Anonymous Member

    Published Sep 21 

    Categories: Agribusiness, Purchasing

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    Just curious if there are any Ag Pro's here from California?

    By Neil Knaak

    Published Sep 1 

    Curious who on this platform is from the sunshine state?

    Categories: Apps

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    What are your impressions of Harvest Profit software?

    By Anonymous Member

    Published Dec 1, 2020 

    Categories: Apps, Marketing, Farm Management

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    Why do fertilizer recommendations differ from lab to lab?

    By Anonymous Member

    Published Mar 12 

    Categories: Fertility, Soil Health

    3 Upvotes

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    What is the best way to increase yields per hectare?

    By Zubair Ahmad

    Published Mar 18, 2020 

    Hello everyone I'm Zubair here from mountainous region of Pakistan. Im trying to increase my yields, what is the best way.

    Categories: Corn, Wheat, Irrigation

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    What farm analytics services have you used?

    By Anonymous Member

    Published Mar 25 

    Looking for recommendations: What farm analytics services have you used? What do you like and don't like about them?

    Categories: Crop Scouting, Precision Agriculture

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  • Call for applications: Startups with innovative solutions to create and implement sustainable and energy-efficient practices to make water scarcity a thing of the past

    The 100+ Accelerator will host and provide funding to start-ups to solve challenges designed to create a more sustainable world for all.

    The 100+ Accelerator is interested in applications that address the following challenges:
    New technology for production sequencing to minimize line flushing/CIP/sterilization treatment cycles

    Commercially viable investment approaches for smaller scale watershed conservation projects (proximity to current AB InBev operations is a plus)

    New solutions to measure improvement in water quality or availability in high stressed watersheds. Can include citizen-science approaches.

    New solutions that achieve higher energy efficiency or lower rejection rates of treated water (with or without using reverse osmosis (RO) tech)

    Beer filtration innovations that are more environmentally-friendly

    Innovations for disposal or transformation of the high salt concentration/brine solutions of RO/desalination (Applications in remotely located areas particularly encouraged.)

    Reliable, low-cost, easy-to-use technologies for measuring water at all points of consumption in our breweries (ideally with data transfer capabilities)

    New solutions or technologies in water reuse/recycling incl. ways to distribute treated brewery effluent for shared local benefit (both urban and rural)

    Solutions for retaining rainwater in watershed soil longer

    New technology applications for optimized process and waste reduction in brewing or manufacturing

    Cost effective solutions to provide quality water access and sanitation services to communities not connected to formal water infrastructure systems

    Creating and incentivizing corporate consortium approaches to aquifers/watershed conservation and management

    Data collection of water consumption across supply and value chains as well as data collection and measurement of water action programs to determine efficacy for well and aquifers

    Chemical cleaning agents or processes that reduce water use

    Water-efficient agricultural tools and practices

    End-to-end, energy-efficient & low-cost waste water treatment

    Water recycling in individual/home use

    Application Deadline: October 30, 2019

    Illustration Photo: The High-Efficiency Horticulture and Integrated Supply Chain Project will support the development of 30 hectares of climate-controlled greenhouses equipped with drip irrigation systems in Yerevan to produce tomatoes and bell peppers. (credits: Asian Development Bank / Flickr Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC 2.0))

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    Call for Proposals: Farming systems to improve the sustainability of Mediterranean agro-ecosystems

    The objective of this call for proposals is to develop Mediterranean innovative cropping and livestock systems including inland aquaculture, able to cope with limited resources and environmental constrains while enhancing food production stability over time and ensuring a production of high quality agricultural outputs that will allow increase in farmers’ income and preserve agro-ecosystems integrity and services.

    Design of new production systems should allow adaptation of the Mediterranean farming systems to climate change, reduction and optimization of use of natural resources in particular water and/or potentially polluting inputs (e.g. pesticides, organic and mineral fertilizers, manure and antibiotics), management of soil conservation and/or decrease in erosion and soil salinity.

    Research projects are expected in the following thematic areas: better linkage between livestock (including freshwater aquaculture, as a component of proposals for agro-ecosystem projects) and crop production; a range of different systems should be included (e.g. organic farming, agroecology, agroforestry, …) as well as their resilience to climate change impacts taken into account; valorizing existing biodiversity through sustainable use of underexploited and new species, breeds or varieties of interest in farming systems; development of production of legumes or use of other local Mediterranean varieties/ species and its insertion in cereal soles, crops rotations and crops association. The projects could include the use of innovative technologies, such as digital technologies, smart space data and related data and technologies.

    Dateline for submission: 17th April, 2018 (17:00h CET)

    Illustration Photo: Precision Dairy Farming (credits: UK College of Agriculture, Food & Environment / Flickr Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0))

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    Posted By Fertility And Soils
    Jun 5, 2019 

    https://www.no-tillfarmer.com/articles/8815-soil-health-advocates-helping-farmers-fix-soil-grow-profits

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    Posted By Becky Johnson
    Jan 7 

    "Many questions arise regarding the impact of management decisions on soil chemical, physical, and biological health. How do herbicides, fertilizers, and soil amendment applications affect soil microbial communities? How does soil acidification happen and how do we manage it? What changes I can make to improve soil nutrient cycling and water storage?"

    http://smallgrains.wsu.edu/soil-health-measuring-and-managing

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    Posted By Fertility And Soils
    Aug 21, 2018 

    https://cropwatch.unl.edu/2018/cover-crop-and-crop-residue-management-how-does-it-affect-soil-water-short-and-long-term
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    Posted By Fertility And Soils
    Oct 18, 2018 

    https://agfax.com/2018/10/17/water-management-researchers-use-radar-to-determine-soil-moisture/

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    Posted By Rice Producers
    Dec 27, 2016 

    "A report from the 2016 Southern Agricultural Soil Health, Cover Crops and Water Management Conference."
    http://www.deltafarmpress.com/rice/can-cover-crops-work-rice-rotation
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    Posted By Kosona Chriv
    Aug 15, 2016 

    Agroforestry: A second soil fertility paradigm? A case of soil fertility management in Western Kenya

    Authors: Nelson Mango and Paul Hebinck

    Publisher: Mango & Hebinck, Cogent Social Sciences

    © 2016 Nelson Mango and Paul Hebinck. This open access article is distributed under a Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) 4.0 license.

    This paper explores the claim whether agro-forestry is a second soil fertility paradigm. The answer to this question, however, is not unequivocal. Farmers in Western Kenya generally do not apply fertiliser and rather rely on many soil fertility replenishment (SFR) strategies. Scientists recognised that lowering the costs of restoring fertility is vital to the future of agriculture in the region and beyond. Agroforestry emerged as an alternative strategy to replenish soil fertility and has been introduced through various programmes and institutions in Western Kenya since the early 1990s. Detailed field and case studies show that people are indeed convinced that agro-forestry helps them to replenish soil fertility and that over the years yields indeed have increased. The paper also traces the emergence of localised practices (niches) of soil fertility management. These niches stand for local ways of reproducing soil fertility. These practices coexist with improved fallows, and mutually transform each other through various kinds of interactions at field and village level as well as with technology institutions. Together they reflect the diversified soil fertility options that resonate well with the multiple nature of nutrient and other soil constraints. Low-cost technologies for supplying nutrients to crops are needed on a scale wide enough to improve the livelihood of farmers. The aim of the paper is to show whether and how externally induced improved fallow innovations resonate with farmer-produced niches in the domain of SFR in Luoland. The paper contributes in this way to a more appropriate understanding of socio-technical innovations.
    https://adalidda.net/posts/tDzXz2bJYqeq42HsY/agroforestry-a-second-soil-fertility-paradigm-a-case-of-soil
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    Applications of Artificial Intelligence in Agriculture

    Author: Ngozi Clara Eli-Chukwu

    Journal: Engineering, Technology & Applied Science Research Vol. 9, No. 4, 2019, 4377-4383

    Publisher: Engineering, Technology & Applied Science Research (ETASR)

    The application of Artificial Intelligence (AI) has been evident in the agricultural sector recently. The sector faces numerous challenges in order to maximize its yield including improper soil treatment, disease and pest infestation, big data requirements, low output, and knowledge gap between farmers and technology. The main concept of AI in agriculture is its flexibility, high performance, accuracy, and cost-effectiveness. This paper presents a review of the applications of AI in soil management, crop management, weed management and disease management. A special focus is laid on the strength and limitations of the application and the way in utilizing expert systems for higher productivity.

    Illustration Photo: Application to identify Pathological Disease in Citrus Plant Using TensorFlow and TensorFlow Lite - Powered by Intel® Distribution of OpenVINO™ Toolkit (credits: Intel Corporation / Risab Biswas)

    Check more https://adalidda.com/posts/4Tm2iB4yAbADJMf6y/applications-of-artificial-intelligence-in-agriculture

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    EU's Call for Proposals: Integrated water management in small agricultural catchments

    Activities shall assess the use of small water retention approaches for managing excess and shortage of water and nutrient recovery from water streams. The link between agricultural land management and soil-water management for increased nutrient uptake and water retention should be assessed. Work should focus on affordable and easy-to-implement at the farm level solutions including an economic analysis of proposed measures as well as maintenance of the infrastructure. The analysis of proposed techniques for water management should consider the need for adaptation to climate change and its impact on ecosystem services. Work should allow assessing long-term benefits for the farm and the local ecosystem from the implementation of the natural/small water retention measures. Proposals should fall under the ‘multi-actor approach’ ensuring cooperation between farmers and farmers associations, local water management organization, technology providers, research centres and public administration. Preference will be given to proposals focusing on Continental, Pannonia and Boreal biogeographical regions of Europe as defined by the European Environment Agency.

    Dateline for submission: 23 January 2019 17:00:00 Brussels time

    Illustration Photo: Micro irrigation begins with an economical reuse of irrigation water hydrants at Leafy Greens Farm in the Salinas Valley of California. (credits: USDA Photo by Lance Cheung / Flickr Creative Commons Attribution-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic (CC BY-ND 2.0))

    Check more https://adalidda.com/posts/538fEkHX5RzetpEsf/eu-s-call-for-proposals-integrated-water-management-in-small
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