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Search results for 'Triticale Barley'

  • What Farmers Need to Know About Mycorrhizae

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Nov 2, 2018

    If someone asked you, “How do plants take up the water and nutrients they need?” you’d probably tell them through the roots. But did you know that for many crops, those roots aren’t working alone?That’s because most plant species associate with mycorrhizal fungi. What is mycorrhizal fungi? University of Alberta biological scientist JC Cahill says that mycorrhizas are actually the interaction between a fungus and a plant. Although there are many different types of mycorrhizae, the only one crop farmers need to be concerned about is arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), as 65% of plant species associate with it... Grasses like sorghums, millets, rye, triticale, barley — and oats in particular — are also excellent colonizers...

    Categories: Cover Crops

    Should You Rotate Your Cover Crops? 4 Issues to Consider

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Jun 15, 2018

    You probably know that having a crop rotation is a good thing. Growing different crops back to back provides several benefits, such as preventing pests and disease, improving soil health and reducing fertilizer inputs, all of which can boost your crop yields and your bottom line. By adding cover crops to the mix, you’re diversifying your rotation even more... While peas are usually followed with corn to utilize nitrogen in the soil and break the cycle, Robison says a dairy operation may end up using peas in an oat or triticale mixture back to back for more feed... “And the next year we plant wheat and we don’t spray any grass killer, then we possibly end up with annual ryegrass in the wheat or malting barley or some other high-value crop...

    Categories: Cover Crops

    How Yield Champions Use Cover Crops for Growing Higher Bushels

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Jun 1, 2018

    There are many factors that can influence corn yield. In fact, Fred Below, a plant physiologist at the University of Illinois, identified seven of them, which he dubbed the “Seven Wonders of the Corn Yield World. ”The seven wonders, ranked in order of most influence on yield, are:WeatherNitrogenHybridPrevious cropPlant populationTillageGrowth regulatorsWhile Below was referring to the cash crop rotation in the fourth wonder, some farmers are taking it one step further by seeding cover crops. The benefit of added crop diversity along with improvements to soil health is paying off, as some of these farmers are achieving the highest yields in the country... After the previous corn was harvested, the owner of JRH Grains LLC drilled a 7-way blend of cereal rye, triticale, oats, crimson clover, Austrian winter peas, hairy vetch and Dwarf essex rape...

    How to Use the SmartMix Calculator to Create the Perfect Cover Crop Mix

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Sep 5, 2019

    When it comes to creating a cover crop mix, the options are endless. You need to determine what kind of species you’ll use, how many you’ll use, and at what seeding rates. For anyone new to cover crop blends, these decisions can be overwhelming. Fortunately, there are several free tools available today that can guide both new and experienced cover crop users through the process of developing their own mix... “We need to know what you want to do so we can know whether to use wheat or rye or triticale or oats, because each one may have strengths and weaknesses when it comes to those different goals...

    Categories: Cover Crops

    When is it Too Late to Seed Cover Crops?

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Jan 29, 2019

    If you’re a farmer, at some point you’ll likely experience a late harvest, whether it’s due to Mother Nature or an equipment problem. And if you plan on seeding your cover crops after your crops are off, you have the added challenge of trying to get them seeded in a timely manner. Depending on how late it gets, you may wonder whether it’s even worth seeding them at all... Instead, Ebersole says wheat, triticale and cereal rye are some of the go-to species for late-seeding — according to Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education (SARE), cereal rye can germinate in soil temperatures as low as 34 degrees Fahrenheit, and needs at least 38 degrees to begin growing. If you’re planning on planting corn, you may want to avoid cereal rye and stick with either triticale or a legume like crimson clover or hairy vetch...

    Categories: Cover Crops

    Early Cover Crop Benefits: What Can You Expect in the First Year?

    By Laura Barrera

    Published May 17, 2018

    In 1995, Pennsylvania farmer Steve Groff was speaking at an event when he asked the audience the question: Do cover crops pay off?His thinking at the time was that he had been no-tilling since 1982, and maybe if he no-tilled long enough, he wouldn’t need them. Ray Weil, a soil ecologist with the University of Maryland, happened to hear his question and approached Groff about doing a cover crop study on his farm. It turned into a 12-year project, from 1995 to 2007. It was in 1999, four years into it, Groff got the answer to his question... Best cover crops to begin withFor farmers who are hoping for benefits from the get-go, Kladivko says grasses like cereal rye, wheat or barley, are good ones to start with because they grow faster and have fibrous roots...

    Categories: Cover Crops

    Can You Use Legume Cover Crops in Your Peanut Rotation?

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Aug 31, 2018

    It’s common knowledge among peanut farmers that the farther out you space your peanut crops in your rotation, the better off the peanuts will be. Research backs this up. Jason Sarver, Extension Peanut Specialist for Mississippi State University, shared some trial work published by Dr... ”He adds that oats and triticale are also good grass options... The seven cover crops were:Common vetch (legume)Hairy vetch (legume)White clover (legume)Red clover (legume)Triticale (grass)Wheat (grass)Rye (grass)While there were no significant differences between the two years in the uninfested field, on the infested field, grasses significantly reduced nematode populations and had significantly higher yields than the legume cover crops...

    Categories: Cover Crops, Peanuts

    Why is soil salinization a problem?

    By Darren Chan

    Published Aug 21, 2019

    What’s Soil SalinizationSoil salinization is one of the most vital soil problems for agricultural production. Salinization refers to the salt content of the level affecting agricultural and environmental health. Soil salinization usually occurs in arid areas, In these areas, soluble salt ions accumulate in the soil. In these areas where plant growth requires irrigation, the Evaporation and transpiration process leaves salt in the soil... Plant salt-tolerant cash crops such as barley, sunflowers, or canola...

    Categories: Agribusiness, Irrigation, Wheat

    How to Time Cover Crop Termination and Get an Effective Burndown

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Jul 1, 2019

    With May 2018 to April 2019 being the wettest 12-month period on record, according to NOAA, many farmers across the nation were forced to delay planting. In fact, for the first time on record, less than half of corn was planted by May 19, says the USDA. Even by June 2, “both corn and soybean planting were proceeding at a record slow pace... But for those who have never planted green before, it would be better to first try planting green into a grass, like cereal rye or triticale... She adds that corn also needs sufficient nitrogen at planting, especially if it’s planted into a cover crop that contains a grass like rye or triticale, which have high carbon-to-nitrogen (C:N) ratios and can keep nitrogen tied up from the corn...

    Categories: Cover Crops

    Million Dollar Dirt

    By Amanda Allworth

    Published Jul 10, 2018

    Dirt. It’s arguably a farmer’s most valuable natural resource. But what makes some soils more productive than others? That’s a complicated question to answer, but we do know that the healthiest soils share some common characteristics. While some of these are difficult to change, there are management practices you can employ to improve soil quality... Adding grass, barley, legumes or wheat to your rotation can increase carbon availability in soil...

  • Mick Humphries Australia, New South Wales, Moree

    Job Title: Farmer
    About: I'm a third generation farmer from the Moree area, Australia. Irrigated cotton is my main crop, however I also grow some wheat,barley,chick peas and sorghum as well.
    Interests: Cotton, Wheat, Grain Sorghum, Cover Crops, Precision Ag, Irrigation, Marketing, Agribusiness

  • No Groups Found
  • What Farmers Need to Know About Mycorrhizae

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Nov 2, 2018

    If someone asked you, “How do plants take up the water and nutrients they need?” you’d probably tell them through the roots. But did you know that for many crops, those roots aren’t working alone?That’s because most plant species associate with mycorrhizal fungi. What is mycorrhizal fungi? University of Alberta biological scientist JC Cahill says that mycorrhizas are actually the interaction between a fungus and a plant. Although there are many different types of mycorrhizae, the only one crop farmers need to be concerned about is arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), as 65% of plant species associate with it... Grasses like sorghums, millets, rye, triticale, barley — and oats in particular — are also excellent colonizers...

    Categories: Cover Crops

    Should You Rotate Your Cover Crops? 4 Issues to Consider

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Jun 15, 2018

    You probably know that having a crop rotation is a good thing. Growing different crops back to back provides several benefits, such as preventing pests and disease, improving soil health and reducing fertilizer inputs, all of which can boost your crop yields and your bottom line. By adding cover crops to the mix, you’re diversifying your rotation even more... While peas are usually followed with corn to utilize nitrogen in the soil and break the cycle, Robison says a dairy operation may end up using peas in an oat or triticale mixture back to back for more feed... “And the next year we plant wheat and we don’t spray any grass killer, then we possibly end up with annual ryegrass in the wheat or malting barley or some other high-value crop...

    Categories: Cover Crops

    How Yield Champions Use Cover Crops for Growing Higher Bushels

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Jun 1, 2018

    There are many factors that can influence corn yield. In fact, Fred Below, a plant physiologist at the University of Illinois, identified seven of them, which he dubbed the “Seven Wonders of the Corn Yield World. ”The seven wonders, ranked in order of most influence on yield, are:WeatherNitrogenHybridPrevious cropPlant populationTillageGrowth regulatorsWhile Below was referring to the cash crop rotation in the fourth wonder, some farmers are taking it one step further by seeding cover crops. The benefit of added crop diversity along with improvements to soil health is paying off, as some of these farmers are achieving the highest yields in the country... After the previous corn was harvested, the owner of JRH Grains LLC drilled a 7-way blend of cereal rye, triticale, oats, crimson clover, Austrian winter peas, hairy vetch and Dwarf essex rape...

    How to Use the SmartMix Calculator to Create the Perfect Cover Crop Mix

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Sep 5, 2019

    When it comes to creating a cover crop mix, the options are endless. You need to determine what kind of species you’ll use, how many you’ll use, and at what seeding rates. For anyone new to cover crop blends, these decisions can be overwhelming. Fortunately, there are several free tools available today that can guide both new and experienced cover crop users through the process of developing their own mix... “We need to know what you want to do so we can know whether to use wheat or rye or triticale or oats, because each one may have strengths and weaknesses when it comes to those different goals...

    Categories: Cover Crops

    When is it Too Late to Seed Cover Crops?

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Jan 29, 2019

    If you’re a farmer, at some point you’ll likely experience a late harvest, whether it’s due to Mother Nature or an equipment problem. And if you plan on seeding your cover crops after your crops are off, you have the added challenge of trying to get them seeded in a timely manner. Depending on how late it gets, you may wonder whether it’s even worth seeding them at all... Instead, Ebersole says wheat, triticale and cereal rye are some of the go-to species for late-seeding — according to Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education (SARE), cereal rye can germinate in soil temperatures as low as 34 degrees Fahrenheit, and needs at least 38 degrees to begin growing. If you’re planning on planting corn, you may want to avoid cereal rye and stick with either triticale or a legume like crimson clover or hairy vetch...

    Categories: Cover Crops

    Early Cover Crop Benefits: What Can You Expect in the First Year?

    By Laura Barrera

    Published May 17, 2018

    In 1995, Pennsylvania farmer Steve Groff was speaking at an event when he asked the audience the question: Do cover crops pay off?His thinking at the time was that he had been no-tilling since 1982, and maybe if he no-tilled long enough, he wouldn’t need them. Ray Weil, a soil ecologist with the University of Maryland, happened to hear his question and approached Groff about doing a cover crop study on his farm. It turned into a 12-year project, from 1995 to 2007. It was in 1999, four years into it, Groff got the answer to his question... Best cover crops to begin withFor farmers who are hoping for benefits from the get-go, Kladivko says grasses like cereal rye, wheat or barley, are good ones to start with because they grow faster and have fibrous roots...

    Categories: Cover Crops

    Can You Use Legume Cover Crops in Your Peanut Rotation?

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Aug 31, 2018

    It’s common knowledge among peanut farmers that the farther out you space your peanut crops in your rotation, the better off the peanuts will be. Research backs this up. Jason Sarver, Extension Peanut Specialist for Mississippi State University, shared some trial work published by Dr... ”He adds that oats and triticale are also good grass options... The seven cover crops were:Common vetch (legume)Hairy vetch (legume)White clover (legume)Red clover (legume)Triticale (grass)Wheat (grass)Rye (grass)While there were no significant differences between the two years in the uninfested field, on the infested field, grasses significantly reduced nematode populations and had significantly higher yields than the legume cover crops...

    Categories: Cover Crops, Peanuts

    Why is soil salinization a problem?

    By Darren Chan

    Published Aug 21, 2019

    What’s Soil SalinizationSoil salinization is one of the most vital soil problems for agricultural production. Salinization refers to the salt content of the level affecting agricultural and environmental health. Soil salinization usually occurs in arid areas, In these areas, soluble salt ions accumulate in the soil. In these areas where plant growth requires irrigation, the Evaporation and transpiration process leaves salt in the soil... Plant salt-tolerant cash crops such as barley, sunflowers, or canola...

    Categories: Agribusiness, Irrigation, Wheat

    How to Time Cover Crop Termination and Get an Effective Burndown

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Jul 1, 2019

    With May 2018 to April 2019 being the wettest 12-month period on record, according to NOAA, many farmers across the nation were forced to delay planting. In fact, for the first time on record, less than half of corn was planted by May 19, says the USDA. Even by June 2, “both corn and soybean planting were proceeding at a record slow pace... But for those who have never planted green before, it would be better to first try planting green into a grass, like cereal rye or triticale... She adds that corn also needs sufficient nitrogen at planting, especially if it’s planted into a cover crop that contains a grass like rye or triticale, which have high carbon-to-nitrogen (C:N) ratios and can keep nitrogen tied up from the corn...

    Categories: Cover Crops

    Million Dollar Dirt

    By Amanda Allworth

    Published Jul 10, 2018

    Dirt. It’s arguably a farmer’s most valuable natural resource. But what makes some soils more productive than others? That’s a complicated question to answer, but we do know that the healthiest soils share some common characteristics. While some of these are difficult to change, there are management practices you can employ to improve soil quality... Adding grass, barley, legumes or wheat to your rotation can increase carbon availability in soil...

  • Posted By Cover Crops
    Dec 23, 2016


    https://www.no-tillfarmer.com/articles/6292-triticale-a-useful-component-of-a-cover-crop-deu

    Posted By Robert Morgan
    Jun 14, 2018

    https://agfuse.com/article/uruguay-now-is-now-investing-in-usa-farms-read-why-

    Posted By Cover Crops
    May 18, 2018

    https://agfuse.com/article/early-cover-crop-benefits-what-can-you-expect-in-the-first-year-

    Posted By Samuel Prim
    Mar 11, 2019

    Looking for info on when to apply pre-plant fertilizer when planting into green cover crop. Trying a field this year where planting corn into green cover crop of triticale. This will be an irrifated field in Southeast Alabama. Any experiecnes or suggestions appreciated.

    Posted By Laura Barrera
    May 17, 2018

    https://agfuse.com/article/early-cover-crop-benefits-what-can-you-expect-in-the-first-year-

    Posted By Christopher Keen
    Aug 20, 2018

    We should have some great news in the coming days from our Canadian friends that are using #GroAloe. They are currently using GroAloe on Wheat and Barley. From what I have been told, the results are such that the Canadian government has become interested in our product.

    Posted By Cover Crops
    Jan 2

    https://www.no-tillfarmer.com/articles/8622-tips-for-growing-soybeans-or-green-beans-following-a-crimped-cover-crop

    Posted By Ryan Sorrels
    Nov 27, 2019

    Man I love Notilling into fields with lots of cover. Im harvesting soybeans while the suns out and sowing barley at night.

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    Call for applications: Envisioning Regenerative and Nourishing Food Futures for 2050

    The Rockefeller Foundation has partnered with SecondMuse and OpenIDEO to amplify the discourse on the state and the future of the world’s many food systems. And to empower communities globally to develop actionable solutions and become protagonists in their own food future. Creating a compelling and progressive Vision for the future of our food system requires a culture of collaboration that rallies industry, policy, academia, and society to act as one. When we come together, we can deliver sustainable, nourishing diets for people and the planet by 2050.

    Application Deadline: 31 January 2020

    Illustration Photo: Barley in the Desert: Kuwait Progresses in the Development of a New Variety Using Nuclear Techniques. Kuwait has an arid climate, a hostile environment in which to grow crops. In recent years, the country’s scientists have used technology packages derived from nuclear techniques (irradiation to develop new barley varieties with improved traits, combined with water and nutrient management) to be able to grow food. (credits: Dean Calma / IAEA / Flickr Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0))

    Check more https://adalidda.com/posts/5eEm7x6sKkxLagCsC/call-for-applications-envisioning-regenerative-and

    Post main image

    Commodity Calendar -Monday 9/30/2019
    Date TimeEventSurveyPrior
    9/30/2019 11:00Export Inspections - Wheat26-Sep--476.17
    9/30/2019 11:00Export Inspections - Soybeans26-Sep--922.55
    9/30/2019 11:00Export Inspections - Corn26-Sep--233.99
    9/30/2019 12:00Wheat Production - HR WinterSep842m--
    9/30/2019 12:00Wheat Production - SR WinterSep257m--
    9/30/2019 12:00Wheat Production - All WinterSep1328m--
    9/30/2019 12:00Wheat Production - White WinterSep229m--
    9/30/2019 12:00Wheat Production - All WheatSep1970m--
    9/30/2019 12:00Wheat Production - Other SpringSep590m--
    9/30/2019 12:00Wheat Production - DurumSep57m--
    9/30/2019 12:00USDA Quarterly Corn Stocks3Q2435m5202m
    9/30/2019 12:00USDA Quarterly Soybean Stocks3Q983m1790m
    9/30/2019 12:00USDA Quarterly All Wheat Stock3Q2298m1072m
    9/30/2019 12:00USDA Quarterly Barley Stocks3Q--87m
    9/30/2019 12:00USDA Quarterly Sorghum Stocks3Q--115m
    9/30/2019 12:00USDA Quarterly Oat Stocks3Q--37m
    9/30/2019 16:00Soybeans Harvested27-Sep----
    9/30/2019 16:00Corn Harvested27-Sep--7%
    9/30/2019 16:00Crop Condition Soybeans27-Sep--54%
    9/30/2019 16:00Winter Wheat Planted27-Sep--22%
    9/30/2019 16:00Cotton Condition27-Sep--39%
    9/30/2019 16:00Cotton Harvested27-Sep--11%