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Search results for 'Yellow Peas'

  • Prevented Planting? Cover Crops Offer a Silver Lining

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Jul 18, 2019

    Wet conditions across the country forced many farmers to forgo their plans for the season and take prevented planting payments instead. The USDA says that as of July 8, 2019, its paid roughly $184 million in claims for prevented planting because of floods and excess moisture... Carlson suggests using a mix of cowpeas, buckwheat and radish, with total seeds not exceeding 900,000 per acre and cowpeas making up a third to half of the mix... “Whether those are summer broadleaves like cowpeas and buckwheat, or late fall broadleaves, which would be crimson clover, radish and turnips... But if you’re seeing yellowing around the leaves, then there’s probably some herbicide injury, and you’ll have to wait and see if the cover crop dies...

    Categories: Cover Crops

    Soil Farmers of the Year 2018

    By Direct Driller Magazine

    Published Jan 19, 2019

    FARM WALKS WITH THE SOIL FARMERS OF THE YEAR 2018The winners of the FCCT Soil Farmer of the Year competition opened their gates over four days and provided a veritable masterclass in managing soils. Spanning a range of soil types, management systems and enterprises, attending farmers gained insights into their award winning management and a better understanding as to why these farms had been picked as the top three in this year’s competition. The Soil Farmer of the Year Competition, now in its third year, is run by the Farm Carbon Cutting Toolkit and Innovation for Agriculture... Simon explains – “In a normal situation, the wheat would just go all yellow and be hopeless without Nitrogen, but its looked quite decent all year... Angus explained the process that he had gone through over the last three years of using cover crops; starting out using a basic mix of oats, phacelia and buckwheat, gradually adding other species including sunflowers, peas, millet and vetches to create a diverse mix...

    Categories: Cover Crops

    Larry Yellowknee

    Interests:

    Michel Mercier: Peas as an Agronomic Weeding Tool

    By Direct Driller Magazine

    Published Aug 24, 2018

    From Direct Driller Magazine: Issue 2Written by Frédéric ThomasLike many farmers, Michel Mercier first got into direct drilling based on the economic savings it offered... Rather than simply give up on his zero-till journey Michel sought alternatives through agronomic rather than mechanical change, growing peas between wheat and OSR creating a double break in his rotation... Growing Peas after the wheat crop allows enough time for a cover crop to be established further helping increase Michel’s soil organic matter levels and biological diversity... Finally, because of this sequence, he also finds a higher nitrogen availability which to some extent compensates for the lower margin of the peas in this more diverse rotation meaning that the overall rotation margin is little changed financially... Using Peas as an Agronomic Weeding Tool (Direct Driller Issue 2 - Article 17) Michel Mercier: Using Peas as an Agronomic Weeding Tool [ATTACH] Written by Frédéric Thomas, TCS Magazine No...

    Categories: Cover Crops

    4 Steps to Building Soil Organic Matter in the South

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Jul 18, 2018

    As we learn more about what goes on in the world beneath our feet, increased attention has been placed on soil organic matter. And for good reason. While it only makes up a small percentage of most soils, the Sustainable Agriculture Research & Education (SARE) says it’s the “very foundation for healthy and productive soils” — and the more organic matter there is, the better the results. Consider the following findings from SARE and the NRCS:A study of soils in Michigan demonstrated potential crop-yield increases of about 12% for every 1% organic matter... He knows one farmer who decided to grow a mix of sorghum sudangrass, sunn hemp, daikon radish, sunflower and cowpeas right after his corn crop, before planting winter wheat...

    Categories: Cover Crops

    What Farmers Need to Know About Mycorrhizae

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Nov 2, 2018

    If someone asked you, “How do plants take up the water and nutrients they need?” you’d probably tell them through the roots. But did you know that for many crops, those roots aren’t working alone?That’s because most plant species associate with mycorrhizal fungi. What is mycorrhizal fungi? University of Alberta biological scientist JC Cahill says that mycorrhizas are actually the interaction between a fungus and a plant. Although there are many different types of mycorrhizae, the only one crop farmers need to be concerned about is arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), as 65% of plant species associate with it... ”Almost all legumes, including peas, lentils, vetch, cowpeas, chickpeas, and mung beans, are good for mycorrhizal fungi growth, he says...

    Categories: Cover Crops

    How Yield Champions Use Cover Crops for Growing Higher Bushels

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Jun 1, 2018

    There are many factors that can influence corn yield. In fact, Fred Below, a plant physiologist at the University of Illinois, identified seven of them, which he dubbed the “Seven Wonders of the Corn Yield World. ”The seven wonders, ranked in order of most influence on yield, are:WeatherNitrogenHybridPrevious cropPlant populationTillageGrowth regulatorsWhile Below was referring to the cash crop rotation in the fourth wonder, some farmers are taking it one step further by seeding cover crops... After the previous corn was harvested, the owner of JRH Grains LLC drilled a 7-way blend of cereal rye, triticale, oats, crimson clover, Austrian winter peas, hairy vetch and Dwarf essex rape... More seeds a blend of tillage radishes and forage turnips between his corn and soybeans, while a mix of oats, Austrian winter peas and clover follows soybeans before corn...

    Should You Rotate Your Cover Crops? 4 Issues to Consider

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Jun 15, 2018

    com and is an agronomist for Legacy Seeds, says there is value in rotating — especially if you’re using brassicas and peas... ”Prevent problems in peasPeas are another cover crop farmers should avoid growing too often in rotation, Robison says. “Peas have been known to have some detrimental effect in the soil, if they are used back to back to back,” he explains. While peas are usually followed with corn to utilize nitrogen in the soil and break the cycle, Robison says a dairy operation may end up using peas in an oat or triticale mixture back to back for more feed... “The key thing we see there is a lack of production in peas,” Robison says...

    Categories: Cover Crops

    When is it Too Late to Seed Cover Crops?

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Jan 29, 2019

    If you’re a farmer, at some point you’ll likely experience a late harvest, whether it’s due to Mother Nature or an equipment problem. And if you plan on seeding your cover crops after your crops are off, you have the added challenge of trying to get them seeded in a timely manner. Depending on how late it gets, you may wonder whether it’s even worth seeding them at all. It leads to the question: Is it ever too late to seed cover crops?The short answer: It depends... Peas are another option because they can be more cold-tolerant than brassicas, but won’t provide a lot of growth because of the cold...

    Categories: Cover Crops

    High-efficiency bio nematicide to control root knot nematodes

    By Darren Chan

    Published Apr 11, 2019

    Damages of nematodesNematodes attack plant roots, stems and leaves. They are a major group of crop pathogens and cause worldwide losses estimated at about US$120 billion every year. They inhabit the soil and damage the roots of plants, weakening their ability to absorb water and nutrients. The symptoms of these damages include stunting, yellowing of plant leaves, and loss of plant vigour. Nematodes rarely killing plants directly, But they will affect plant growth and yields greatly...

    Categories: Agribusiness, Cotton, Soybeans

  • Larry Yellowknee

    Interests:

    Mick Humphries Australia, New South Wales, Moree

    Job Title: Farmer
    About: I'm a third generation farmer from the Moree area, Australia. Irrigated cotton is my main crop, however I also grow some wheat,barley,chick peas and sorghum as well.
    Interests: Cotton, Wheat, Grain Sorghum, Cover Crops, Precision Ag, Irrigation, Marketing, Agribusiness

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  • Prevented Planting? Cover Crops Offer a Silver Lining

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Jul 18, 2019

    Wet conditions across the country forced many farmers to forgo their plans for the season and take prevented planting payments instead. The USDA says that as of July 8, 2019, its paid roughly $184 million in claims for prevented planting because of floods and excess moisture... Carlson suggests using a mix of cowpeas, buckwheat and radish, with total seeds not exceeding 900,000 per acre and cowpeas making up a third to half of the mix... “Whether those are summer broadleaves like cowpeas and buckwheat, or late fall broadleaves, which would be crimson clover, radish and turnips... But if you’re seeing yellowing around the leaves, then there’s probably some herbicide injury, and you’ll have to wait and see if the cover crop dies...

    Categories: Cover Crops

    Soil Farmers of the Year 2018

    By Direct Driller Magazine

    Published Jan 19, 2019

    FARM WALKS WITH THE SOIL FARMERS OF THE YEAR 2018The winners of the FCCT Soil Farmer of the Year competition opened their gates over four days and provided a veritable masterclass in managing soils. Spanning a range of soil types, management systems and enterprises, attending farmers gained insights into their award winning management and a better understanding as to why these farms had been picked as the top three in this year’s competition. The Soil Farmer of the Year Competition, now in its third year, is run by the Farm Carbon Cutting Toolkit and Innovation for Agriculture... Simon explains – “In a normal situation, the wheat would just go all yellow and be hopeless without Nitrogen, but its looked quite decent all year... Angus explained the process that he had gone through over the last three years of using cover crops; starting out using a basic mix of oats, phacelia and buckwheat, gradually adding other species including sunflowers, peas, millet and vetches to create a diverse mix...

    Categories: Cover Crops

    Michel Mercier: Peas as an Agronomic Weeding Tool

    By Direct Driller Magazine

    Published Aug 24, 2018

    From Direct Driller Magazine: Issue 2Written by Frédéric ThomasLike many farmers, Michel Mercier first got into direct drilling based on the economic savings it offered... Rather than simply give up on his zero-till journey Michel sought alternatives through agronomic rather than mechanical change, growing peas between wheat and OSR creating a double break in his rotation... Growing Peas after the wheat crop allows enough time for a cover crop to be established further helping increase Michel’s soil organic matter levels and biological diversity... Finally, because of this sequence, he also finds a higher nitrogen availability which to some extent compensates for the lower margin of the peas in this more diverse rotation meaning that the overall rotation margin is little changed financially... Using Peas as an Agronomic Weeding Tool (Direct Driller Issue 2 - Article 17) Michel Mercier: Using Peas as an Agronomic Weeding Tool [ATTACH] Written by Frédéric Thomas, TCS Magazine No...

    Categories: Cover Crops

    4 Steps to Building Soil Organic Matter in the South

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Jul 18, 2018

    As we learn more about what goes on in the world beneath our feet, increased attention has been placed on soil organic matter. And for good reason. While it only makes up a small percentage of most soils, the Sustainable Agriculture Research & Education (SARE) says it’s the “very foundation for healthy and productive soils” — and the more organic matter there is, the better the results. Consider the following findings from SARE and the NRCS:A study of soils in Michigan demonstrated potential crop-yield increases of about 12% for every 1% organic matter... He knows one farmer who decided to grow a mix of sorghum sudangrass, sunn hemp, daikon radish, sunflower and cowpeas right after his corn crop, before planting winter wheat...

    Categories: Cover Crops

    What Farmers Need to Know About Mycorrhizae

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Nov 2, 2018

    If someone asked you, “How do plants take up the water and nutrients they need?” you’d probably tell them through the roots. But did you know that for many crops, those roots aren’t working alone?That’s because most plant species associate with mycorrhizal fungi. What is mycorrhizal fungi? University of Alberta biological scientist JC Cahill says that mycorrhizas are actually the interaction between a fungus and a plant. Although there are many different types of mycorrhizae, the only one crop farmers need to be concerned about is arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), as 65% of plant species associate with it... ”Almost all legumes, including peas, lentils, vetch, cowpeas, chickpeas, and mung beans, are good for mycorrhizal fungi growth, he says...

    Categories: Cover Crops

    How Yield Champions Use Cover Crops for Growing Higher Bushels

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Jun 1, 2018

    There are many factors that can influence corn yield. In fact, Fred Below, a plant physiologist at the University of Illinois, identified seven of them, which he dubbed the “Seven Wonders of the Corn Yield World. ”The seven wonders, ranked in order of most influence on yield, are:WeatherNitrogenHybridPrevious cropPlant populationTillageGrowth regulatorsWhile Below was referring to the cash crop rotation in the fourth wonder, some farmers are taking it one step further by seeding cover crops... After the previous corn was harvested, the owner of JRH Grains LLC drilled a 7-way blend of cereal rye, triticale, oats, crimson clover, Austrian winter peas, hairy vetch and Dwarf essex rape... More seeds a blend of tillage radishes and forage turnips between his corn and soybeans, while a mix of oats, Austrian winter peas and clover follows soybeans before corn...

    Should You Rotate Your Cover Crops? 4 Issues to Consider

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Jun 15, 2018

    com and is an agronomist for Legacy Seeds, says there is value in rotating — especially if you’re using brassicas and peas... ”Prevent problems in peasPeas are another cover crop farmers should avoid growing too often in rotation, Robison says. “Peas have been known to have some detrimental effect in the soil, if they are used back to back to back,” he explains. While peas are usually followed with corn to utilize nitrogen in the soil and break the cycle, Robison says a dairy operation may end up using peas in an oat or triticale mixture back to back for more feed... “The key thing we see there is a lack of production in peas,” Robison says...

    Categories: Cover Crops

    When is it Too Late to Seed Cover Crops?

    By Laura Barrera

    Published Jan 29, 2019

    If you’re a farmer, at some point you’ll likely experience a late harvest, whether it’s due to Mother Nature or an equipment problem. And if you plan on seeding your cover crops after your crops are off, you have the added challenge of trying to get them seeded in a timely manner. Depending on how late it gets, you may wonder whether it’s even worth seeding them at all. It leads to the question: Is it ever too late to seed cover crops?The short answer: It depends... Peas are another option because they can be more cold-tolerant than brassicas, but won’t provide a lot of growth because of the cold...

    Categories: Cover Crops

    High-efficiency bio nematicide to control root knot nematodes

    By Darren Chan

    Published Apr 11, 2019

    Damages of nematodesNematodes attack plant roots, stems and leaves. They are a major group of crop pathogens and cause worldwide losses estimated at about US$120 billion every year. They inhabit the soil and damage the roots of plants, weakening their ability to absorb water and nutrients. The symptoms of these damages include stunting, yellowing of plant leaves, and loss of plant vigour. Nematodes rarely killing plants directly, But they will affect plant growth and yields greatly...

    Categories: Agribusiness, Cotton, Soybeans

    What’s root knot nematode?

    By Darren Chan

    Published May 7, 2019

    Root-knot nematodes are one of the three most economically damaging genera of plant-parasitic nematodes on horticultural and field crops. Root-knot nematodes are very small and they parasitic the roots of thousands of plant species, including monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous, herbaceous and woody plants. They dwell in the soil, attack the roots of the plant to extract water and nutrients. As a result, large galls or “knots” can form throughout the root systems of infected plants... Stunted, yellowed, or wilted, and can lead to premature death of the plant...

    Categories: Agribusiness, Irrigation, Specialty/Vegetable

  • Posted By Laura Barrera
    Jun 15, 2018

    https://agfuse.com/article/should-you-rotate-your-cover-crops-4-issues-to-consider

    Posted By Willis Jepson
    May 9, 2018

    Cover crops hard at work in TN. Winter peas making nitrogen.

    Post main image

    Posted By Direct Driller Magazine
    Aug 24, 2018

    https://agfuse.com/article/michel-mercier-peas-as-an-agronomic-weeding-tool

    Posted By Cover Crops
    Jun 15, 2018

    https://agfuse.com/article/should-you-rotate-your-cover-crops-4-issues-to-consider

    Posted By Garrett Smith
    Sep 29, 2018

    planted 50 pound of winter peas as a cover crop. looking forward to the nitrogen addition.

    Posted By Cover Crops
    Dec 27, 2018

    https://agfuse.com/article/should-you-rotate-your-cover-crops-4-issues-to-consider

    Posted By Darren Chan
    Dec 4, 2018

    https://agfuse.com/article/what-039-s-symptom-grape-leaf-roll-disease

    Posted By Cover Crops
    Dec 6, 2018

    https://agfuse.com/article/should-you-rotate-your-cover-crops-4-issues-to-consider

    Posted By Corn Growers Group
    Aug 14, 2018

    https://www.cornandsoybeandigest.com/corn/physoderma-brown-spot-and-node-rot-corn

    Posted By Cotton News
    Mar 26, 2018

    http://www.agupdate.com/agriview/news/business/cotton-picking-good-harvester-launched/article_fa0f9881-0e24-5318-90bf-f60e036808b4.html